FOREIGN FLAG VESSELS UNDER CONTROL
OF THE WAR SHIPPING ADMINISTRATION LOST OR
DAMAGED DURING WORLD WAR II.  *=Includes info from Ships of ESSO Fleet
This section contains a brief summary and account of 67 Panamanian and Honduran flag merchant ships lost or damaged during World War II upon which American Merchant Seamen and U.S. Naval Armed Guard were lost or wounded. These ships were under the control of the War Shipping Administration representing the Government of the United States.
Most of these ships, freighters and tankers, were interned in a U.S. port and were eventually taken over by the U.S. Government under an Executive Order, Public Law #101. These ships were interned in a U.S. port at the outbreak of hostilities in Europe and during the years preceding America's entry into the war.
They were eventually allotted to the U.S. Maritime Commission who turned them over to the War Shipping Administration for operation. The War Shipping Administration in turn assigned them to American steamship companies under a General Agency Agreement. Upon activation, these ships were registered under the Flag of Panama.
In addition to these ships, the War Shipping Administration bareboat and time chartered many other ships that were already registered under the Panamanian or Honduran Flag. These ships were owned by American steamship operators such as United Fruit, Standard Oil of New Jersey, and Socony Vacuum Oil Company.
These ships were manned by Merchant Seamen of many nationalities including Americans. Many of them had U.S. Naval Armed Guard aboard.
Only ships carrying American seamen as part of the crew and/or a U.S. Naval Armed Guard contingent are listed. In addition, I have listed the names of all those American Merchant Seamen who were lost or wounded on these ships. These men were never listed as lost by the U.S. Coast Guard as they were crew members on a foreign flag vessel.
The following is not a complete list of the foreign flag ships lost or damaged during World War II that were under the control of the War Shipping Administration. There were many others lost that did not carry any Americans in the merchant crew but did have U.S. Naval Armed Guard aboard. Data on these ships was not available.
AFRICANDER
ALCEDO
ANEROID
AMAPALA
ARRIAGA *
BAJA CALIFORNIA
BALLOT
BEACONLIGHT *
BUCHANAN
BUSHRANGER
C.O. STILLMAN *
CAPIRA
CARDINA
CARMONA
CASTILLA
CHARLES PRATT *
CHENANGO
COLD HARBOR
COLIN
COMAYAGUA
DESERT LIGHT
EL CAPITAN
EL COSTON
EL LAGO
EL OCCIDENTE
EQUIPOISE
ESSO BOLIVAR *
FIRETHORN
FRIAR ROCK
GRANVILLE
H.H. ROGERS *
HALMA
HEINRICH von RIEDEMANN *
HERMIS
I.C. WHITE *
J.A. MOWINCKEL *
JOHNSTOWN
LUBRAFOL
MACBETH
MAMBI
NIMBA
OLANCHO
ONTARIO
PANAM
PILLORY
PLAUDIT
POMPOON
PINK STAR
RACELAND
RAMAPO
REINE MARIE STEWART
SAN BLAS
SAN GIL
SAN PABLO
SCAPA FLOW
SHEHERAZADE
SIR HUON
STANVAC CALCUTTA
STANVAC MANILA
STANVAC MELBOURNE
STANVAC PALEMBANG
STONE STREET
SYLVAN ARROW
TAMBOUR
TELA
WINKLER
ZAANDAM




NOTE: Figures in parentheses denote age of the Seaman.


SS AFRICANDER
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: Waterman SS Co. Mobile, Alabama
Master: Bjarne A. Lia (32) (Norwegian)
Built: Trieste 1921
Gross Tons: 5441
Former Name: AUSSA ex Italian

The SS AFRICANDER, ex Italian SS AUSSA, was taken over by the U.S. Government under an Executive Order, Public Law 101, at the port of New York on September 11, 1941. The War Shipping Administration allotted the ship to the Waterman Steamship Agency to be operated under a GAA agreement at the port of New York on October 20, 1941.
The SS AFRICANDER was attacked by German aircraft on September 13, 1942 at 1550 GCT, about 60 miles south of Spitzbergen, while en route from Loch Ewe, Scotland to Archangel, USSR, with a cargo of Machinery plus six tanks and 5 planes on deck, while proceeding in Convoy PQ 18 (#94).
At 1550 GCT, two torpedoes dropped from torpedo planes at an altitude of about 150 feet, struck the ship on the starboard side aft of #3 hold causing the ship to settle slowly by the stern. Engines were secured at once. There was no fire. Stearing gear was put out of commission by the explosion and the water tight bulkheads were ruptured. The ship went down by the stern within a few minutes of the attack.
There were no casualties among the merchant crew of 35 men. All hands abandoned ship in lifeboats despite machine gun fire from aircraft. The survivors were picked up by escort vessels which took them to Scotland via Iceland. At Scotland they embarked on HMS QUEEN MARY arriving Boston on October 15, 1942.
The AFRICANDER had departed New York on April 11th and arrived the Clyde River via Halifax on May 9th. She left the Clyde on May 18th and proceeded to Iceland arriving there on May 25th. She remained anchored there until August 3rd when she was ordered back to the Clyde and then to Loch Ewe. On September 2nd she left Loch Ewe in Convoy PQ 18.
The Master of this ship, Bjarne A. Lia, died while he was Master of the Panamanian flag tanker, SS BOSTONIAN. On August 14, 1944, there was a Benzol gas leak in the pumproom endangering the safety of the ship and crew. He descended into the pumproom to plug the leak but he was overcome by the fumes and died. For this valiant effort, he was awarded the Merchant Marine Distinguished Service Medal posthumously on November 14, 1944.
Also on board was an Armed Guard (U.S.N.) contingent of 11 men. They all survived.
U.S. MERCHANT CREW SURVIVORS
BREEN, Charles E. (18)
CALHOUN, Clifton P. (47)
FOGG, Edward E. Jr. (21)
HEMPSTEAD, Joseph L. (49)
LEVIN, Harold (21)
MOORE, Alfred J. (26)
O'DONNELL, George P. (23)
PRICE, Jeffrey T. (39)
ROBERTS, Francis P. (19)
STALEY, William E. (24)
TODIS, Charles C. (18)
CARRA, Thomas P. (20)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
TIPPING, Kenneth W.
CHAFFIN, George A.
HOWARD, Leonard D.
HOWARD, Morton W.
JACKSON, Harry M.
JENKS, Henry R.
KING, James E., Jr.
SOLIS, Leo J.
WRIGHT, Stancfield
LIMA, Antonio D., Jr.
NALL, Edgar E.
 
Wiper
Messman
Messman
Ch. Engr.
Radio Oper.
A.B.
O.S.
Fireman
O.S.
Messman
O.S.
O.S.
 

Ensign
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
RM 3/c
SM 3/c
 
Rockland, ME
New York City
Poughkeepsie, NY
Brooklyn, NY
Dorchester, MA
Brooklyn,NY
Philadelphia,PA
New York City
Somerville, MA
John's Island, SC
Roxbury, MA
Bethlehem, PA















SS ALCEDO
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: Marine Trans. Co. (1/17/42): Cosmopolitan Shipping (12/27/42)
Master: Marius A. Kolster (53) Danish. Danish Ship Oper. Co.
Built: Fredrikstad, Denmark 1937. 2/03/44
Gross Tons: 1392
Former Name: TANJA (Danish)

The SS ALCEDO, a coal burning freighter, under the Panamanian flag, was taken over by the U.S. in the port of New York on July 21, 1941 at 1200 hours. This action taken under Public Law #101. This vessel was idle until January 17, 1942 when she was turned over to the Marine Transport Line for operation under a GAA contract. She was subsequently operated by two other companies stated above before she was lost.
The SS ALCEDO was torpedoed by the German U-1022 (Hans-Joachim Ernst) at 2300 local time on February 28,1945, while en route from Loch Ewe, Scotland to Reykjavik, in Convoy UR-155 (#22), with a cargo of 1767 tons of Army and Navy supplies plus U.S. mail. Position of the sinking was 64-00N./22-46 W.
The ALCEDO had departed Boston on January 20, 1945 and arrived Belfast, Northern Ireland on February 6 to take bunkers. Leaving Belfast on February 11 she arrived Loch Ewe the next day and departed Loch Ewe on February 22nd.
The ship's complement consisted of 32 crew members, 5 U.S. Naval Armed Guard, and 1 Navy security officer. Three crew members were lost and 8 injured. One of those lost was an Able Seaman who had been caught in the safety net hanging over the starboard side and when the ship listed heavily to starboard he was trapped and drowned. Another A.B. fell into the hole on deck which was caused by the explosion of the torpedo. The 3rd crew member, a Messman, went down with the ship when he refused to jump overboard to be picked up by a lifeboat. There were 3 Americans in the crew plus 15 other nationalities.
There were 5 ships plus 5 escorts in the convoy. A torpedo struck on the starboard side between #3 and #4 hatches. The force of the explosion sheared off the mainmast and it fell to port. The propeller shaft was broken stopping the engine. There was immediate flooding of #4 hold causing the ship to sink by the stern, disappearing under the sea at 2325 local time.
The ship was abandoned at 2315 under the orders of the Master in 2 boats and 2 rafts. Survivors were picked up at 0140 March 1 by HMS HOME GUARD (T 394) and landed at Reykjavik at 0600 the same day.

The U-1022 surrendered at the end of hostilities and was scuttled by the British in "Operation Deadlight".

LOSS OF THE SS ALCEDO
U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
CORAGGIO, Nicholas (16)
KENNEDY, Charles R. (16)
MORRISON, William F. (16)
 
 
O.S.
O.S.
Coal Passer
The crew list for this ship does not list the home address ofthe three seamen. All three were only 16 years old and sailing on waivers.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
BONES, Anthony E.
DARE, Donald E.
DeBUTY, Warren R.
HUMPHREY, Paul C.
McLELLAND, Gerald A.

MERCHANT CREW LOST
Neville John HORSELMAN (22)
Oswald CLAUSEN (22)
Ah Ching FOO (35)
 
BM 2c
S lc
S lc
S lc
SM 3c
 

A.B.
A.B.
Messman








Australian
Danish
Chinese


SS ANEROID
Home Port : Panama, R.P.
Company : South Atlantic SS Co. Savannah, Ga.
Master : lngvald K. Eide (U.S. citizen)
Built : Belfast, N.I. 1917
Gross Tons : 5974
Former Name : SAN GIUSEPPE (Italian)

The SS ANEROID, a Panamanian flag freighter fueled by coal, was taken over by the U.S. on September 3, 1941 at the port of Norfolk under an Executive Order. In turn the ship was turned over to the above named steamship company by the War Shipping Administration on September 9th for operation under a GAA contract. The ship was time-chartered to Alcoa SS Company at the time of the loss.
The SS ANEROID was torpedoed by the German U-175 (Heinrich Bruns) on October 2, 1942 at 0500 EWT while en route from Paramaribo to Trinidad with a cargo of 3348 tons of Bauxite. The attack took place at 8-24 N./59-12 W. which was about 130 miles off Georgetown, B.G.
On board was a complement of 40 merchant crew and 9 U.S. Naval Armed Guard. Five crew members and one Navy gunner were lost.
At 0500 EWT a torpedo struck on the starboard side at #4 hatch just abaft the engine room. The explosion opened a huge hole in the bulkhead between #4 hold and #5 hold causing this hold to flood. #5 hold was empty to give the ship the proper draft to cross the Surinam Bar. The ship sank at 0515 EWT.
During the lowering of the two port side boats, both of them got fouled up in wires hanging from the davits. These wires had tangled in the hand rails which made further lowering impossible. Eventually #2 boat was cleared away and launched with an unknown number of men. After it was launched it drifted down the port side into rigging from the toppled mainmast and #4 cargo booms, causing #2 boat to capsize throwing the occupants into the water. They were in turn picked up by #1 boat.
As #3 boat had been safely launched, all the survivors were in the two boats. The Master, who was in #3 boat, ordered the 3rd Mate to take charge of #1 boat. Lifeboat #3 which contained the Master plus 24 crew members and 4 Navy men, was picked up by the Yugoslav freighter SS IVAN at 1700 EWT on October 2nd and landed at Georgetown, B.G. Lifeboat #1, containing 10 crew and 4 Navy men, was picked up by the Honduran SS OLAMBALA at 0800 on October 4th and landed at Paramaribo, D.G. on October 9th.

The U-175 (Bruns) was sunk by the USCG SPENCER in position 48-40 N./21-20 W. on April 17, 1943. There were 13 members of the U-175 lost including the Captain. They were killed by gunfire from the SPENCER.
U.S. MERCHANT CREW SURVIVORS
EIDE, Ingvald K.
DIAMOND, Anthony
HILLARD, William
LePAGE, Joseph
McCORMICK, William

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
EVE, Henry F.
HEINKEL, John F.
KIRCH, Robert E.
STEVENSON, S.E.
VAWTER, Alfred W.
VOSIKIS, James G.
WHITE, Hershel E.
WILCOX, Raymond T.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
MULLEN, Bernard J.

MERCHANT CREW LOST (Foreign)
DeSOUSA, Antonio
JOHANSEN, Olaf
KARLSON, Nils E.
LARSSON, Erick
WILLIAMS, Cyril
 
Master
Ch. Engr.
Messman
Coal Passer
Messman

 
Ensign
S 2c
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
S 2c
A.S.
A.S.

 
A.S.

 
Fireman
Chief Mate
Oiler
A.B.
Fireman
 
Valley Stream, NY
Corona, NY
West New York, NJ
Yonkers, NY
Hondo, Tx















Portugal
Norway
Sweden
Sweden
England


SS AMAPALA
Home Port : La Ceiba, Hon.
Company : Standard Fruit & SS Co. New Orleans, La.
Master : Harold B. Christiansen (U.S.)
Built : Newcastle, England 1924
Gross Tons : 4148
Dimensions : 365' x 50' x 29'

The SS AMAPALA, was under the command of Captain Harold Christiansen, an American citizen, who lived in Brooklyn, NY. He was an 18-year veteran of the company and had held a Master's license for 8 years.
The SS AMPALA sailed from New Orleans on May 14, 1942 at 1300 for Cristobal and La Ceiba, Honduras loaded with general cargo. The Master was ordered to anchor at Pilottown about 1900 that night. At 0600 on the 15th she left the anchorage and cleared Southwest Pass around 0730.
About 1630 on the same day (15th), a submarine was seen coming up fast on the starboard quarter, about 4 miles away. At that time the ship was making 15 knots and zigzagging. The Master ordered a course change to put the ship's stern to the sub. After this the Master went to the wireless room and ordered the Chief Radio Operator to send out an SOS and SSS four times with the ship's position which was 26-40 N./88-17 W.
At 1635, the ship came under shell and machine gun fire from the U-507 (Harro Schacht). The Chief Engineer gave the ship all the speed he could but the Master soon realized that the sub was hitting the ship with both shell and machine gun fire. The starboard side was being hit bad and at 1655 the ship was feeling the full effect of the attack. The shell fire had destroyed #3 lifeboat and a Fireman had received several shrapnel wounds in the abdomen and both legs. At 1705, the Master ordered the engines stopped and for the crew to abandon ship. The sub continued the attack with machine gun fire.
At the time #3 boat was struck with shell fire, 5 men who were standing in it were thrown into the water. Lifeboat #4, which had been launched first, rowed around the stern to the starboard side and picked up these 5 men. Lifeboat #1, the Chief Mate's boat, was then launched. The Master's boat, #2 boat, was the last to be launched. The wounded Fireman was placed in the Master's boat. This boat was very crowded because most of the crew had gone to the port side to get away from the machine gun fire. During the launching of the boats shells continued to strike the ship causing severe damage.
Ten men were transferred from #2 boat into #1 boat. Shortly after the men abandoned ship, a plane appeared about 1900 and sighted the sub. The plane attacked the sub at once dropping a load of bombs or depth charges. The plane remained in the area for an hour then left.
Jose Rodriguez, the badly wounded Fireman, was placed alongside the Master in the boat. He continued to bleed badly but made no complaint of pain. He remained conscious until 1945 at which time he gave no further sign of life. He died at 2000 and was buried the next morning in the sea.
On May 16th, a Coast Guard plane passed overhead and flew to the east to hail a fishing schooner to direct it to the boats. At that time the AMPALA was still afloat but her whole after deck was awash. Shortly after 1000, a Coast Guard plane appeared, landed on the water and took two injured men to Pensacola Naval Hospital.
All of the remaining crew were picked up by the F/V GONZALEZ out of Mobile. It was at this time that the Master decided to bury Mr. Rodriguez at sea as the schooner was so small. The survivors were landed at Burrwood Naval Base on Sunday at 0900 on May 17th. The ship was still afloat when the crew was picked up.
The AMAPALA was taken in tow by the USCG Boutwell but she sank while in tow about 1800 CWT on May 16th.
The AMAPALA was unarmed and sailing unescorted. Mr. Rodriguez was a Spanish citizen. He was the only one lost.
There were 12 American citizens in the crew of the AMAPALA. Their names are listed below but outside of the Master, there are no records of where they lived. There is no official crew list on file for this ship only a Crew List for the Panama Canal authorities which gives only names and nationalities. It did not list positions of the crew. Some positions were obtained from statements given by survivors.

CHRISTIANSEN, Harold B.
JOHANSEN, Joachim
SCHLESINGER, Harry
GREEN, George W.
RUBIN, Ira
MacFARLANE, John
NOVAK, Charles
WEAGLE, Charles
SNYDER, Richard
PAUL, Edgar
HAMBLYN, Fritz
GEPEDA, Felix
Master
Ch. Mate
Ch. Radio Oper.
2nd Radio Oper.
3rd Radio Oper.
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Brooklyn, NY












The U-507 (Schacht was bombed and sunk by U.S.Navy plane (VP-83) NW of Natal, Brazil (1-38 S./39-52 W.) on January 15, 1943. There were no survivors.


MS ARRIAGA
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: Lago Petroleum Corp.
Master: Gunnar Gjertsen
Built: Rochester, NY 1940
Gross Tons: 2345
Dimensions: 300' x 43' x 23'
Former Names: (a) DOLOMITE 3 (b) PETROHEAT

The MS ARRIAGA, a small oil tanker, was purchased by the Lago Petroleum Corporation (subsidiary of Standard Oil of New Jersey) on April 2, 1942 from the Dolomite 3 Corporation, a subsidiary of Petroleum Heat and Power Company of Baltimore. The vessel was registered under the flag of Panama but carried an American crew.
The Panamanian flag tanker, MS ARRIAGA, was torpedoed by the German U-68 (Karl-Friedrich Mertens) on June 23, 1942 at 1235 CWT while en route from Baltimore to Aruba carrying 3100 tons of fresh water for the refinery at Aruba. She was in convoy from Baltimore to the Yucatan Channel. At this time the escort left. This was June 18th. From that time on she was on her own.
On board was 23 merchant crew and 2 Naval Armed Guard. The Chief Engineer was killed when the torpedo exploded directly under his room.
A torpedo struck the tanker on the port side just forward of the after house ripping a huge hole in the side of the ship, destroying the port lifeboat, and blowing a hole in the engine room bulkhead. Also put the steering gear out of action causing the ship to swing 90 before stopping. The sub surfaced 100 yards from the ARRIAGA. The 2 Navy gunners fired the 6 pound gun on the after part of the tanker with no results. The position of the sinking was 13-08 N./72-16 W. or about 50 miles off the coast of Colombia. The ship sank in 10 minutes.
The crew abandoned ship in the starboard boat and one raft.There were four on the raft and they were taken aboard the lifeboat. On June 25th, the boat was taken in tow by a Colombian fishing boat which dropped the tow near the beach of a town called Pajaro. The crew rowed the remaining distance to the beach. The boat was then towed by a fishing vessel to a town named Rio Hacha. At this place the crew was taken care of by the British consul. Eventually they were taken to Barranquilla, and then by plane to Miami.

The U-68 (Lauzemis) was sunk on April 10, 1944 north of Madeira in position 33-25 N./18-59 W. by aircraft from the USS GUADALCANAL (CVE 60). There was only one survivor from the U-68 who was rescued by the U.S. Navy. 56 others in the crew were lost.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN LOST
Harry L. HOVLAND

 
Chief Engr.
The names of the survivors can be found in the book
"SHIPS OF THE ESSO FLEET IN WW II."


SS BAJA CALIFORNIA
Home Port: Puerto Cortez, Hon.
Company: United Fruit Co.
Master: Aage Christensen (U.S.)
Built: Sunderland, England 1914
Gross Tons: 1648
Dimensions: 265' x 38.5'

The Honduran flag freighter, SS BAJA CALIFORNIA, was torpedoed by the German U-84 (Horst Uphoff) at 2345 EWT on July 18, 1942 while en route frorn New Orleans to Puerto Barrios, Guatemala with a full load of general cargo. The attack took place 40 miles NxE from Rebecca Shoals (25-14 N./82-27 W.)
She carried a complement of 32 in the merchant crew and 5 U.S. Navy Armed Guard. Three (3) crew members were lost and 10 hospitalized with serious injuries. The Chief Engineer suffered multiple injuries including a broken leg.
The ship was struck by two torpedoes. The first hit at the forward end of #1 hatch on the port side and the second hit at the forward end of #3 hatch abaft the Chief Engineer's room. She took a port list at once. Within 10 minutes the ship had turned on its side and disappeared.
The port boat (#2) was destroyed by the explosion. The starboard boat was launched along with a large raft and a small donut type raft. Around noon of the next day July 19th, a large plane circled overhead but did not see the survivors. At day-light on the 20th a fishing schooner that had seen the flares fired just before daylight headed towards the boat and raft. This boat stopped to tell the Master there was a small raft with one man aboard. The fishing vessel then proceeded to the raft and picked up the man and then returned to pick up the others from the boat and raft. The name of the fishing vessel was SAN IGNACIO out of Cuba. Survivors were taken to the Havana Naval Station arriving there at noon on July 21st.

The U-84 (Uphoff) was sunk August 26, 1943 by aircraft (VC-13) from the USS CORE (CVE-13) in position 27-00 N./37-03 W. There were no survivors.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
ALLISON, William F. (37)
BRADICICH, Leo (60)
CHRISTENSEN, Aage (49)
DELI, Arpad (36)
DUHART, Henry (41 )
JOHNSON, Charles (26)
SELLAR, Charles T. (52)
ZWICK, Marullo (53)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
JOHNSON, John
KEYES, Robert C.
LOCKE, Ernest E.
PONSH1, J.
WILKES, Rufus C.

MERCHANT CREW LOST (Foreign)
BARROW, Raymond
HEWIE, Roland
MEJIA, Luis
 
Ch. Mate
Ch. Engr.
Master
2nd Engr.
2nd Mate
3rd Engr.
Ch. Stew.
1st Engr.
 

(S 2c)
S 2c
Coxswain
S 2c
A.S.
 

Messman
Messman
Messman

Algiers, LA
New Orleans
New Orleans
Hammond, LA
New Orleans
New Orleans
Myrtle Grove, LA
Hammond, LA









Honduras
Honduras
Honduras


SS BALLOT
Home Port : Panama City, R.P.
Company : Lykes Bros. SS Co.
Master : Henry Bejer (40) Danish citizen
Built : Monfalcone, Italy 1922
Gross Tons : 6080
Dimensions : 350' x 50' x 25'
Former Name: Alberta ex Italien

The SS Ballot left Reykjavik on March 20, 1942 in Convoy PQ13. On March 25th, a gale came up from the Northeast and by forenoon of the 26th it was blowing Force 8 with poor visibility. The gale continued to blow for the next 36 hours. By daylight of the 27th, the convoy was scattered all over the ocean. On March 28th 6 merchant ships found each other and formed a new convoy with the armed whaler Silja. Later on the 28th March a Messerschmidt 110 dropped 5 or 6 bombs, causing much damage in the engineroom. (steamleaks). The engines were stopped. According to the masters statement, half of the crew demanded to go in the lifeboats while the other half promised to stay aboard and try to bring the ship to port. 16 men abandoned the ship in the port boat. . They were picked up later by the Silja. The engineers were able to stop most of the leaks. The Ballot got underway to join the other ships, but discovered problems with the stearing gear and had to stop again to switch over to manual steering, and proceed their voyage. On the 30th two towboats brought the ship in. The ship left Murmansk in convoy QP11.
The 16 crewmembers that were picked up by the Silja. On the 29th the 16 crewmembers boarded the Induna. On the 30th in position 70-55N/37-18E the Induna was struck by a torpedo fired from the U-376. After a second torpedo the Induna sank within 30 minutes. The starboard lifeboat #1 had 32 survivors, the port lifeboat #2 had only 9 survivors, the 3rd mate of the Ballot took charge of this boat. The starboard boat #1 was picked up by a Russian minesweeper, only 17 of the 32 were still alive. The port boat #2 was picked up by an Russian patrol boat., two of them later died in a Murmansk hospital. Of the 16 men who left the Ballot, 11 lost their lives and 5 survived. (9 Ballot crewmembers and 2 british gunners)
(For more details about the Ballot: see A Careless word.. a Needless sinking (7th edition))

SS Ballot crewmembers who abandoned ship on the 28th
Ahlberg, Claes F
Andersson, Ivar
Bennet, Russle H.
Blackley, James
DuJardin, Julien
Eriksson, Christian
Fritiof, Carl
Hyde, Peter
Larangeira, Avelino
Lasovich, Vassiyl
Luz, Carlos
Morris, Lee E
Morris, William
O'Brien, James
Walker, Henry
Firth, Harold

Fireman
AB
OS
AB
3rd Mate
Oiler
Messman
Bosun
Fireman
2nd Cook
OS
Messman
OS
Wiper
Gunner
Gunner

Bellrose, NY

Temperance, MI

Belgium



Portugal

Portugal

Lynn, MA
Boston, MA
British
British

 
Lost on Induna

Lost on Induna

Lost on Induna
Lost on Induna


Lost on Induna

Lost on Induna

died in Murmansk April 12th
Lost on Induna
Lost on Induna

Listed the 9 seamen of life boat #2 of the Induna March 30th
Ahlberg, Claes F.
Bennet, Russel H.
DuJardin, Julien C.
Morris, William
Anderson, James B.(16)
Byrne, Austin
Olivarez, Aurelio (43)
Robinson, M
Smith, Stanley (21)
Fireman
OS
3rd Mate
OS
Cabin Boy
Gunner
Fireman
Gunner
Fireman
SS Ballot
SS Ballot
SS Ballot
SS Ballot
SS Induna
SS Induna
SS Induna
SS Induna
SS Induna
Injured, lost a food
Died of exposure
Injured
Lost both feed & fingers
Died of exposure
Survived
Survived
Survived
Survived

Ballot seaman in life boat #1 of the Induna March 30th
Larangeira, Avelino Fireman Portugal died in this lifeboat


SS BEACONLIGHT
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: Panama Transport Co.(Standard Oil of New Jersey)
Master: Urban A. Haughan
Built: Alameda, CA 1920
Gross Tons: 6926
Dimensions: 453' x 56' x 33'
Capacity: 74,722 bbls

The Panamanian flag tanker, SS BEACONLIGHT, was torpedoed by the German U-160 (Georg Lassen) at 0316 ship time on July 16, 1942 while en route from Cape Town (departed June 21) to Trinidad in ballast unescorted. Armament consisted of a 12 pound gun aft and 2 machine guns (.30 cal.) one on each side of the bridge.
On board was a merchant crew of 39 plus 2 British gunners.The majority of the crew were American citizens. One crew member, an A.B., was lost.
A torpedo struck the tanker on the starboard side between #8 and #9 tanks. Position of the attack was 10-59 N./61-07 W. or about 10 miles NW Galera Point, Trinidad. About 5 minutes later a 2nd torpedo struck on the same side in the engine room. The extent of the damage was not known as the ship began to sink immediately. The ship had to be sunk by the Dutch ROODE ZEE, to prevent her being a menace to navigation.
The crew abandoned ship in three lifeboats. They were picked up about 0900 by a small passenger vessel, the SS TRINIDAD, and landed at Port of Spain around 1700.

The U-160 (v. Pommer-Esche) was sunk south of the Azores (33-54 N./27-13 W.) by aircraft from the USS SANTEE (CVE- 29) on July 14, 1943. There were no survivors.

U.S. MERCHANT LOST
Peter DOBISH
 
A.B.
The names of the survivors can be found in the book
"SHIPS OF THE ESSO FLEET IN WORLD WAR II."


MS BUCHANAN
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: lsbrandtsen SS Co.
Master: Arthur Jensen (40) Danish
Built: Odense, Denmark 1939
Gross Tons: 5614
Dimensions: 466' x 58' x 25'
Former Name: LEXA MAERSK (Danish)

The freighter, MS BUCHANAN, ex MS LEXA MAERSK, was purchased by the War Shipping Administration on August 4, 1941 and immediately turned over to the Grace Line on a Bareboat Charter in the port of Baltimore and placed under the Panamanian flag. The charter to the Grace Line fell through so the ship was awarded to the American Export Line under a GAA charter on August 1, 1941 at the port of Baltimore. Export Line operated the ship until October 23, 1942 when she was turned over to the Isbrandtsen SS Company at the port of New York under the same type of agreement. This company was operating the ship when she was lost.
The MS BUCHANAN was torpedoed by the German U-224 (Hans-Carl Kosbadt) at 1935 GCT on November 12, 1942 in position 53-06 N./25-54 W. while en route independently from New York to Liverpool with a cargo of fuel oil in special tanks, 5000 bags of U.S. Mail, and a deck load of aircraft and invasion barges. She was making a speed of 15 knots and although not zigzagging at the time of the attack she had previously been on zigzag patterns.
The complement of the BUCHANAN consisted of 73 persons. A merchant crew of 46, 15 Navy Armed Guard, and 12 passengers who were members of a U.S. Army Air Corps Unit. All hands survived but several had to be hospitalized for exposure. Nine of the crew were U.S. citizens.
On November 16, the MS LIGHTNING picked up survivors in one boat containing 10 crew, 5 U.S. Navy gunners, and 3 passengers. They were landed at Liverpool on November 21st. HMS LEAMINGTON picked up another boat load of survivors on November 20 and took them to Londonderry, N.I. In this boat were 10 crew members, 5 U.S. Navy gunners, and 2 passengers. HMS CLARE picked up the other two boats on November 21 and took them to Londonderry arriving the 22nd. These boats contained 26 crew members, 5 Navy gunners, and 7 passengers.
A torpedo struck the ship on the port side at #5 hold. The entire port side in the area of #4 and #5 holds was blown out. The two hatches were ablaze. The propeller shaft was broken stopping the engine. A 2nd torpedo fired after the ship had been abandoned which struck in the forepeak. The ship remained on an even keel finally sinking about 2100 GCT on the same day as the attack.
The ship was abandoned in 4 boats. They remained at the spot of the attack until the morning of the next day (13th) when the Master ordered the boats to set sail and head for Ireland but a strong wind blew up separating the boats.

U.S. MERCHANT CREW SURVIVORS
CUMMINGS, John B. (21)
FOX, Thomas (25)
GABBARD, Elisha M. (30)
HERNANDEZ, Rufus (29)
NIEVES, Benjamin (20)
QUASDORF, Alvin M. (54)
SMITH, John (35)
VISCONT1, Albert (20)
YUSKA, Elmer (20)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
BLIVENS, Daniel H.
BRUBAKER, Ross W.
COVEY, Harold C.
DANIELS, Benjamin C.
DEMPSEY, John R.
DeBOURGH, JOHN H.
FANSLOW, Chester H.
FRANK, Harold E.
GARRETT, Wayne O.
GAULT, Carl H.
GEORGE, Charles
GREEN, Robert W.
JOHNSON, Hollis H.
TRINKLE, Stephen
WILES, Rufus C.
 
Eng. Cadet
Utility
O.S.
Messman
Deck Cadet
Radio Op.
Utility
Engine Cadet
Deck Cadet
 

Slc
Lt. (jg.)
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
GM3c
S2c

New York City
Jersey City, NJ
Franklin, OH
Moca, P.R.
Brooklyn, NY
No address
Yonkers, NY
Orange, NJ
Chicago, IL

















The U-224 (Kosbadt) was sunk on January 13, 1943 while attempting to break through the Straits of Gibraltar into the Mediterranean Sea. The sub was destroyed by HMCS VILLE de QUEBEC in position 36-28 N./00-49 E. There was only one survivor who was rescued and taken prisoner.


SS BUSHRANGER
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: Alcoa SS Co.
Master: Martin Strandley (Lost) U.S. citizen
Built: Sunderland, England 1922
Gross Tons: 4536
Dimensions: 377' x 53' x 24'
Former Names: (a) STAKESBY: (b) STARCK:(MARIA THORDEN)

The coal burning freighter, SS BUSHRANGER, was seized by the U.S. while under the Danish flag on June 6, 1941 under an Executive Order.
The SS BUSHRANGER was torpedoed by the German U-107 (Harald Gelhaus) in position 20-20 N./81-30 W. at 2030 EWT on May 31, 1942 while en route from a port in Dutch Guiana to Key West for orders via St. Thomas, with a full cargo of Bauxite. The ship was unescorted although there was a Naval (U.S.) Armed Guard aboard.
The BUSHRANGER had left New York with a full load of general cargo for South American ports. She left St. Thomas on May 26th. The date leaving New York was April 6, 1942.
On board was a complement of 44 men, 37 merchant crew and 6 U.S. Navy Armed Guard. Seventeen (17) merchant crew were lost, 11 of them were American citizens. No Navy men were lost.
No boats were launched due to the rapid sinking of the ship. Four rafts were cut loose. Crew members jumped overboard and got aboard the four rafts. Six of them clung to a floating vegetable bin which had floated free. These six eventually climbed on a raft on which was the Chief Mate. This raft was picked up June 7th by a U.S. Navy Catalina and the survivors taken to Kingston, Jamaica.
The four rafts stayed together for three days but on the 4th day, the raft in charge of the Chief Mate disappeared. The other 3 rafts containing 19 survivors were picked up by the USCG NIKE on June 12 in position 21-00 N./83-30 W. and taken to Key West.
Survivors on these three rafts reported that on June 5th at 0200 EWT during good visibility, a large plane circled three times, dropped a flare and then disappeared to the west.
The periscope of the sub was first sighted at 1040 EWT but it disappeared. At 1655 EWT, the tracks of two torpedoes were seen crossing the starboard bow close to the ship. At this time the Master commenced zigzagging and sent out three SSS warnings but received no answer.

The U-107 (Fritz) was sunk on August 18, 1944 west of La Rochelle by RAF Squadron 201. Position 46-46 N./3-39 W. There were no survivors.


AMERICAN MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
CODY, William
CONNON, John Thomas
DYKSTRA, Henry
HOOPER, Fred
KACHULIS, Peter
MAXWELL, John A.
MENDEZ, Francisco
PRESTO, Geacome
STRANDLEY, Martin
TIERNEY, Martin
VERNON, Robert Louis

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
COLTON, S.H.
de ROSELA, Manuel
GUSTIN, Rene
FRENCH, R.
MITHUS, Einar
SCOTT, James

AMERICAN MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
CERKO, Anthony
CIERPIESS, Anthony W.
COSTELLO, Eugene
COVELL, Daniel J.
ERICSON, Harry
MILLER, Vincent F.
POKORNY, Joseph
SCHEUERMAN, J. Dean
TILLBERG, Joseph T. (40)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
McKEON, William F.
MONARD, Philip F.
SMITH, Euzema, Jr.
STANTON, Oliver
TYNDALL, Edward
WILDER, Arthur B.


Fireman
A.B.
O.S.
Bosun
Coal Passer
Chief Engr.
Messman
A.B.
Master
Oiler
Chief Steward


3rd Mate
Fireman
1st Engr.
Oiler
Oiler
2nd Mate


Messman
O.S.
Coal Passer
A.B.
Fireman
Messman
2nd Cook
A.B.
Coal Passer


A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
Cox.



Hawthorne, CA

Brooklyn, NY







British
Portuguese
Belgian
Canadian
Norwegian
British








Brooklyn, NY
New York City







Unfortunately, the crew list does not show the addresses of those listed. The crew list for this ship was of poor quality, making it very difficult to decipher the names. This was common with most Panamanian flag ships during WWII.


MS C.O. STILLMAN
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: Panama Transport Co. (Standard Oil of N.J.)
Master: Daniel H. Larsen
Built: Vegesack, Germany 1928
Gross Tons: 13,006
Cargo Capacity: 163,145
Dimensions: 584' x 75' x 44'

The Panamanian flag tanker, MS C.O. STILLMAN, was torpedoed by the German U-68 (Karl-Friedrich Mertens) at 2115 ship time on June 5, 1942 while en route alone, from Aruba to New York with a cargo of 125,812 barrels of Fuel Oil and 39 tons of dry cargo, in position 17-30 N./68-20 W. or about 60 miles SW of Puerto Rico.
On board was a merchant crew of 47, 8 U.S. Naval Armed Guard, and 3 Workaways from other tankers. Three (3) crew members were lost.
The first torpedo struck on the starboard side abaft the midship house setting the after end of the house on fire. The Master ordered the ship stopped and for the men to abandon ship. About 2135 EWT another torpedo hit the ship on the starboard side forward of the engine room showering the deck with fuel oil and debris. At that time those remaining aboard jumped over the side and climbed aboard rafts. The ship sunk 2 minutes after the 2nd torpedo hit.
The ship was abandoned in #3 and #4 lifeboats and 4 rafts. There were 25 survivors on the 4 rafts consisting of 22 crew and 3 Navy gunners. They were rescued by Coast Guard Patrol Boat #83310 on June 7th just before dark after being notified by an Army plane which had spotted the rafts. They were landed at Ponce, P.R. at 0500 on June 8, 1942 and repatriated on the SS SEMINOLE.
Those in the two boats drifted until the dawn of June 6 and then set sail for the Dominican Republic. Boat #3 with 17 survivors landed at the Bay of Yuma. Boat #4 with 13 survivors landed at La Romana.
U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
FINN, Lawrence C.
LANG, John P.
WICKLINE, George T.

2nd Engr.
A.B.
Pumpman

Names of surviors can be found in the book,
"SHIPS OF THE ESSO FLEET IN WORLD WAR II."

The U-68 (Lauzemis) was sunk on April 10, 1944 north of Madeira 33-25 N./18-59 W.) by aircraft from the USS GUADALCANAL (CVE-60). There was only one survivor rescued by the U.S. Navy. 56 were lost.



SS CAPIRA
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: United States Lines
Master: Ejnar Jensen (36) Danish
Built: Seattle 1920
Gross Tons: 5565
Dimensions: 431' x 54' x 28'

The SS CAPIRA, was Time Chartered by the War Shipping Administration at 11:25 AM on March 19, 1942 in the port of Boston from the United States Line.
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS CAPIRA, was torpedoed by the German U-609 (Klaus Rudloff) at 0610 ship time on
August 31, 1942 in position 57-11 N./33-45 W., while en route in Convoy SC-97 from New York to Glasgow with general cargo including trucks, tractors, steel mats, bull dozers, and 250 bags of U.S. Mail.
On board the CAPIRA was a merchant crew of 41 and a U.S. Naval Armed Guard of 13. Four (4) crew members were lost. There were 3 Americans in the merchant crew. None were lost.
At 0605, the MS BRONXVILLE (Dutch), which was located about 4 points off the starboard bow of the CAPIRA, was torpedoed. The alarm bell on the CAPIRA sounded and all hands were ordered on deck. Five minutes later a torpedo struck the CAPIRA at #4 hold on the starboard side near the after end of the engine room. Flooding of those spaces occurred at once. The ship began to settle by the stern sinking around 0625.
The ship was abandoned under orders from the Master. Three boats and two rafts were lowered to the water. One boat capsized. Those in this boat got aboard other boats and rafts. At 0615, the rescue ship SS PERTH, picked up 33 survivors from Lifeboats #1 and #2 and a raft. A Corvette, name unknown, picked up 16 men from wreckage and a raft. All were landed at Gourock, Scotland on September 6th.

The U-609 (Rudloff) was sunk February 7, 1943 in position 55-17 N./26-33 W. by the Free French Corvette LOBELIA, ex HMS K-05. There were no survivors.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
CARAS, James (20)
HIGGINS, Thomas (36)
TRAVIS, James B. (21)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
RAVELLA, James A.
BARBER, William L.
CAMPBELL, John L.
CATOE, James W.
CHASTAIN, Lawyal J.
DeCHANTSREITER, JOHN G.
DeHAVEN, Woodrow W.
DUDLEY, Alvin D.
FREEMEN, Wilham L.
HERTEL, Mathew
REID, Benjamin F.
RICKS, Benjamin F.
VAN BUSHKIRK, Lester K.

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
Thomas KINNEAR (56)
Thomas MITCHISON (42)
Carmelo CUTEGAR (25)
Young Foo CHING (49)

Deck Cadet
Fireman
Engine Cadet


Lt. jg
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
Slc


Chief Engr.
2nd Engr.
Oiler
Ch. Cook



Chappaqua, NY

















England
England
Malta
China


SS CARDINA
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: Bulk Carriers, Inc., 80 Broad St., New York, NY
Master: Einar Falnes (Norwegian)
Built: Seattle 1919
Gross Tons: 5586
Dimensions: 427' x 54' x 28'
Former Names: (A) DEUEL (b) CAPAC

The Panamanian flag freighter, SS CARDINA, was torpedoed by the Italian submarine ARCHIMEDE (G. Gazzano) at 1245 local tirne on June 15, 1942 in position 4-45 N./40-55 W. or about 500 miles NE of Salines, Brazil, while en route from Buenos Aires to New York with a cargo of 7000 tons of Linseed in bulk. She was unescorted and unarmed and not zigzagging.
She carried a crew of 34 and all survived. Among the crew were 17 Americans.
The first torpedo hit at 1245 on the port quarter at #5 hold. The explosion caused the CARDINA to take an immediate list. The crew abandoned ship a few minutes later. When the ship did not appear to sink all hands returned to the ship within an hour. After a few repairs, the engine was started and the ship got underway. About 1730 local time the engines were stopped and the crew abandoned ship again.
It was at this time the ARCHIMEDE fired another torpedo which struck on the port side tearing a huge hole in the hull. In addition, the sub surfaced and commenced firing her deck gun. Three direct hits were made on the ship's hull.
The ship was abandoned in four boats. The Master ordered all boats to head for the Brazillian coast. On June 22nd landfall was made at Salines. From there they were taken to Para (Belem) aboard the SS COMMANDANTE RIPPER where they arrived at 1000 on June 23rd. Seventeen of the crew were repatriated to Miami on June 8th via aircraft. The remainder were flown to Miami July 21st on a USAAF plane.
U.S. SEAMEN SURVIVORS
ALLEN, Harold L.
ADAMS, Kenneth J.
BERNARD, John T.
CUMMINGS, Charles H.
ELLISON, C. William
FREGAN, Donald H.
GILLEDGE, Jean G.
GORDON, George M.
LESSMAN, John T.
LIGHTELL, Oscar J.
LINDQUIST, Roy G.
MANN, Arthur G.
PATTON, Roy
STACKI, Theodore
TAYLOR, Lester
TROUTMAN, Donald B.
WILLIAMSON, Edwin
Bosun
A.B.
Ch. Engr.
2nd Engr.
Utility
A.B.
Utility
Fireman
3rd Engr.
Wiper
O.S.
1st Engr.
Oiler
Oiler
Messman
A.B.
Wiper
Madison, WI
No. Bergen, NJ
Uniondale, PA
Gayton, GA
New Orleans,LA
Fitchburg, MA
Augusta, GA
Atlanta, GA
Brooklyn, NY
New Orleans, LA
Rockford, IL
Norfolk, VA
Mobile, AL
Dunkirk, NY
Rockford, IL
Duncannon, PA
no address
The ARCHIMEDE was sunk by U.S. Navy aircraft on April 15, 1943 in position 3-23 S./30-28 W. which is about 350 miles NE of Natal, Brazil. Casualties known.
The CARDINA was transferred to the Panamanian flag on 3/21/40.


SS CASTILLA
Home Port: Tela, Hondulas
Company: United Fruit Co.
Master: Davis B. Kerr - American (Lost)
Built: Belfast, N. Ireland 1927
Gross Tons: 3910
Dimensions: 342' x 48' x 28'

The SS CASTILLA, was Time chartered to the War Shipping Administiation on June 2, 1942 at 0400 in the port of Mobile.
The Honduran flag freight and refrigerator ship, SS CASTILLA, was torpedoed by the German U-167 (Harold Gelhaus) at 2110 CWT on June 6, 1942 in position 20/15 N./83-18 W. while en route from Mobile to Kingston, Jamaica with a cargo of flour.
On board was a complement of 59 men consisting of 50 crew members, 7 U.S. Naval Armed Guard, and two passengers. A total of 22 crew and 2 Navy gunners were lost. Twenty-three of those lost went down with the ship. One man died in a lifeboat and was buried at sea.
One torpedo struck on the port side just forward of #3 hatch. An uncontrollable fire broke out 5' to 6' below the water line in #3 hatch. The ship settled by the head at once with a list to port and then settled by the stern and sank with the bow straight up. She sank so quickly there was no time to launch the lifeboats, only time to release 4 rafts.
The 35 survivors were picked up by the USCG NIKE (WPC 112), after 6 days on the rafts, on June 12 in position 21-03 N./83-30 W. They were landed at Key West.
The U-167 (Kurt Sturm) was depth-charged off the Canary Islands by RAF Sqdr. 233 in position 27-47 N./15-00 W. on April 5, 1943. The next day, April 6th, the crew scuttled the U-167 and were rescued by the U-455 and U-518. They were landed in Spain and eventually returned to France.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
KERR, Davis. B.
POWLS, Palmer
BRUCKLAND, Harold
BENFOLD, Edward
KENNEDY, John
KRASNICKI, Adam
SCHOLF1ELD, John

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
COOPER, Furman C.
DEWEESE, Richard C.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
COFER, Cecil Cary
DOWNIE, William Max
FERRARA, Michael
FERRELL, Harold Warren
GUEST, Walter Cleon

Master
2nd Mate
Radio Oper.
1st Engr.
2nd Engr.
Jr. 3rd Engr.
Chief Steward


AS
AS


AS
AS
AS
Coxswain
AS
Yonkers, NY

















NOTE: Crew list for the "CASTILLA" was not available.


SS CARMONA
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: Bulk Carriers, Inc., 80 Broad St., New York, NY
Master: Charles Beke (U.S. citizen)
Built: Long Beach, CA 1919
Gross Tons: 5496
Dimensions: 427' x 54' x 27'
Former Names: (a) WEST KASSON (b) CUZCO

The Panamanian flag freighter, SS CARMONA, was torpedoed by the German U-160 (Georg Lassen) at 1127 local time on July 18, 1942 in position 10-58 N./61-20 W. (SE of Trinidad) while en route from an Argentine port to a U.S. port with a cargo of 7138 tons of Linseed. The ship was sailing alone and unarmed.
On board was a crew of 35 men. Four were killed outright by the explosion of the first torpedo that wrecked the engine room.
The CARMONA was struck by 4 torpedoes, all striking on the starboard side. The first hit at 1127 just aft of midships wrecking the engine room. A 2nd hit at #2 hatch about 10 minutes later. The 3rd and 4th hit about 5 minutes later. The ship turned on her side and sunk at ! 200 noon.
The Master ordered abandon ship after the first torpedo struck. Two boats were launched. The survivors were picked up by a U.S. Navy Patrol Boat which was about 2 miles inshore of the CARMONA when she was hit. The name of the Navy ship is not known. The survivors were transferred to the USS YPC 68 and taken to Port of Spain.

The U-160 (von Pommer Esche) was sunk south of the Azores by aircraft from the USS SANTEE (CVE-29 on July 14, 1943. There were no survivors.

U.S. SEAMAN LOST
LAMB, Amherst H.

U.S. SEAMEN SURVIVORS
BEKE, Charles
CLARK, Carleton (23)
DOBAL, Alfred
KING, William (35)
RILES, Zelah (31)
SMITH, Ralph

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
KESKITALO, Also
CASPARD, Michael J.
CASPERSEN, Emil

3rd Engr.


Master
2nd Engr.
Messman
1st Engr.
Radio Oper.
Fireman


Oiler
Wiper
Fireman

Newburgh, NY










Finland
Trinidad
Norway


SS CHARLES PRATT
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: Panama Transport C. (Standard Oil of N.J.)
Master: Eric R. Blomquist
Built: Newport News, VA 1916
Gross Tons: 8982
Capacity: 119,410
Dimensions: 516'x 68'x 38'

The Panamanian flag tanker, SS CHARLES PRATT, was torpedoed without warning by the German U-68 (H-G yon Stockhausen) at 1455 local time on December 21, 1940 in position 8-26 N./16-51 W. while en route from Aruba to Freetown with a cargo of 96,069 barrels of Fuel Oil. This attack took place almost a year before Pearl Harbor. The PRA TF was about 220 miles from Freetown, Sierra Leone. She was unarmed and flying the flag of a neutral nation. At the time of the attack in broad daylight, the flag of Panama was flying from the stem, the stack was marked with the Panama Transport insignia, and the Panamanian flag was painted on both sides of the hull.
The ship was manned by an American crew of 42 men. Two of the crew were lost. On October 20, 1939 the registry of this ship was changed from the U.S. to Panama but kept the American crew.
The first torpedo hit on the starboard side at #6 tank blowing out the bulkheads in #6 main tank and #4 summer tank and also the deck plates in the way of the pumproom. The explosion showered oil and debris clear to the top of the mast and over the boat and poop deck. The ship caught fire at once and burning oil flowed into the starboard alleyway. Steam smothering lines were opened but to no avail as all lines were destroyed in the pumproom.
As the fire was gaining, the Master ordered abandon ship.Lifeboats #2 & #4 were launched. After the ship had been abandoned a second torpedo struck just forward of the midship house blowing burning oil and debris several hundred feet in the air and showering the ocean with oil and steel fragments, some just missing #2 boat. This explosion put out the fire. The Chief Mate was picked up 40 minutes after the ship was abandoned by #2 boat which was in charge of the Master. He had been blown overboard by the explosion along with an Ordinary Seaman. The Chief Mate suffered various injuries including a broken leg. The Ordinary Seaman was never found.
Lifeboat #2 was picked up on December 25th at 1350 local time by the MV GASCONY and landed at Freetown. Boat #4 was picked up by the SS LANGLEEGORSE on December 26th and landed at Freetown.
U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
DOUGHERTY, Patrick
DUFFY, Duffy

O.S.
Wiper
The names of survivors can be found in the book
"SHIPS OF THE ESSO FLEET IN WORLD WAR II."

The U-65 was sunk on April 28, 1941 by HMS GLADIOLUS (K-34) in position 60-04 N./15-45 W. Commanding Officer of U-65 was Joachim Hoppe. There were no survivors.


SS CHENANGO
Company: Moore-McCormack Line
Master: Alfred Rasmussen (37) U.S. Citizen (Lost)
Built: West Hartlepool, England 1918
Gross Tons: 3106
Former Names: (a) WAR HAMLET (b) KURIKKA

The CHENANGO, was seized by the U.S. from the Finnish Government and turned over to the War Shipping Administration at the port of New York at 1000 EST on December 27, 1941. On December 30th the ship was turned over to Moore McCormack Line at 1200 Noon EST for operation under a GAA agreement.
The coal burning freighter, SS CHENANGO, was torpedoed by the German U-84 (Horst Uphoff) at 1900 EWT on April 20, 1942 in position 36-11 N./75-07 W. (about 60 miles SE of Cape Henry), while en route, alone and unarmed, from Rio de Janiero to Baltimore via St. Thomas with a full load of Manganese Ore at a speed of 9 Knots.
One torpedo hit on the port side between #4 & #5 hatches blasting a huge hole in the hull. Combined with the full load of heavy ore this cased the ship to go down in less than a minute.
On board was a crew of 32 men. This crew was made up of 12 different nationalities, a regular United Nations. There were Americans, Danes, Norwegians, Estonians, Swedes, Chileans, French, Portuguese, Canadians, Colombians, Belgians, and Irish in the crew. Of these 32 men there was only one survivor, a 24-year-old Fireman from Ireland. Thirteen of the lost were American citizens.
The Fireman was one of two men who managed to reach a liferaft which had floated free when the ship sank. One boat was launched but it capsized. The other boat went down with the ship. The raft on which the two men found themselves had been condemned in New York. All the regulation rafts on the ship had been improperly stowed on deck instead of in quick release racks. When the ship sank, these rafts were destroyed. The only supplies on the raft was water and a fishing line. The two survivors were on the raft for 12 days.
The raft that had been condemned in New York, holding the two exhausted and starving men, was sighted by a U.S. Army plane on May 2nd at 0800 in position 34-30 N./74-25 W. At 1400 on the same day, they were rescued by a Coast Guard PBY aircraft. For nearly two weeks the men had seen nothing but sea and sky plus those patrol planes that passed within a half mile of the bobbing raft.

The U-84 (Uphoff) was sunk August 26, 1943 by aircraft (VC-13) from the USS CORE (CVE-13) in position 27-00 N./37-03 W. There were no survivors.

AMERICAN SEAMEN LOST
AKESSON, Johan (48)
COLON, Eduardo (28)
HERAGHTY, Patrick (34)
HUTSON, Arthur T. (37)
MAURITZEN, Svend (24)
MILLEY, John (57)
MYRVOLD, Albert (45)
PEREZ, Placid F. (50)
RAMOS, Alfred (23)
RASMUSSEN, Alfred Hans (37)
RODRIGUEZ, Carlos (19)
SMITH, Harry G. (42)
VILAR, Julius (29)

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
PEDERSEN, Holger (30)
HOLLEKIN, Sverre (26)
VERCAMMEN, Louis (31)
DEBOUGE, Louis (39)
LAMEND, Nikolai (20)
OAD, John (31)
TADURAN, Felomino (28)
ELLINGSEN, Sverre (40)
OKESON, Emil (48)
RIETVELD, Ferdinand (47)
HERNANDEZ, Charles (40)
WALKER, Roy H. (21)
STEINBERG, Johannes (37)
PERSSON, John (21)
MOHAMED, Hedad (39)
deARANJO, Francisco (44)
TOUTANT, Jean (26)
BRIONES, Luis (45)
SANTACRUZ, Antonio (47)
MEIRELES, Antonio (29)
DIELTINS, Joseph (42)
ARRILLAGA, Marcas (45)
SWIGGERS, Eugene (35)
SERVERIUS, Albert (26)

3rd Engr.
O.S.
2nd Mate
A.B.
2nd Cook
Ch. Engr.
3rd Mate
1st Engr.
Coal Passer
Master
O.S.
O.S.
Coal Passer


Ch. Mate
Radio Oper.
Bosun
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
O.S.
2nd Engr.
3rd Engr.
Oiler
Oiler
Oiler
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Coal Passer
Chief Steward
Chief Cook
Messman
Messman


Spring Valley, NY
New York City
Brooklyn, NY
Columbia, SC
West New York, NJ
Union, NJ
No address
New Orleans, LA
Brooklyn, NY
No address
New York City
No address
New York City


Denmark
Norway
Belgium
Belgium
Estonia
Estonia
Philippines
Norway
Sweden
Belgium
Chile
Canada
Estonia
Sweden
France
Portugal
Canada
Chile
Colombia
Portugal
Belgium
Spain
Belgium
Belgium

There is some question whether or not Arthur Hutson was on the ship when it was torpedoed. Maritime Insurance files show he was a casualty and war risk insurance was paid to his wife. A crew list made up and sent to the home office shows he was not aboard when the ship left St. Thomas.

Statement of TERRANCE J. BRADLEY, sole survivor of the SS CHENANGO

We were about six days out from St. Thomas when the torpedo hit. I was in my quarters in the forecastle with three other AB's and an Ordinary Seaman plus a Fireman. The lights went out and we were thrown around the room. We ran forward and up the escape hatch to the poop deck where we were covered in water up to our waist. I was the first one out and I don't know what happened to me but I think I was drawn under by the suction of the ship as it sank. I did not have a life jacket on.
In about half an hour I got on a raft which floated near me.I swam to the raft and got aboard. No one else was on it.
A few minutes after I got on the raft, Joseph Dieltins, the Chief Steward, swam to the raft and I helped him aboard. A few minutes later one of the Estonian A.B.'s was swimming toward our raft but when he was within 25 yards of the raft, he just disappeared under the water. Another Estonian A.B. was clinging to a hatch cover some distance from the raft. I don't know what became of him.
The 2nd Engineer, Sverre Ellingsen, was holding on to a hatch cover as the sub cruised among the men in the water and I heard him cursing the U-Boat. Carlos Rodriguez, an O.S., was cfinging to a hatch cover and screaming. I did not see any of them go under the water nor did I see any other member of the crew at this time. We were the only ones who got on the raft. A heavy sea was running and there was an offshore wind which reached gale force by morning.
The following morning I could not see any wreckage or bodies and the gale was still blowing. The raft started to break up. Dieltins and I had to keep working to keep it together.
There was no food on the raft, only a water keg holding about 10 gallons. There were no oars, no sail, and no anchor. This raft had been condemned in New York and the equipment and provisions from that raft had been placed on the other rafts on the CHENANGO.
Four or five days later, we had some calm weather for 2 days. There was a line on the raft with a hook on it. I baited this with a crab which we got in sea weed. I managed to catch a large fish about 5 feet long and weighing about 100 pounds. Before I could get this fish on the raft, a shark took half of it. We tried to eat some of it but it made us sick.
On the second calm day, Dieltins started to go crazy. He wanted to make a cake and acted as if he was preparing the meals on the ship. A few days later he lay down on the raft and would not get up. I gave him water from time to time. He talked as if he were insane.
We did not see any ships but several planes passed close by. About the 11th day a U.S. Army plane dropped us some food in a rubber bag. We both had some chocolate.
The next morning, the plane was back again and circled overhead for 4 or 5 hours. It dropped a small package but it was too far away for us to reach it. Then I must have gone to sleep for awhile because the next thing I knew a Coast Guard PBY flew over us, dropped smoke bombs, and then landed and taxied toward the raft.
Finally a line was thrown from the plane which I made fast to the raft. At this time, Dieltins jumped overboard and I had to pull him back on the raft. As the plane neared the raft, several men grabbed both of us, Dieltins first and then me, taking us aboard the plane. We were taken to the Marine Hospital in Norfolk and placed in the same room on Saturday afternoon. On Monday morning, Mr. Dieltins died in that room.
The Master, Rasmussen, was a very strict skipper. He had ordered the ship blacked out even before sunset. We were zigzagging too, making about 8 knots when we were hit. The CHENANGO went down very fast after the torpedo hit, easily within a minute.

Signed by: Terrance James Bradley   July 7, 1942



SS COLD HARBOR
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: U.S. Lines, Inc., New York, NY
Master: Lauritz Bartho (30) Norwegian
Built: Hog Island, PA 1920
Gross Tons: 5015
Dimensions: 390' x 54' x 28'

The Panamanian flag freighter, SS COLD HARBOR, was torpedoed by the German U-502 (Jurgen von Rosenstiel) at 2210 EWT on June 14, 1942 while en route from New York to Persian Gulf ports with a cargo of 6200 tons, including 28 tanks, airplanes, and ammunition. She had left New York on May 24th in convoy and then spent several days anchored in Chesapeake Bay awaiting another convoy to Trinidad. While the convoy was located between Yucatan and the Panama Canal she was ordered to proceed to Trinidad alone.
The ship's complement consisted of 42 crew members of many nationalities including 4 Americans. Also on board was a U.S. Naval Armed Guard contingent of 10 men. Six crew members were lost, one of them lost on the SS KAHUKU, the ship that rescued the survivors but was herself torpedoed. Three of the Navy men were lost, one of them from the SS KAHUKU. No Americans in the merchant crew were lost.
As the ship proceeded to Port of Spain and while in position 11-40 N.762-55 W. (about 100 miles NW of Trinidad) a torpedo struck the ship on the starboard side just forward of the bridge. The explosion caused the ammo in #2 hold to blow up. The ship took a heavy list to starboard. About a half hour later another torpedo struck on the port side between #4 and #5 hatches. About 15 minutes after this, the ship sank port side up.
The Master ordered abandon ship about 10 minutes after the first torpedo as the ship still had headway. He waited for the engines to stop before giving the order. Three boats and two rafts were launched. #1 boat was destroyed by the explosion. The Master, Chief Engineer, and Radio Operator remained aboard until the 2nd torpedo hit. The Chief Engineer was blown overboard by the force of the 2nd explosion. The Master then launched the starboard after raft and climbed aboard. He picked up 2 survivors from the water and at daybreak picked up five more including the Chief Engineer and Radio Operator. This raft was picked up at 1300 on the 15th by USS OPAL PC-453 and taken to the American Naval Base and then to Port of Spain.
Two boats, containing 19 survivors were picked up by the SS EXMOUTH about 24 hours after the attack. They were taken to Port of Spain also. The 3rd boat, containing 14 crew and 3 Navy men was picked up on June 15th by the SS KAHUKU. At 2120 EWT on June 16th, the KAHUKU herself was torpedoed. A crew member and Navy gunner from the COLD HARBOR were lost at this time. The 15 survivors from the COLD HARBOR were among those rescued by the USS OPAL and landed at Trinidad.
U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
ARMOUR, Mark (20)
McKENZIE, Colin (24)
MURPHY, Paul (20)
WALDRON, James

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
CONNELLY, Willard F.
FRANKLIN, Martin R.
HOCH, Christopher R.
LORENZEN, Richard A.
MAHR, John S.
MANLET, Albert M.
RUNYAN, W.A.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
LIEN, Kenneth F. (lost KAHUKU)
LIVESAY, Ernest S.
MARRIOT, Herbert L.

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
HAN, Sh York
HEYLIGERS, Johannes
JOLLOW, William
LUNDGREN, Rune (Lost KAHUKU)
PEERS, Thomas
REIBIN, John

Cadet
Wiper
Cadet
Wiper


AS
AS
AS
AS
AS
AS
Ensign


AS
AS
AS


Messman
Oiler
A.B.
Fireman
Ch. Steward
4th Engr.

Newburgh, NY
New York City
Yonkers, NY
New York City
















China
Dutch
Canadian
Swedish
English
Canadian


MS COLIN
Company: A.L. Burbank & Co.
Master: Herbert E. Byng (British)
Built: Piombino, Italy 1921
Gross Tons: 6255
Former Name: VILLAPEROSA ex Italian

The MS COLIN, ex MS VILLAPEROSA, was taken over by an Executive Order on June 6, 1941. On October 31, 1941 she was delivered to the U.S. Maritime Commission and thence to the War Shipping Administration. The WSA allotted the ship to Lykes Bros. SS Co. on January 15, 1942 at the port of New York. On December 8, 1942 she was turned over to A.L. Burbank & Co. under a GAA agreement in Mobile.
The Panamanian flag freighter, MS COLIN, was torpedoed by the German U-S59 (Johann Jebsen) at 1550 ship time on April 26, 1944 while en route from New York to Liverpool via Boston and Halifax in Convoy SC 157 (#135) with a cargo of 4600 tons of bulk sulphur. The position of the attack was 54-16 N./31-59 W.
The total complement on board was 40 merchant crew and 15 U.S. Navy Armed Guard. One crew member jumped overboard and was not seen again. He was the 2nd Cook, a Chinese citizen.
The COLIN loaded sulphur at Port Sulphur, Louisiana and left on February 15 in convoy for New York arriving there on February 29th. After receiving orders, the ship proceeded to Boston arriving there on March 10th. She left Boston March 17th in Convoy BX 100 for Halifax arriving March 19th. Sailed from Halifax in Convoy SC 156 but due to engine trouble was forced to return to Halifax. Finally sailing from Halifax on April 19th in Convoy SC 157.
On April 26, 1944 at 1550 ship's time, two torpedoes struck the COLIN on her port side, one hit at #1 hatch and the other at #6 hatch. The sulphur cargo in #1 hold caught fire immediately and the fumes covered the ship. The COLIN settled gradually on an even keel. Shortly after all the boats were clear, a 3rd torpedo hit the ship on the port side amidships. When the smoke cleared, the ship had disappeared.
At the time of the attack, the ship was proceeding alone on the Straggler's Route having dropped out of the convoy the night of April 24 because of a broken steering gear.
At 1620 orders to abandon ship were given by the Master. Two lifeboats and a gig were launched along with all the rafts except one. All the survivors were picked up by HMS AFFLECK (K 462) and HMS BENTLEY (K 465) at 1130 on April 27th. All the survivors were in two boats at this time. After rejoining the convoy they were all transferred to the rescue ship SS ACCRINGTON arriving Gourock, Scotland on May 1st. They were repatriated to the U.S. on the ILE DE FRANCE arriving New York on May 18th.

A historical sidelight you might find interesting, the VILLAPEROSA was in port in Wilmington, NC, loading scrap iron when Italy declared war on Britain and France (June 1940). She was interned by the US Government, pulled away from the loading dock and tied up to pilings in a deserted part of the Cape Fear River at Eagles Island, across from the City of Wilmington. The Italian crew remained aboard. Sometime later, if my memory serves me correctly, the crew opened the sea cocks and attempted to scuttle the ship. Their effort was only partially successful as there was very little water under the hull and the ship simply settled a few feet into the mud. She was raised in a matter of hours and eventually made serviceable again.

Richard Bowden Jones
USMM Veterans WWII, Wilmington, NC


U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
WELSH, James E.
MURISON, Richard
BOOKLAND, William F.
HEADEN, Thomas
WATSON, Billy E.
GRACE, Frank
FINDLEY, John C.
JAMESON, Paul H.
SMITH, Harold A.
DRIGGERS, Charles A.
PACE, Herman A.
KIMBRO, Johnnie R.
OSBOURNEM, Joseph

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
NAVICKAS, S.R.
POTTER, William
DALY, Eugene R.
COPE, John
GINDA, Joseph
HARTMAN, John
HOOD, L.M.
LUKASIK, Vincent
MARTIN, William
PIAQUADIO, John
POINTER, Willard
PULKA, John
STEENBERGEN, Gerald
TENDELL, Thomas
TREADWELL, William

2nd Mate
Radio Oper.
Purser
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
O.S.
Oiler
Wiper
Wiper
Ch. Steward
Messman
Messman


Ensign
GM 3c
GM 3c
S lc
S lc
S lc
S 1c
S lc
S lc
S lc
S lc
S lc
S lc
S 1c
S lc
Rockford, IL
Brooklyn, NY
Staten Is, NY
Jasper, Tx
Vinton, LA
Baltimore, MD
Collins, GA
New Orleans, LA
Kansas City. KS
Tampa, FL
West Monroe, IL
Nashville, TN
Chickasaw, AL

















The U-859 (Jebsen) was sunk in the Straits of Malacca (5-40 N./100-04 E.) by the British submarine HMS TRENCHANT on September 23, 1944. There were 20 survivors, 12 of whom were taken prisoner.



SS COMAYAGUA
Home Port: Puerto Cotez, Hon.
Company: United Fruit Co.
Master: Peter J. Larsen
Built: Newburgh, NY 1921
Gross Tons: 2496
Dimensions: 317' x 42' x 23'
Propulsion: Oil - Twin screw

The Honduran flag freighter, SS COMOYAGUA, was torpedoed by the German U-125 (Ulrich Folkers) at 1100 CWT on May 14, 1942, in position 19-00 N./81-37 W. (about 14 miles W. by S. of Georgetown, Grand Cayman) while en route alone from Puerto Barrios, Guatemala to Niquero, Cuba in ballast.
The COMAYAGUA was armed with a 4" gun aft and two .30 caliber machine guns, one on each bridge wing. A U.S. Naval Armed Guard crew of four were aboard to man the guns.
The COMAYAGUA carried a merchant crew of 38 men. Six crew members were killed outright by the explosion of the first torpedo. A seventh man, the Jr. Engineer, was badly burned and died later in the hospital at Georgetown. One Navy gunner was badly burned but survived.
The ship was struck by 2 torpedoes, the first hitting at 1100 just forward of midship and the 2nd at 1120 which hit about 20' from the stern. The first hit in the boiler room and the 2nd blew off the stern.
The crew abandoned ship in boats and rafts. A U.S. Navy plane appeared at 1145 and tried to locate the sub but with no success. It then flew off to Georgetown where the pilot dropped a note in the Commissioner's garden, informing him of the survivors. The Motor Schooner CIMBOCO was sent to pick up the survivors and returned them to Georgetown.
The U-Boat surfaced after the sinking and the Master was questioned by the German officer who spoke excellent English. He told the Master land was only 10 miles away.
O. Thomas Wolfe, GM 3c, in charge of the gun crew, stayed at his post hoping the sub would surface. When he saw the 2nd torpedo approaching he jumped overboard and was picked up.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
MacDOUGAL, Archie
MURPHY, James E.
THOM, Robert

U.S. MERCHANT CREW SURVIVORS
LARSEN, Peter J.
KRONENBERGER, Jerome
LeJEUNE, Elwin
PEET, Everett J.
CAMAILLO, Ernest H.
DePAUW, Gustave H.
QUICK, Edgar W.
McCHAIN, Robt. R.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
ARCHER, George
BEAVERS, Donald
GREEN, Elias G.
WOLFE, Oscar T.

Jr. Engineer
3rd Asst. Engr.
Ist Asst. Engr.


Master
Chief Mate
2nd Mate
3rd Mate
Ch. Engr.
2nd Engr.
Radio Op.
Ch. Stew.


S 2c
AS
S 2c
GM 3c



















Charlotte, NC
Donald Beavers, AS, was badly burned but survived.He was flown to the Naval Operating Base at Guan-tanamo, Cuba via U.S. Navy plane for hospitalizationwhere he recovered. The other four merchant crew members lost were all Honduran citizens. They were a Wiper, Fireman, Oiler,and Messman.

NOTE: Unfortunately, the file on this ship does not show the address of the American merchant crew members or their next of kin.



SS DESERT LIGHT
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: Alcoa SS Co.
Master: Charles B. Dunn (American)
Built: W. Hartlepool, England 1903
Gross Tons: 2231
Dimensions: 313' x 43' x 19'
Propulsion: Coal - Single screw
Former Names: (a) NIREFS (b) DIAMONDO (c) PANDIA

The Panamanian flag freighter, SS DESERT LIGHT, ex Finnish PANDIA, was taken over by the U.S. from the Finnish Government on December 27, 1941 at the port of New York, under an Executive Order of June 6, 1941. The ship was allotted to the War Shipping Administration which in turn allotted the ship to Alcoa SS Company for operation on February 6, 1942 at New York. The ship had been under the flag of Panama since August 1941. When confiscated by the U.S., the ship was operated by a Finnish company owned by Arthur Karlsson.
The SS DESERT LIGHT, was torpedoed by the German U-572 (Heinz Hirsacker) at 1203 EWT on April 16, 1942 in position 35-35 N./72-48 W. while en route from New York to Bermuda with a cargo of 3800 tons of supplies for the Naval Operating Base, including 104 tons of ammunition and dynamite. She was sailing alone and unarmed.
Two torpedoes ripped into the starboard side of the ship amidships just forward of the boiler room. The explosion blew out the bottom plates and tore the side of the hull up to the deck. Extensive damage was done to the midship house and the bulkhead holding the coal bunkers was ruptured. The engine room and fireroom quickly flooded causing the ship to sink at 1323 EWT. Also the starboard boat was destroyed by the explosion.
On board the DESERT LIGHT was a crew of 31 men. One Fireman was lost.
The ship was abandoned at 1223 by all hands in the port boat and the port raft. Five men left on the raft and 25 men were in the boat. Later, those on the raft transferred to the boat. They were finally rescued at 1200 on April 23rd by the USS ROPER DD 147 and taken to Morehead City, N.C.

The U-572 (Heinz Kummetat) was sunk by U.S. Navy aircraft Vp-205 on August 3, 1942 in position 11-35 N./54-05 W. There were no survivors.
U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN LOST
CLEMENT, Lorenzo Fireman
NOTE 1: (There was no crew list for this ship)
NOTE: Captain Dunn had to sign three crews before he could get one to sail the ship. After one crew learned that the ship carried explosives they refused to sail and signed off. A second crew was signed on but they too refused to sail and signed off. On the third try the company found it necessary to get most of the crew from Canada in order to take the ship to sea. (From official U.S. Navy records).


SS EL COSTON
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: U.S. Navigation Co.
Master: Rolf S. Olsen (Lost)
Built: Tacoma, Wash. 1924
Gross Tons: 7286
Dimensions: 445' x 57' x 27'
Former Name: BIENVILLE

The SS EL COSTON, was purchased by the U.S. Government from the Southern Pacific RR and turned over to the War Shipping Administration for operation. The WSA assigned the ship to the U.S. Lines on July 2, 1941. This company operated her until October 30, 1942 under a GAA agreement. On that date the ship was assigned to the U.S. Navigation Company and registered under the flag of Panama in Boston.
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS EL COSTON, on February 25, 1944 at 2135 ship's time, while en route in Convoy CU-15 (#53) from New York to a United Kingdom port, rammed the tanker SS MURFREESBORO which was loaded with 80 octane gasoline. The collision occurred in position 38-10 N./53/33 W. (About 900 miles out from New York).
The EL COSTON was loaded with 3367 tons of munitions, 267 tons of vehicles, and 311 tons of general cargo.
On board the EL COSTON was a crew of 39 and a U.S.Navy Armed Guard contingent of 28. The merchant crew was made up of many nationalities including 3 Americans. Nine of the crew and 8 Navy men were lost.
The EL COSTON, 3rd ship in the 5th column, had drifted off course towards the 4th column of ships. At 2130 the Master ordered the wheel hard right to get back in position. It was at this time that the helmsman reported the rudder failed to respond. This caused the EL COSTON to ram the U.S. tanker SS MURFREESBORO on her port side.
The tanker was in convoy position #54. The tanker burst into flames at once and sheets of flame swept the decks of both ships. At the time the weather included rough seas, rain squalls, and poor visibility.
The Master was on the bridge at the time of the collision and was last seen descending from the bridge shortly after the collision. He was not seen again after that time.
With the Master missing, the Chief Mate of the EL COSTON, ordered the ship to get underway at slow speed and proceeded in an easterly direction until daylight, at which time a survey was made of the damage. The bow was found to be stove in above and below the waterline. #1 hold was flooded and boxed ammunition was floating out through the holes. The ship did not sink at this time but stayed in the vicinity until about 1535 on February 26th when she departed under her own power with an escort, USS MARCHAND (DE 249), headed for Bermuda. However, the weather turned bad with the wind increasing to Force 7 to 8 from the North and Northwest causing heavy seas. Shortly after midnight, February 27th, the bulkhead between #1 and #2 holds gave way and collapsed. The engines were stopped and abandon ship was ordered. Those on board abandoned in two lifeboats. The ship sank by the head at 0142 on February 27th.
Six crew members and 8 Naval Armed Guard were lost the night of the collision. Three more crew members were lost when the ship finally went down. None of the 3 Americans were lost.
NOTE: The Chief Mate, Sten A. Nordh, was awarded the Distinguished Merchant Marine Medal on May 3, 1945 for his actions in taking charge of the EL COSTON after the Master was lost.
U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
AMAN, Leo E.
BENNETT, Ralph H.
HARDEN, Hubert L.
HILL, William R.
LOWE, Lloyd G.
PANNULLO, John G.
SANTANA, Robert H.
VACCARO, Gus F.

U.S. MERCHANT CREW SURVIVORS
BOCHOW, John P. (38)
JURGEN, William H. (18)
HUFF, Norbert H. (26)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
BALE, Sanford Lt.
BOCKJORST, Carl E.
BO JAR, Edward W.
CARLSON, Donald A.
DUFFY, Daniel J.
EDDY, James P.
FOLEY, Howard J.
GRAD, William H. (lnj.)
HARRELL, Alton W.
KRUSA, John A. (lnj.)
LAIRMORE, Bobbie K.
LIGHT, John J.
ORLANDO, Patrick V.
TIEDEMANN, Herbert E.
URBANSKI, Wallace L.
USTIN, David A.
VOGEL, Oscar M.
PALUMBO, Peter R.

FOREIGN SEAMAN LOST
OLSEN, Rolf S.(lived 85th St. Brooklyn)
LARRASQUITU, Antonio
TANAVA, Rail
BLOMKVIST, Niles
OMER, Herman
FRANKINOVILLE, Karl
KENG, Tu Chow
NG, Chuen
CHEUNG, Chau
The last three crew members were lost when the ship sank on Feb. 27th.


GM 3c
S lc
S lc
S lc
S lc
S lc
GM 3c
Cox.


Purser
Fireman
Jr. Engr.


Lt.(jg)
Slc
Slc
Slc
S1c
S1c
S1c
S1c
S1c
SM3c
GM3c
Slc
Slc
Slc
S1c
Slc
GM3c
S1c


Master
2nd Mate
3rd Mate
A.B.
Carpenter
4th Engr.
A.B.
3rd Cook
Messman















Woodside, NY
New Britain, CT
Dayton, OH






















Norway
Spain
Estonia
Sweden
Belgium
Belgium
China
China
China





SS EL CAPITAN
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: U.S. Lines
Master: John E. Therik (49) Norway
Built: Newport News, Va. 1917
Gross Tons: 5255
Dimensions: 364' x 51' x 24'

The SS EL CAPITAN, was purchased by the U.S. Government from the Southern Pacific RR. She flew the American flag until October 1, 1941 when she was transferred to Panamanian registry. On June 26, 1941 the ship was turned over to the U.S. Lines to be operated under a GAA agreement at the port of New York.
The EL CAPITAN was bombed by German aircraft at 0600 July 10, 1942 in position 70-10 N./41-40 W. (about 65 miles NE of lokanka, USSR). She was en route from New York to Archangel with a cargo of machinery, food, leather, ammunition in the holds and tanks on deck. This ship had been a ship in Convoy PQ-17 before the convoy was dispersed and forced to go it alone.
The German aircraft were first sighted at 2300 GCT on July 9th. They had come from Petsamo where there was an air base. Concussion from the many bombs dropped caused the after peak compartment to break open. The bulkhead at #4 hold was ruptured, and the starboard side of the engine room was demolished. Holds #4 and #5 began to take water and the ship settled by the stern.
The ship was abandoned when it became apparent that she was in a sinking condition.
On board the EL CAPITAN was a merchant crew of 37, a U.S. Naval Armed Guard of 10 enlisted men and one officer. Also on board were 19 survivors from the SS JOHN WITHERSPOON rescued by the EL CAPITAN. All on board were rescued with no fatalities. There were no Americans in the Merchant crew.
HMS LORD AUSTIN, a converted trawler, picked up all the survivors and took them to Archangel. From there they were taken to Glasgow, Scotland where they embarked on the SS QUEEN MARY arriving in Boston on October 15, 1942.
It was necessary for the LORD AUSTIN to sink the EL CAPITAN with gunfire.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
MARKS, Louis
COMMER, Ward L.
CUTCHENS, Leonard L.
DAILEY, George B.
DUFF, Melvin W.
JAMES, Harold J.
ROBERTS, Donald E.
ROMANO, Pasquale A.
SHELBY, Joseph D.
RICHARDS, Floyd E.

Lt. (jg)
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
S2c
RM2c
SMlc


SS EL LAGO
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: U.S. Lines
Master: Finn Abrahamson (Norwegian)
Built: Arlington, NY 1920
Dimensions: 387' x 53' x 27'

The freighter, SS EL LAGO, was an American flag ship owned by the Southern Pacific Railroad. She was purchased from this company by the U.S. Government on June 26, 1941 at Baltimore. At this time the ship was placed under the Panamanian flag to be operated by the U.S. Lines under a GAA agreement.
The SS EL LAGO was torpedoed by the German U-615 (Ralph Kapitsky) and the U-607 (Ernst Mengersen) at 1512 local time on October I 1, 1942 while en route from Reykjavik to New York in ballast. The position of the attack was 44-00 N./40-00 W.
On board the ship was a complement of 39 crew members, 14 U.S. Naval Armed Guard, and 6 passengers who were merchant seamen being repatriated. The Master and 1st Assistant Engineer were the only survivors, only because they were taken prisoner by the U-615.
The EL LAGO had left New York on August 20 arriving Boston the next day. After loading cargo she left Boston on August 30 in Convoy BX-35 and arrived Halifax September 1st. Left Halifax on September 5 in Convoy SC 99 arriving Reykjavik on September 17.
After discharging all her cargo at Reykjavik, the SS EL LAGO departed from that port on October 5, 1942 in Convoy ONS 136s. The convoy was made up of 12 ships in two columns. The EL LAGO was the #3 ship in the port column and the convoy was heading south to join a larger convoy from the U.K. to the U.S.
When about 250 miles south of Iceland, on October 5th, the convoy ran into a storm with hurricane force winds, tremendous heavy seas, rain, poor visibility. The EL LAGO was forced to slow down because of these weather conditions thereby losing the convoy. At noon on October 11th, observations fixed the position of the ship at 442 miles ENE of Cape Race, New-foundland at a speed of 13 knots.
On this day, at 1512 local time, the ship was struck by two torpedoes amidships, one on the port side and the other on the starboard side. The stern section sunk within seconds and the forward sank in less than a minute.
The ship was equipped with four lifeboats, 4 square rafts, and two donut type rafts. Both after boats were destroyed in the explosion and the two forward boats went down with the ship.
The Master was on the bridge at the time of the attack. The ship sank under him. Without his life jacket he managed to stay afloat for about half an hour and then climbed aboard one of the square rafts. When he got aboard he found the 2nd Mate, 1st Engineer, Bosun, Carpenter, an A.B., an O.S., the 2nd Cook, and a Messman. All of them had been in the water for some time and were covered with oil. The Master also saw 2 men clinging to a potato crate plus 3 others on one of the square rafts and 2 more on another. The two donut rafts were empty. As there were too many on the Master's raft, 3 men shifted to an empty raft.
At this time, the two subs surfaced. They were the U-615 and U-607. The U-615 approached the rafts and asked for the name of the ship and for the Master. The Master identified him-self and he was ordered aboard the sub. They they asked for the Chief Engineer. When told he was not among them they asked for an engineer officer. The 1st Engineer then identified himself and he was ordered aboard too.
The Master asked the Commanding Officer of the U-615 what he intended to do with the others on the rafts. His only answer was, "This is war!" He then ordered the two below. The Master judged the time to be about 1715 at this time. No survivors were ever found so it can be assumed they died from exposure or drowning.
The U-615 arrived at La Pallice, France on October 30th. Captain Abrahamson was taken to the prison at La Rochelle and the Engineer to a hospital in Bordeaux suffering from severe burns. Captain Abrahamson was transferred to a prison camp for Merchant Seamen at Bremen. He was repatriated to the U.S. from Oslo, Norway on the Liberty ship SS M.E. COMERFORD on July 30, 1945 arriving in New York on August 16th where he reported to U.S. Lines office.
The Engineer was hospitalized a La Rochelle for 14 days and then taken to Bordeaux where he remained until December 20, 1942. He was then returned to La Rochelle, placed in prison for 2 days, and then taken by train to Camp Marlag in Bremen where he was reunited with Capt. Abrahamson. He was repatriated to the U.S. from Rotterdam on August 29,1945 aboard the SS MORGANTOWN VICTORY arriving in New York on September 7, 1945.
Capt. Abrahamson was a Norwegian citizen from Kristiansand where his wife was living. Mr. Baas, the 1st Engineer, was a Dutch citizen but lived with his wife in New York City.
The U-615 (Kapitsky) was sunk south of Curacoa in position 12-51 N./64-34 W. on August 7, 1943 by U.S. Navy aircraft and U.S. Army Sqdn. #10. Five were lost and 43 taken prisoner.
The U-615 under the command of Ralph Kapitsky, was responsible for the sinking of the American tanker SS ATLANTIC SUN from which there was one survivor also. The U-615 pulled this man aboard and made him a prisoner thereby saving his life.
The U-607 (W. Jeschonnek) was sunk NW of Cape Ortegal, Spain in position 45-02 N./9-14 W. on July 13, 1943 by British Sqdn. #228. There were 45 lost and 5 taken prisoner.
The U-607 under the command of Ernst Mengersen, was responsible for the sinking of the SS EDWARD B. DUDLEY, an American Liberty ship. There were no survivors from the DUDLEY.
The Merchant crew was made up of 7 Norwegians, 8 Chinese, 5 Canadians, 5 Belgians, 3 Dutch, 2 Swedes, 2 Scots, and one each from Denmark, Ireland, Estonia, Portugal, Latvia, Poland, and the U.S.
U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
CONROY, Edward Terrance (23)
MANION, Earl S. (27)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
SCHAFFER, James M.
CAGLE, James T.
CARNEY, Dale L.
CLARK, Charles F.
FAULKNER, Howard R.
FISHER, James C.
GHANN, Robert C.
GRAHAM, George M.
GREGORY, John E.
KOENIG, Emil A. **
PANTOL, Casimir F.
SAPIENZA, Joseph J.
TUTEN, Walford C.
WARD, Donald E.

O.S.
Oiler


Ensign
S 2c
S 2c
AS
S 2c
S 2c
AS
AS
AS
S 1c
S 2c
S 2c
S 1c
S 2c

New York City
Mobile, AL
















**The body of this man was picked up at sea on November 3, 1942 by the USS MANHASSET in position 51-10 N./40-50 W.

LOG ENTRIES RELATIVE TO THE SINKING OF THE SS EL LAGO SIGNED BY THE COMMANDING OFFICER OF THE U-615, KPLTN. KAPITSKY.

October 11, 1942
1113 While on the surface, smoke sighted bearing 085 True.
1130 Ship sighted 6 miles distant on course about 230. Speed 12 knots. Increase speed to get into attacking position.
1456 Fired two torpedo spread from Tubes #1 and #1. Hit after 90 seconds. Observed ship to be cut in two. After 4 minutes nothing could be seen of the ship.
NOTE: There is a discrepancy in the time of the attack. The Master of the EL LAGO stated the ship was hit at 1512.
1500 Heard diesel noise bearing 210 True... noise becomes louder. Noise determined to be that of another U-Boat.
1542 Surfaced. Found U-607 at scene of sinking. U-607 departs heading 060 True. Captain of ship and 1st Machinist taken on board. Steer 050 True to return to former position.
1836 Radio message to U-Boat headquarters: "In AJ 8898, EL LAGO sunk, bound from Iceland to New York in ballast.Captain and I st Machinist on board."

Signed: Kapitsky, Kptin.

Author's Note: Unfortunately, I have been unable to determine or identify the six seamen passengers. There is no record of them in any government files. Therefore it is impossible to know if any of the six were American seamen.
All of the data concerning the attack and rescue was obtained from statements of Capt. Abrahamson and Gerritt Baas after their repatriation to the United States. The Master's statement was signed on August 21, 1945 and Mr. Baas' on September 13, 1945.


SS EL OCCIDENTE
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: U.S. Lines
Master: Olaf Nannestad (Norway)
Built: Newport News, Va. 1910
Gross Tons: 6009
Dimensions: 405' x 53' x 27'

The freighter, EL OCCIDENTE, was purchased by the U.S.Maritime Commission from the Southern Pacific Railroad at Galveston, Texas on July 7, 1941. The ship was assigned to the U.S. Lines of New York on the same date at 1400 under a GAA agreement.
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS EL OCCIDENTE, was torpedoed by the German U-435 (Seigfried Strelow) at 0130 local time on April 13, 1942 in position 78-28 N./28-30 E. while en route from Murmansk to New York via Reykjavik in Convoy QP-10. She was carrying a part cargo of Chrome Ore as ballast.
The EL OCCIDENTE had previously left Boston on January 30th stopping at Halifax on February 1st and departing from there on February 7th in Convoy HX 174. After arrival at the Clyde River she left there on February 23rd arriving Reykjavik on the 29th. Departed that port on March 1st arriving Murmansk March 13th and departing there on April 10th in Convoy QP-10. From Reykjavik to Murmansk she was in Convoy PQ-12. The ship was armed and manned by British gunners.
There were 41 crew members on the ship. Twenty (20) were lost. The ship sank so fast there was no time to launch lifeboats. The crew was forced to jump overboard. About 30 minutes later, the 21 survivors were picked up by HMS SPEEDWELL, a British minesweeper. The SPEEDWELL also picked up 9 bodies and buried them at sea. Survivors were landed at Reykjavik from where they were eventually repatriated to the U.S. aboard the SS CAPULIN and SS ARTIGAS.
One or two torpedoes struck the ship in the engine room nearly breaking her in two. She sank stern first in two minutes. One boat was put in the water but it overturned.

The U-435 (Strelow) was sunk by British Sqdn. (RAF) on July 9, 1943 in position 39 -48 N./14-22 W. There were no survivors. (48 lost).

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN LOST
BENNETT, Alvin (50)

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN SURVIVOR
HAXTON, Thomas (51 )

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
BLACK, Alexander (33)3rd
BOON, Hong (60)
DaSILVA, Geraldo
DAVIS, Kenneth (38)
DeCAMARGO, A.C. (28)
DePATER, Pieter (28)
DOWNING, Daniel (29)
DRISCOLL, M.
GOUGH, William (33)
GREENE, Ronald (17)
HENRIQUES, Ernesto (45)
LINN, Hong Yen (26)
LYNCH, Neil (31)
PRONK, M. (25)
SKYNER, Ernest (49)
SPITTAL, William (33)
TOMLINSON, George T. (18)
Van den EYNDE, Marcel (19)
Van de PUTTE, Henry (40)

4th Engr.


Chief Engineer


Engineer
2nd Cook
Oiler
Carpenter
Wiper
A.B.
Wiper
Fireman
Fireman
Messman
Wiper
Utility
2nd Engr.
A.B.
Ch. Steward
Fireman
Frieman
A.B.
Messman

Port Arthur, TX


Brooklyn, NY


England
China
Portugal
England
Brazil
Belgium
Canada
England
England
England
Panama
China
England
Holland
England
Canada
Canada
Belgium
Belgium

Detail info about M(aarten) Pronk can be found at the Netherlands War Graves Foundation


SS EQUIPOISE
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: International Freighting Co.
Master: John Anderson (51) (Lost)
Built: Genoa 1906
Former Names: (a) CHANDA (b) PIETRO CAMPANELLA

The SS EQUIPOISE, ex Italian flag freighter PIETRO CAMPANELLA, was a coal burning ship, delivered to the War Shipping Administration, by Executive Order, on September 11, 1941 at 1200 hours in the port of Baltimore. The WSA assigned the ship to the IFC to be operated under a GAA agreement in the port of Baltimore at 1201 EST on October 6, 1941. She was changed to Panamanian registry on October 25, 1941.
The SS EQUIPOISE, a Panamanian flag, coal burning freighter, was torpedoed by the German U-160 (Georg Lassen) at 1834 EWT on March 26, 1942 in position 36-36 N./74-45 W. (about 60 miles Southeast of Cape Henry), while en route from Rio de Janeiro to Baltimore with a cargo of 8000 tons of Manganese ore. The ship was sailing alone and not zigzagging.
The EQUIPOISE had left New York on January 17, 1942 with a load of general cargo stopping at Norfotk on the 19th and leaving there on the 23rd. Arrived at Rio de Janeiro on February 25th and left on March 5th.
On board was a merchant crew of 54 men including the Master. The ship was armed with a 4" gun on the stern plus two machine guns on the bridge and two on the stern. There was no Navy Armed Guard aboard. The members of the crew had been trained to man these guns. Of the 54 men aboard only 13 survived. Among the crew were 8 American seamen. None of the eight Americans survived.
One torpedo struck the ship on the starboard side between #1 and #2 hatches, blowing out the bottom of the ship, causing her to sink in about 2 minutes. Also the nature of the cargo added to her rapid sinking. The two starboard boats went down with the ship.
Two port lifeboats were launched plus 2 rafts. Lifeboat #2 capsized when it hit the water. The aft boat, #4 boat, was launched by the 3rd Mate and another seaman. After it was launched, they could not reach it and had to jump overboard. The 3rd Mate, who was the only surviving officer, said he was in the water for 2 hours before he could finally climb aboard this boat. When he got in the boat, he found 7 men. One of them was the Master. He was badly injured and not coherent. The 3rd Mate said he always spoke English on the ship but at this time he spoke in Swedish. The Master died the next morning and was buried at sea. Another seaman got aboard the boat soon after the 3rd Mate. After the Master died, there were 8 survivors in the boat.
For two days the boat and two rafts floated aimlessly on the open sea before help came in sight. Those in the boat were picked up first at 1630 EWT on March 28th by the USS GREER (DD-145). On the same day, between 1700 and 1800, those on the rafts were rescued. There were 4 men on one raft. On the other raft was one man and the body of the Carpenter. The survivors were taken to the Norfolk Naval Base arriving there at 0200 on the 29th. Seven of them had to be hospitalized.
The crew was made up of seamen of many nations including Norway, Sweden, Estonia, Latvia, Brazil, Lithuania, Hungary, Poland, Portugal, Denmark and the United States.
One of the survivors, a Fireman, said the confusion after the torpedo hit was very intense among the crew. They could not understand one another. Orders were either misunderstood or disregarded. Most of the men lost went down with the ship.

The U-160 (Pommer-Esche) was sunk south of the Azores (33-54 N./27-13 W.) by aircraft from the USS SANTEE (CVE 29) on July 14, 1943. There were no survivors.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
ANDERSON, John
BAILEY, Lester
CALLOZA, Francisco
HANSMAN, Ruben
LUCAS, Orville
McCLAFFERTY, Huge
MIRANDA, Enrique
SANCHEZ, Julio

Master
O.S.
Messman
Coal Passer
Radio Operator
Coal Passer
Coal Passer
Messman
The original crew list for this ship is missing from CoastGuard files. Therefore, the ages and addresses of theabove men are not available. The age of the Master was found in the 3rd Mate's testimony.
FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
GUNDERSEN, Gunvald
THARALDSEN, Lars
GUNDERSEN, Erling
NODELAND, Hallvard
HJELMKRANS, Sture
ELIASSEN, Peter
VALEN, Leif
BJERKE, Olaf
DANSLITH, Rolf
JORGENSEN, Ole
BRINGELAND, Haakon
SORENSEN, Haakon
JENSEN, Thorbjorn
HAAVASTER, Johannes
ANDREASSEN, Karl
KRASTINS, Jamis
TRUHPONEN, Simon
SILVA, Roseback
ANDERSEN, Oskar
HUTTUNEN, Veijo
ZANKOWSKI, Sefan
HULTBERT, Tage
SIEPA, Carol
KRISTIANSEN, Kart O.
COIMBRA, Carlos
LINDHOLM, Henrick
EKHOLM, Edward
FRAGA, Manuel *
ESTEVES, Antonio *
HOVDEN, Hjalmar *
CARVALHANA, Antonio*
SIUDA, Kazimierz *
* Signed on in Rio de Janeiro.

Norway
Norway
Norway
Norway
Sweden
Norway
Norway
Norway
Norway
Norway
Norway
Norway
Norway
Estonia
Norway
Latvia
Finland
Brazil
Norway
Finland
Lithuania
Finland
Hungary
Norway
Portugal
Finland
Finland
Portugal
Portugal
Norway
Portugal
Poland



MS ESSO BOLIVAR
Company: Panama Transport Co.(Standard Oil of New Jersey)
Master: James M. Stewart (Lost)
Built: Kiel Gaarde, Germany 1937
Gross Tons: 10,389
Cargo Capacity: 128,894 barrels
Dimensions: 506' x 70' x 37'

The Panamanian flag tanker, MS ESSO BOLIVAR, was shelled an torpedoed by the German U-126 (Ernst Bauer) at 0230 on March 7, 1942 in position 19-38 N./74-38 W. or about 30 miles SE of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, while en route from New York to Aruba with a load of fresh water, commissary stores, and a deck cargo. The ship did not sink but was badly damaged. Eventually repaired and put back into service.
On board was a merchant crew of 44 and a U.S. Naval Armed Guard contingent of six. Seven crew members, including the Master and Chief Mate were lost. One Navy gunner was lost. Ten crew members were wounded as were four of the Navy men.
The ESSO BOLIVAR left New York on February 26th armed with a stern gun and two .30 caliber machine guns. A stop was made at Newport News for routing instructions from the Navy and to test the degaussing system. She departed there on March 1st, unescorted for Aruba.
At 0230 the ship was attacked by vicious shelling from U-126. Seven crew members were killed and many wounded. About two hours after the initial attack, a torpedo struck on the starboard side blowing part of the deck cargo several hundred feet in the air. She took a heavy list to port but stayed afloat.
Shells struck the after house, wheelhouse, and the midship house. The 3rd shell exploded in the afterhouse starting a fire in the galley which soon spread and blazed upward like a flaming torch driving the gun crew from the after gun. Bulkheads caved in from the intense heat.
The engines were stopped at 0310 with the steering gear shot away. The deck cargo of acetylene cylinders were shattered by shellfire setting the gas on fire. The torpedo made a hole 50' x 35' next to the pumproom.
The ship was abandoned in #1 lifeboat and four of the rafts.The lifeboat picked up survivors in the water. All survivors were picked up by the minesweeper USS ENDURANCE and taken to Guantanamo Naval Base where all the wounded were hospitalized.
On March 25th, the ship left Guantanamo under her own power with a Naval escort, arriving Mobile on March 30th where permanent repairs were completed on July 24th. On August 6th, she loaded a full cargo at Corpus Christi, Texas for New York.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
DALEY, John
FUDSKE, Hawkins
SCARDORA, Henry H.
STEWART, James M.
VAUGHT, Basil E.
WILSON, Irving C.
ZAWISTOWSKY, Boleslau

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
CREPS, Lawrence R.

Messman
Chief Mate
Messman
Master
O.S.
Oiler
2nd Cook


AS

The U-126 (Siegfried Kietz) was sunk by RAF Squadron 172 in the North Atlantic (46-10 N./11-23 W.) on July 3, 1943. There were no survivors.

The Chief Mate, Hawkings Fudske, Chief Engineer William McTaggart, Arthur Lauman, Fireman, and Charles Richardson, A.B. were all awarded the Merchant Marine Distinguished Service Medal for their bravery in the attack on this ship. Mr. Fudske's award was made posthumously to his wife. A Liberty ship was also named for him.

The names and position of the merchant crew and Naval Armed Guard survivors can be found in the book,
"SHIPS OF THE ESSO FLEET IN WORLD WAR II."


MS FIRETHORN
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: U.S. Lines
Master: Paul F. Schultz (Danish) Lost.
Built: Nakstov, Denmark 1937
Gross Tons: 4700
Former Name: NORDEN (Danish)

The MV FIRETHORN, ex Danish NORDEN, was taken over by the U.S. Government, under an Executive Order, in the port of Philadelphia on July 12, 1941 and registered under the Panamanian flag. Control of the ship was given to the War Shipping Administration. They assigned this ship to the U.S. Lines under a Bareboat Charter on July 17, 1941 and on February 26, 1942 under a GAA agreement.
The Panamanian flag freighter, MS FIRETHORN, was torpedoed by the German U-172 (Carl Emmermann) at 0830 ship's time on October 7, 1942 about 60 miles NW of Capetown, while en route alone, from New York to Suez via Capetown with a cargo of tanks and general war supplies.
The ship's complement consisted of 40 merchant crew and 21 U.S. Naval Armed Guard. Of that number, 10 crew members and 2 Navy gunners were lost. There were only two members of the merchant crew who were American citizens, the Deck and Engine Cadets. They were both lost.
The first torpedo struck the ship on the port side just below the bridge, tearing open the hull. A 2nd torpedo struck, a few seconds later, on the same side in the engine room. The ship went down in less than 2 minutes.
Abandon ship was sounded after the explosion of the first torpedo. Survivors climbed aboard four rafts. The port boat had been destroyed in the first explosion. Due to the heavy port list to port it was impossible to launch the starboard boat. The four rafts broke loose and floated free as did a yawl boat. The yawl was found bottom up but was righted and used to pick up many survivors in the water and place them on the rafts which were eventually lashed together.
Six men manned the yawl boat and set forth for the coast. The following day, November 8th, they were spotted by a plane about 1300. On the same day at 1700, they were picked up by HMS ROCKROSE (K-51). The next day the survivors on the rafts were rescued by HMS ROCKROSE and a mine sweeper. They were taken to Capetown arriving the same day, November 9th.

The U-172 (Hoffman) was sunk west of the Canary Islands in position 26-19 N./29-59 W. on December 12, 1943 by four U.S. destroyers. There were 46 survivors including the Commanding Officer. Thirteen were lost.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
NAUMANN, Robert S. (21)
RAVELLA, Louis J. (19)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
BENOIT, Roy H.
HEINS, Lee O.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD
BERKELEY, Robert H.
ALLEN, John L.
BEDIBELL1, Ernest H.
BOIETTE, Ed
BURTON, Ferris H.
BYRD, Harmond B.
CRANE, George H.
ELLIS, Wade B.
FISHER, Alfred
LUCAS, James R.
PEPPEL, John N.
PEYSAR, Luther E.
PHIPPS, Henry T.
ROLLINS, Leonard T.
SEAWELL, Ernest K.
SMITH, Charles B.
SMITH, Robert C.
STANDISH, Chester A.
ZINN, Edward A.

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
FREDERIKSEN, F.E.
HANSEN, Asmus C.
LAGENDYK, Cornelius
NOLIS, Bernard
PAT, Hung
SCHULTZ, Paul F.
SORENSEN, Arnold W.
TAVARES, Armando
DOVER, John (38) ***
KORREN, John (47) *** ,

Deck Cadet
Engine Cadet


S 2c
S 2c


Lt. (jg)
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c
S lc
S 2c
S lc
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c
S lc
S lc
S 2c


Ch. Steward
1st Engr.
Oiler
Oiler
2nd Cook
Master
Ch. Engr.
Messman
3rd Mate
Jr. Engr.

Chicago, IL
Philadelphia, PA






(Lost on MS ZAANDAM)


(Lost on MS ZAANDAM)



(Lost on MS ZAANDAM)


(Lost on MS ZAANDAM)




(Lost on MS ZAANDAM)


(Lost on MS ZAANDAM)


Denmark
Denmark
Holland
Belgium
China
Denmark
Denmark
Portugal
Canada
Russia

***These two seamen lost on the MS ZAANDAM while being repatriated to the U.S.

Nico Hoogendam (Dutch), A.B. on the FIRETHORN, survived 82 days on a raft after being torpedoed on the ZAANDAM. Surviving with him were 2 others. Cornelius Van der Slot (Dutch) ZAANDAM crew member and Basil lzzi, U.S. Navy Armed Guard stationed on the ZAANDAM. (See Page 667)


SS FRIAR ROCK
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: Waterman SS Co.
Master: Eric G. Stolt (Lost)
Built: Trieste 1921
Gross Tons: 5141
Dimensions: 404' x 54' x 29'
Former Name: ARSA (Italian)

The SS FRIAR ROCK, was a steel hulled, single screw freighter with reciprocating engines, Scotch boilers, and burned oil.She was seized by the U.S. Government on June 6, 1941 under an Executive Order. On October 11, 1941, the War Shipping Administration assigned the FRIAR ROCK to Waterman SS Company at the port of New York under a GAA agreement.
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS FRIAR ROCK, was torpedoed by the German U-130 (Ernst Kals) at 0748 GCT on January 13, 1942, while en route from New York to England, unarmed and unescorted, with a full load of cargo. The attack took place about 110 miles Southeast of Cape Race, New-foundland in position 45-30 N./50-40 W.
On board was a merchant crew of 37 men. Of this number, 31 men were lost. There were 8 American seamen in the crew.Six of them were lost. Seven survivors were picked up by an unidentified ship. One of them, the 2nd Mate, died ashore.
There is no record of who the rescue ship was or to what port the survivors were taken. Also no record of how long in a boat or raft or what date they were rescued.
The FRIAR ROCK was one of those unfortunate ships to be lost early in the war and being under the Panamanian flag not much attention was given to this ship. Therefore, little is known about its loss. Fortunately, the Coast Guard files contained a copy of the crew list thereby we are able to identify the crew. This was so important as we try to find the names of American seamen lost on these foreign flag ships.
The ship was under the command of Eric G. Stolt, a 48-year-old Swedish native living with his wife and family in Newark, N.J.

The U-130 (Keller) was sunk west of the Azores on March 12, 1943 by the USS CHAMPLIN DD-601 in position 73-10 N./40-21 W. There were no survivors.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
DAWSON, George A. (37)
GAINES, Thomas H. (24)
KALINOWSKI, Joseph ,J. (31)
MILLER, Abram (22)
PETERSON, Hans (41)
STOLT, Eric G. (48)

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
FINCH, Willie J. (38)
WOLD, Philip (38)

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
STAERMOSE, Lief (26)
OLSEN, Harold (37)
LIASKAR, Alf (38)
THOMBERG, Karl E. (44)
KARLON, Arthur (47)
LANDSTROM, Sven (51 )
PINO, Piere (21)
HANSEN, F.H. (38)
KOZAR, John (28)
RITCHIE, John M. (56)
HARVEY, David (44)
Dos SANTOS, Moyses (34)
PELADEAU, John (36)
McLEOD, Alex K. (32)
MAGNUSON, Oscar (42)
RYAN, Harold (21)
PAIXIO, Salation (26)
HUGHES, Trevor (26)
WIZEN, Robert (52)
ROSS, Wallis S. (21)
FELICIO, Jose (42)
DeQUEO, Flavio A. (23)
MOREIRA, Jose (31)
FRIERE, Antonio (34)
MUNGA, Elis (52)

A.B.
A.B.
O.S.
A.B.
3rd Mate
Master


Chief Engr.
O.S.


Ch. Mate
2nd Mate
Carpenter
Bosun
A.B.
A.B.
O.S.
2nd Engr.
1st Engr.
3rd Engr.
Deck Engr.
Oiler
Oiler
Oiler
Oiler
Fireman
Fireman
Ch. Steward
Chief Cook
2nd Cook
Messman
Messman
Messman
Messman
Messman

Trenton,NC
Sherburne, NY
So. Buffelo, NY
Bronx, NY
Mt. Harley, NJ
Newark, Nj


St. Albans, NY
Portland, ME


Denmark
Denmark
Norway
Sweden
Sweden
Sweden
Denmark
Norway
Canada
Scotland
Scotland
Brazil
Canada
Canada
Norway
Canada
Brazil
England
Sweden
Sweden
Portugal
Brazil
Brazil
Brazil
Sweden


SS GRANVILLE
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: Wessel, Duval & Co., 67 Broad St., New York, NY
Master: Friedrich Matzen (Denmark)
Built: West Hartlepool, England 1913
Gross Tons: 4103
Dimensions: 350' x 50' x 25' (Coal burner)
Former Names: (a) TABARKA (b) WIPUNEN

The Panamanian flag freighter, SS GRANVILLE, was torpedoed by the German U-338 (Manfred Knizel) on March 12, 1943 at 1356 GCT while en route from New York to Iceland in Convoy SC 122, with 1300 tons of British Lend-Lease cargo and 2400 tons of U.S. Army and Navy general stores. In addition, there was 500 bags of U.S. Mail and an invasion barge atop #2 and #3 hatches.
The ship's complement consisted of 35 merchant crew, 11 U.S. Naval Armed Guard, and one passenger, a U.S. Army Lt. Colonel. Eleven (11 ) crew members and 2 Navy men lost their lives. Four of the crew lost were Americans.
At 1356 GCT (1156 local time), a torpedo slammed into the port side at #2 hold starting a fire in the hold. As fate would have it, the engine room flooded as the watertight door between the coal bunkers and fire room was not closed because coal was being transferred from the bunkers to the fire room. The ship broke in two pieces amidships and sank within 15 minutes.
Abandon ship was ordered between 1200 and 1206 (ship's time) in boats and rafts. The survivors were picked up about an hour later by HMS LAVENDER (K-60) and landed at Liverpool on March 23rd.
Ten of the crew lost were from the Engine Department, most of them working in the engine room at the time of the explosion. The 2nd Mate was rescued but died on the rescue ship and buried at sea.

U-338 (Kinzel) was sunk by British Sqrn. #120 on September 20, 1943 in position 57-40 N./20-48 W. There were no survivors.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
GRAHAM, Joseph C. (28)
GREGOIRE, Joseph L. (39)
MARTIN, Wilham E. (21)
SELLERS, Joseph (45)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
COLEBANK, Richard T.
KAPEL, Albert G.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
HANSEN, Leo A. (49)
JOXZA, Joseph A. (23)
LEEMANS, Joseph (39)
SMITH, Oscar L. (43)
TAMBURO, Edward (44)
VANES, Leendert (29)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
NOVAK, John F.
DAVIS, John C.
MARTIN, Stephen P.
FIELD, Oliver
MEINHARD, Richard R.
MIJARNES, James P.
MUCHA, Emil R.
NELSON, Robert J.
TOUTANT, Charles, Jr.

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
CHRISTIANSON, Harald
EKHOLM, Nils J.
MAND, Manivald
MIRANDA, Jose M.
MICALLEF, Carmelo
VASTRA, Bernard
ARANSOLA, Jose


Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Coal Passer


S 1c
S 3c


Messman
Oiler
Fireman
Coal Passer
Radio Operator
Chief Cook


Jr.Ensign
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c
GM 3c


Ch. Engr.
Fireman
3rd Negr.
Fireman
2nd Mate
2nd Engr.
Oiler



Marquette, MJ
Worcester, MA
Winchester, MA
Hempstead, NY






New York City
Chicago, IL
Williamstown, NY
New York City
Bloomfield, NJ
Sunnyside, NY













Denmark
Finland
Estonia
Uruguay
Malta
Estonia
Spain

The SS GRANVILLE was taken over by the U.S. Government from the Finnish government at Noon on 12/27/41 in the port of New York and turned over to the War Shipping Administration for operation.



SS H.H. ROGERS
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Panama Transport Co. (Standard Oil of New Jersey)
Master: Clinton W. Hayes
Built: Newport News, Va. 1916
Gross Tons: 8807
Dimensions: 516' x 68' x 38'
Capacity: 119,390 barrels

The Panamanian flag tanker, H.H. ROGERS, was torpedoed by the German U-664 (Adolph Graef) at 1940 local time on February 21, 1943 while en route from Liverpool to a U.S. port in Convoy ONS 167 (#13) in ballast. The attack took place about 600 miles west of the Irish coast in position 50-13 N./24-48 W.
On board was an American merchant crew of 47 and a U.S. Naval Armed Guard crew of 26. All were saved.
The ROGERS had just completed a voyage from New York to Liverpool where she delivered 83,366 barrels of Fuel Oil plus a cargo of war materials. She left Liverpool on February 12th, stopping at Belfast and leaving that port on the 14th.
At 1935 local time, an American freighter, the SS ROSARIO, in position #11, was torpedoed. At 1940, the same U-664 that had sunk the ROSARIO attacked the ROGERS. A torpedo hit on the port side around #10 main tank rupturing the tank and the decks in that vicinity and the fireroom bulkhead. This resulted in the engine and fire rooms flooding. Boat #4 was blown overboard.
After a consultation with the Chief Mate and 1st Engineer, the Master agreed that the ship could not be saved. About a half hour after the attack, the Master ordered the ship abandoned.
Three boats and all the rafts were launched. Boat #3 first followed by #1 and #2. Crew members in #3 boat picked up several of the survivors from the ROSARIO who had been in the water for an hour. Four men on a raft were rescued by one of the British corvettes. All others in the boats and rafts rowed to the rescue ship RATHLIN where they were taken aboard. Those on the RATHLIN were landed at Halifax on March 6th. The four men on the British corvette were landed at St. Johns, Newfoundland on March 1st.

The U-664 (Adolf Graef) was sunk west of the Azores on August 9, 1943 by aircraft from the USS CARD (CVE 11) in position 40-12 N./37-29 W. Eight men were lost and 44 taken prisoner.

Names of the merchant crew and Navy Armed Guard can be found in the book
"SHIPS OF THE ESSO FLEET IN WORLD WAR II."


MS HALMA
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Marine Transport Line/Cosmopolitan Shipping Co.
Master: Hans R. Schnitler (Norwegian)
Built: Aalborg, Denmark 1940
Gross Tons: 2937
Dimensions: 373' x 52' x 18'
Former Name: NORA ex Danish

The MS HALMA, ex Danish "NORA ", was seized under Public Law #I01 by the U.S. on September 8, 1941 and turned over to the War Shipping Administration for operation. On January 6, 1942, the HALMA was registered under the flag of Panama and assigned to the Marine Transport Line under a GAA agreement. On May 14, 1943, the HALMA was turned over to the Cosmopolitan Shipping Company in the port of New York.
The MS HALMA sunk after striking a mine which had been laid by the German U-119 (Horst-Tessen von Kameke) while en route from Boston to Greenland via Halifax, at 1645 GCT on June 3, 1943 in Convoy BX 55 with a load of 2975 tons of general cargo for bases in Greenland.
Due to thick fog, the HALMA got separated from the convoy and was approaching Halifax independently when the ship struck the mine. It exploded on the port side between #2 and #3 hatches. The explosion caused a geyser of water to shoot 75' in the air.
The HALMA took a heavy list to port but gradually settled back on an even keel which she maintained until she went down by the head at 1720 GCT on the same day, 35 minutes after striking the mine.
On board was a merchant crew of 37 and a Naval Armed Guard contingent of 5 men. Also on board were 6 U.S. Army Security personnel bound for Greenland. All hands survived.
All hands abandoned ship in 2 lifeboats. They were rescued by the S/V CAROLINE ROSE at 1900 GCT and landed at Halifax.
U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
CARLI, John J.
FERREIRA, Anthony
GRANT, Ralph H.
JONES, Glenn D.
HEWITT, James J.
KOLARIK, James
KWIATKOWSKI, Edmund
SHEA, James P.
STERLICK, Richard B.
TRANCHINO, Santo V.
WOODS, John J.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
HAMILTON, Harry L.
LYONS, Kenneth D.
KRAMER, William H.
PINKERTON, Delbert
SLEASE, William C.


Messman
Oiler
Messman
Dk. Cadet
Eng. Cadet
Electrician
O.S.
Messman
O.S.
Purser
Messman


Cox.
S lc
S 3c
S lc
S lc

U-119 (v. Kamake) sunk June 24, 1943 by HMS STARLING (U-66) 45-00 N./12-00 W. There were no survivors.



MS HEINRICH v. RIEDEMANN
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Panama Transport Co. (Standard Oil of N.J.)
Master: Andrew Weiler
Built: Vegesack, Germany 1930
Gross Tons: 11,020
Dimensions: 542' x 70' x 39'
Cargo Capacity: 139,515 barrels

The Panamanian flag tanker, MS HEINRICH v. RIEDEMANN,was torpedoed by the German U-66 (Richard Zapp) at 2320 ship time on April 16, 1942 in position 11-55 N./ 63-47 W., while en route alone from Port of Spain, Trinidad to Aruba with a cargo of 127,041 barrels of Crude oil which had been loaded at La Guira, Venezuela. The ship was unarmed.
On board was a crew of 44 men including the Master. All hands were saved.
The ship left La Guira at 1530 on April 14th, proceeding first to Port of Spain for orders. Left that port at 0755 on April 16th in a small convoy. At 1325 the convoy dispersed and the RIEDEMANN proceeded alone according to orders.
At 2320 on the same day (April 16th), a torpedo struck the tanker on the port side in the way of #6 tank. The port diesel was damaged and stopped by the explosion. The steering gear was also wrecked. The Master then ordered the starboard engine stopped as the ship was going around in circles. Oil was pouring out of #6 tank.
The ship was ordered abandoned 20 minutes after the torpedo struck. Three boats were launched, #1-3-4. About 0040 on April 17th, another torpedo hit setting the ship on fire which went out at 0105. At 0155 a 3rd torpedo struck and set the ship afire again. The ship finally disappeared about 0305.
All 44 survivors got away in 3 boats. Fifteen men including the Master were in #1 boat. Ten men were in #3 boat and 14 men were in #4 boat. #1 boat landed at Blanquilla Island at 1900 on the 17th. On April 20th, the SS MARICAIBO picked up the survivors in this boat and landed them at Caracas at 0600 on April 22nd. Those in #3 and #4 boats were picked up by the Norwegian freighter KARMT at 0730 and landed them at Trinidad at 1100 on April 18th.

U-66 (Seehausen) was sunk off Cape Verde Islands in position 17-17 N./32-29 W.) by the USS BUCKLEY (DE 51) and aircraft from the USS BLOCK ISLAND (CVE-21). 24 men from the U-66 were lost and 36 taken prisoner.

The names of survivors can be found in the book
"SHIPS OF THE ESSO FLEET IN WORLD WAR II."



SS HERMIS
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Lykes Bros. SS Co.
Master: Thomas Stanborough
Built: Leghorn, Italy 1919
Gross Tons: 5234
Dimensions: 373' x 46' x 33'
Boilers: Scotch - Coal'
Former Names: (a) ADA ex Italian

The SS HERMIS, a coal burning freighter, registered under the Panamanian flag, was taken over by the U.S. on November I, 1941 in the port of New Orleans under Public Law #101. The War Shipping Administration assigned her to the Lykes Bros. SS Company at the port of New Orleans on May 12, 1942 to be operated under a GAA agreement.
The SS HERMIS, sailing alone and unarmed, was torpedoed by the German U-158 (Erich Rostin) at 2115 ship time on June 6, 1942, while en route from New Orleans to Aruba via Tampa, Panama City, Florida, and La Guaira, Venezuela, in position 23-08 N./84-42 W. with 4995 tons of general cargo.
On board was a complement of 47 merchant crew including 27 American seamen. One crew member, a Coal Passer, was lost and 12 injured.
At 2115 ship's time, a torpedo struck the HERMIS on her port side just forward of the bridge. A few minutes later a second torpedo struck on the port side at #3 hatch. The U-158 also shelled the ship. One shell hit the wheelhouse and chart room demolishing booth. Survivors maintained that two submarines shelled the HERMIS. After the ship was hit, it continued circling at 8 knots because the engines could not be stopped due to the deck valve being broken. Eventually the ship came to a stop. At 1130 EWT on June 7th, the HERMIS was seen to be still afloat with the forward deck level with the water and the stern out of water. The ship was still burning. The ship sank later as it was never seen again.
The crew abandoned ship in boats and rafts. Forty-six (46) survivors were picked up by the USAT TOLOA on June 7 between 0730 and 1130 EWT and taken to Kingston, Jamaica.

The U-158 (Rostin) was sunk west of Bermuda in position 32-50 N./67-28 W. by a U.S. Navy plane VP-74 on June 30, 1942. There were no survivors.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN LOST
GIBSON, Stanley. (19)
U.S. MERCHANT CREW SURVIVORS
STANBOROUGH, Thomas
VARELA, Anthony M. (37)
BURNS, Thomas (46)
HANSEN, Frederick A. (23)
NAHAN, Edward G. (19)
NORTON, Robert E. (38)
SMITH, Nathaniel (22)
FORESTER, Karel (21)
SWISHER, David M. (18)
BRANTLEY, William S. (22)
BLAKELY, Thomas C. (33)
PLENNER, Irving (20)
QUALLS, Jr., Milton J. (21)
JOLY, Lionel J. (28)
KENNEDY, Lawrence L. (21)
DOWNING, Robert A. (22)
McGEE, Robert F. (21 )
MORAN, Richard J. (24)
PATTERSON, Kimble C. (20)
ROHR, Richard W. (20)
THOMPSON, James (21)
KRASNAUSKAS, Peter P. (21)
EDWARDS, Loyal D. (20)
EASTBURN, Greig (41)
MACIOLEK, Franklin B. (19)
LANDRY, Frank C. (25)
WARD, Edmund F. (43)

Coal Passer

Master
Ch. Mate
2nd Mate
3rd Mate
Radio Op.
Purser
A.B.
O.S.
O.S.
Oiler
Oiler
Fireman
Fireman
Messman
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Coal Passer
Coal Passer
Coal Passer
2nd Ck. & Baker
Messman
Messman
Messman

St. Louis, MO


New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
Newport, RI
Houston, TX
Washington, DC
Long Branch, NJ
Jacksonville, FL
Atlanta, GA

Chicago, IL
Livingston, TN
Lowell, MA
St. Louis, MO
Chicago, IL
St. Louis, MO
Jacksonville, FL
Knoxville, TN
Toledo, OH
St. Louis, MO
So. Boston, MA
Hettick, IL
New Orleans, LA
McAlester, OK
New Iberia, LA
Brooklyn, NY


SS I.C. WHITE
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Panama Transport Co. (Standard Oil of N.J.)
Master: William Mello
Built: Chester, PA 1920
Gross Tons: 7013
Dimensions:445' x 59' x 33
Cargo Capacity: 78,220 barrels

The Panamanian flag tanker, SS I.C. WHITE, was torpedoed by the German U-66 (Richard Zapp) at 0015 ship time on September 27, 1941 in position 10-26 S. /27-30 W., while en route, alone, from Curacao to Cape Town, with a cargo of 62,390 barrels of Maroil. The WHITE was steaming fully lighted with the Panamanian flag flying with two spotlights on it, fully lighting the flag. Also the Panamanian flag was painted on both sides of the ship and the Panama Transport markings were on the stack.
On board was an American merchant crew of 37 men.Three of them were lost in the attack which took place over two months before December 7, 1941.
At 0015, a torpedo struck the ship on the starboard side between #7 and #8 tanks. The explosion threw flaming oil up over the boat deck aft. The topmast fell down and the ship sagged in the middle so that water ran across the deck midships. She sank around 0300 the same day.
Three boats, #1-2-3 were launched. The Master, Chief Mate, 2nd Mate, and an Ordinary seaman launched and boarded #1 boat. During the night they met up with #3 boat. The Master ordered an A.B. to take charge of that boat and to stay with #1 boat. At daylight #! boat picked up the 3rd Engineer and a Wiper off a raft. After this, #2 boat was sighted. This boat in charge of the 3rd Mate. Eventually, all the survivors were split up between #2 and #3 boats with the Master in charge of #2 boat and the Chief Mate in charge of #3 boat.
The decision was made to head for the coast of Brazil setting sail at 0930 of September 28th. On October 3rd, Boat #2 was picked up at 2348 local time by the SS DEL NORTE, about 40 miles off Porto de Maceio, Brazil in position 10-16 S./35-23 W. The boat had sailed about 470 miles. Captain Hoehn, of the DEL NORTE, said he had seen the boat's flare 8 miles away.
Boat #3 was picked up on October 3rd by the SS WEST NILUS (Capt. John Stern). This boat had sailed nearly 500 miles. Both ships landed the survivors at Rio de Janeiro on October 7th. The survivors were returned to the U.S. aboard the American SS BRAZIL arriving New York on October 20, 1941.

The U-66 (Seehausen) was sunk off the Cape Verde Islands on May 6, 1944 by the USS BUCKLEY (DE-51) with help from aircraft from the USS BLOCK ISLAND (CVE-21). Of the crew of the U-66, 24 were lost and 36 taken prisoner by the U.S. Navy.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
DOBROSIELSKI, Frank
RANKIN, William C.
YEVIC, Joseph A.

A.B.
Oiler
Bosun
Yevic and Dobrosielski had helped to lower a lifeboat and after it was in the water, slid down the falls but as they did so, the boat was carried away from the ship by a wave. They dropped into the water and were not seen again.

The names of the survivors can be found in the book
"SHIPS OF THE ESSO FLEET IN WORLD WAR II."



MS J.A. MOWINCKEL
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Panama Transport Co. (Standard Oil of N.J.)
Master: Harold Griffiths
Built: Monfalcone, Italy 1930
Gross Tons: 11,147
Dimensions: 540' x 70' x 39
Cargo Capacity: 139,765 barrels

The Panamanian flag tanker, MS J.A. MOWINCKEL, was torpedoed by the German U-576 (Hans-Dieter Heinicke) at 1625 EWTon July 15, 1942 while en route from New York to Aruba in Convoy KS-520 no oil aboard but carrying a small quantity of dry cargo. The tanks were loaded with 6000 tons of fresh water. Soon after the attack, the Master of the ship headed toward shore in order to reach Hatteras Inlet or some other safe place to anchor. In the process of doing this the ship entered a U.S. mine field. About 1955, a mine exploded on the starboard side at #2 tank. There is doubt whether it was a mine or torpedo. The ship did not sink but was later repaired and put back into service.
On board was a merchant crew of 46 men and 13 U.S.Naval Armed Guard. One crew member died of wounds,received in the explosion of the torpedo. One U.S. Navy gunner died of his wounds, received in the explosion of the torpedo, at the Marine Hospital in Norfolk on July 21st. Ten crew members and 4 Navy men were injured by the first explosion but survived.
Four torpedoes had been fired by the U-576. The first hit the SS CHILORE, the 2nd hit the MOWINCKEL, the 3rd sunk the BLUEFIELDS, and the 4th passed astern of the MOWINCKEL.
At about 1625 EWT, the MOWINCKEL was struck in the stern but did not sink. The torpedo hit about 8 feet below the waterline in the after part of the ship, blowing a hole in the hull through the after peak and steering engine room. The steering gear was wrecked along with the galley, messrooms, and after gun platform. The after bulkhead in the engine room was ruptured allowing the engine room to take on water.
After the MOWINCKEL struck the mine the Master dropped the anchor and ordered the ship abandoned in the fear that the ship would be attacked again. The ship was abandoned at 2005 in four boats. Boats #1 S #3 landed at Ocracoke Inlet on July 16th at 0430. The other two were towed by a Coast Guard boat to Ocracoke Inlet.
The MOWINCKEL was towed by the tug J.P. MARTIN to Hatteras Inlet at 0300 on July 20th. The ship was beached and pumped out and floated on July 21st. At 0300 on the 22nd, the ship struck another mine at #7 tank which filled with water. After pumping out that tank the ship was ready for towing on July 23rd. She was taken in tow by the tug RELIEF and U.S. Navy tug USS SCOTIA. Escorted by 2 Corvettes, the tow arrived at Hampton Roads on July 25th, then to Baltimore for temporary repairs. Left Baltimore, in tow, on September 6th arriving New York on September 10th. Repairs were completed on March 12, 1943, sailing the next day for Aruba.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN LOST
COLEMENERO, Clemente

Storekeeper
This man was working in the Messroom when the torpedo hit. He was treated by a doctor from a destroyer but died from the wounds.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
WOLFE, Raymond V.

S 2c
This man was stationed on the after gun platform when the torpedo hit. Died from his wounds at the Marine Hospital in Norfolk on July 21st.

The names of the survivors can be found in the book
"SHIPS OF THE ESSO FLEET IN WORLD WAR II."


MS JOHNSTOWN
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Isthmian SS Co.
Master: Adolph U. Rorup (Denmark)
Built: Odense, Denmark 1931
Gross Tons: 8590
Former Name: NElL MAERSK ex Danish

The Danish flag freighter, MS JOHNSTOWN, was taken over by the U.S. at the port of Baltimore on July 12, 1941 and turned over to the War Shipping Administration for operation. At 1201 EST, the WSA assigned the ship to Isthmian SS Company at Baltimore, on August 15, 1941. The ship was confiscated under an Executive Order. The Name and registry was changed on August 19, 1941.
The MS JOHNSTOWN, a Panamanian flag freighter, was torpedoed by the Japanese submarine 1-20 (T. Yamada) at 0607 ship's time on June 5, 1942 in position 13-12 S./42-06 W., while en route from Karachi to a U.S. port via Lorenco Marques, Mozambique, in ballast. The ship was not zigzag-ging but making a speed of 12 knots and sailing alone. The Naval Armed Guard officer reported the running lights had been on all night. The JOHNSTOWN was armed.
The ship's complement consisted of 43 men, 35 merchant crew and an Armed Guard (U.S. Navy) of six (6). There were 3 American seamen in the crew, none of them lost.
At the time of the attack the ship was southbound in the Mozambique Channel. At 0600, a torpedo was sighted about 1000 feet from the ship which passed about 600 yards from the stern of the ship. At 0607 a torpedo struck amidships on the starboard side. The exposion destroyed the starboard boat and covered the ship with smoke and flames. The engines slowed to 5 knots. The whole main deck was ripped from the explosion. At 0625, another torpedo hit the ship between #4 and #5 hatches on the starboard side. At that time the ship quickly flooded and sank stern first listing heavily to starboard.
The ship was abandoned between the 1st and 2nd torpedo. The survivors boarded two boats, one a metal boat, the other a wooden boat. The number of men in these two boats was 38 total. The survivors were distributed among the two boats, the Master in charge of the metal boat and the Chief Mate the wooden boat. The explosion of the torpedo (first one) blew overboard, 2 Navy gunners and a crew member. They were able to get on a raft, one of three rafts jarred overboard by the explosions. They were rescued by the MS TASMANIA at 1600 local time on June 5th and landed at Aden on June 13, 1942.
The two boats were picked up later on the same day by the New Zealand hospital ship SS MAUNGANUI and landed at Durban on June 9, 1942.
The Navy gunners stationed at the after gun platform were blown in e air by the 1st explosion and landed on the deck, seriously injuring them both. They were later awarded the Purple Heart. The Master and two other crew members were also injured.
U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
ERIKSEN, Ejnar
JACOBSEN, Niels
JENNINGS, Norman V.

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
BENGSTON, Gunnar
RODRIGUEZ, Jose

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
ROBERTSON, Henry A.
LEE, Ralph Odin
OWEN, Cleo Clinton
RAMSEY, James Allen
SETTLE, Grady Hugh
SMITH, Don William

Chief Engr.
A.G.
3rd Mate


Oiler
Messman


Ensign
AS
AS
AS
AS
AS

Brookfield, IL
Salt Lake City, UT
Somerville, MA


Swedish
Brazilian








The merchant crew was repatriated from Capetown aboard the SS MONTEREY. The Naval Armed Guard were repatriated aboard the USS ORIZABA and the SS ATLANTA CITY.


MS LUBRAFOL
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Gulf Oil Co. Belgium
Master: E. Van Schoenberg (Belgium)
Built: Newcastle, England 1924
Gross Tons: 7138

The Panamanian flag tanker, MS LUBRAFOL, was Time-Chartered to the War Shipping Administration at 1500 hours on April 24, 1942 at Aruba N.W.I.
The MS LUBRAFOL, a Panamanian flag tanker, was torpedoed by the German U-564 (Reinhard Suhren) at 0415 EWT on May 9, 1942 in position 26-25 N./80-00 W. (about 3-1/2 miles off Hillsboro Inlet, Florida) while en route alone, from Aruba to New York with a cargo of 67,000 barrels of #2 Heating Oil.
On board was a complement of 44 men consisting of a merchant crew of 38 and a U.S. Naval Armed Guard contingent of 6 men. Thirteen (13/of the crew were lost and 7 were injured. There were no casualties to the Armed Guard. Two of the crew were killed on the bridge. Of the 38 crew members, 11 of them were American citizens. Three of them were among the 13 lost and one was injured.
At 0415 EWT, a torpedo hit on the starboard side amidships at #5 tank which burst into flames immediately. A few seconds later #1 tank burst into flames. The Master is of the opinion that this was caused by a second torpedo. The foremast toppled onto the bridge from the force of the explosion. The engine was stopped at once. The Master ordered the wheel hard over left to bring the ship broadside to the wind with the damaged side to leeward. As all the radio antennae were destroyed, no distress call could be sent.
The ship was abandoned in 3 boats by 42 men. Two had been killed on the bridge. The after boat caught fire. Several crew members jumped overboard from this boat and were lost. This boat was in charge of the Chief Mate.
Two Coast Guard boats were at the scene at once and towed the boats clear of the burning oil to a point of safety. The 31 survivors were landed at Boynton Beach, Florida. Seven bodies were recovered.
The U-564 (H. Fiedler) was sunk by RAF Sqdn. #10 on June 14, 1943 in position 44-17 N./10-25 W. (NW of Cape Ortegal). There were 18 survivors who were rescued by the U-185 on the same day. They were transferred to the German destroyer Z-24. Twenty-eight (28) went down with the U-564.
U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
HARR1NGTON, Joseph R. (28)
LINDSTROM, Elmer (19)
STOYANOVICH, Alex C. (32)

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
CAMACHO, Luciano E. (23)
EGER, Alexander (21)
GILBERT, Steven (25)
JOHNSON, Hubert (19)(lnj.)
KNUDSEN, Lythe (25)
MIKESELL, Willard (26)
SMITH, Albert (24)
WALTER, Joseph (22)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD
AMBROSE, Leonard C.
HOWARD, Lawrence H.
McCLANE, Donald S.
MALCOLM, Hugh B.
MATHEWS, Casey P.
MOSKAL, Edward J.

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
BARNES, J.
COOYERS, William (31)
CRAEN, Gommaire (35)
GULDEN, James (31)
GULLIKSEN, Kristoffer (29)
HOLTHE, O'Leif (24)
LEONHARD, Tom (23)
VANDERBERG, Joseph (45)
VAN DESSEL, Pierre (43)
WEGBRANDS, Abraham (31 )

O.S.
O.S.
Oiler


O.S
O.S
Radio Op.
Galleyman
A.B
Jr. Engr.
Oiler,
Wiper


Coxswain
A.S
A.S
A.S
A.S
A.S


2nd Radio Op.
2nd Cook
Bosun
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
Messman
Messman
1st Engr.
Jr Engr.

Staten Island, NY
Brooklyn, NY
Bronx, NY


New York City
Jamaica, NY
Wheatly, AK
Silver Lake, NJ
Galesburg, IL
Staten Island, NY
New York City
Oceanside, NY










Canada
Dutch
Belgian
Irish
Norwegian
Norwegian
Dutch
Belgian
Belgian
Dutch

Detail info about Tom Leonhard and Abraham Wegbrands can be found at the Netherlands War Graves Foundation


SS MACBETH
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: U.S. Lines
Master: William J. Wright (British)
Built: Genoa 1920
Gross Tons: 4935
Former Name: IDA Z.O. ex Italian

The Panamanian flag freighter, SS MACBETH, was confiscated by the U.S. on July 25, 1941 under an Executive Order. The War Shipping Administration assigned the ship to the U.S. Lines for operation at the port of Mobile on August 19, 1941 under a GAA agreement. The change of name and registry under the flag of Panama took place on August 26, 1941.
The SS MACBETH was attacked by German aircraft at 1407 GCT on September 13, 1942 in position 76-05 N./10- 00 E., while en route from New York to Archangel, North Russia with a cargo of war supplies, foodstuffs, and a deck load of tanks.
The MACBETH was struck by two torpedoes from one of these aircraft. They hit the ship on the starboard side below the waterline rendering the ship helpless. She was later sunk by shell fire from the convoy escorts.
On board was a merchant crew of 38 and a U.S. Naval Armed Guard of one officer and 10 enlisted men. All were saved.
All hands abandoned ship under orders from the Master shortly after the torpedoes struck. They were rescued by British Naval craft and taken to Scapa Flow.
U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN SURVIVOR
DOYLE, Joseph J.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
GIBBS, Charles H.
ANDERSON, Arvid E.
BANCROFT, George A.
BEBOUT, Raymond F.
BLACKMAN, Tillman T.
BOMGAARS, John
CABLE, Harold L.
JOBE, Leo M.
LIGGETT, Jerry D.
WARREN, Franis E.

Wiper


Ensign
AS
AS
AS
S 2c
AS
AS
AS
RM 3c
Coxswain

Los Angeles, CA














MS MAMBI
Home Port: Havana, Cuba
Company: Cuba Distilleries
Master: Ramon Alvarez Iturralde (Survived)
Built: Southampton, England 1883
Gross Tons: 1983
Dimensions: 269' x 40' x 24'
Former Names: (a) NINFA (b) LADAKH

The tanker, MS MAMBI, operating under the control of the War Shipping Administration, was torpedoed and sunk by the German U-176 (Reiner Dierksen), on May 13, 1943 at 0330 local time, in position 21-25 N./76-40 W., while en route from Port Everglades, Florida to Manzanilla, Cuba via Havana in ballast.
On board was a complement of 29 merchant crew made up of Cuban citizens and a US. Naval Armed Guard contingent of five enlisted men. Lost in the attack were 19 of the crew members and 4 Navy men.
No further information on the loss of this ship is available such as how and when were the survivors rescued and by whom. It is known that the survivors were interviewed at Nuevitas, Cuba.
U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
BOLGER, John Kelly
CASE, Kenneth A.
DOROLA, Jr., Roy C.
DUBOISE, Ollie M.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVOR
SHEPARD, Jr., Charles Samuel

S 2c
Coxswain
S lc
S lc


S lc

The U-176 (Dierksen) was sunk north of Havana on May 15, 1943 in position 32-21 N./80-18 W. by Cuban Subchasers and U.S. Navy Squadron VS-62. There were no survivors.

The MAMBI was in convoy with the U.S. tanker MS NICKELINER which was also torpedoed by the U-176.


SS NIMBA
Home Port: Panarna City, R.P.
Company: Alcoa SS Co.
Master: M.L. Newcomb (American) Lost
Built: Sunderland, England 1900
Gross Tons: 1834
Former Name: ASTA (Finland)

The SS NIMBA, a coal burning, Panamanian flag freighter, was confiscated by the U.S. under an Executive Order, from the Finnish government at the port of New York on December 27, 1941 and turned over to the War Shipping Administration. The ship was then assigned to the Alcoa SS Company under a Time Charter on January 7, 1942 at the port of New York. On June 26, 1942 she was assigned to Alcoa on a GAA agreement at the port of St. Thomas, V.I. She was registered under the Panamanian flag at that time.
The SS NIMBA, a Panamanian flag freighter, was torpedoed by the German U-515 (Werner Henke) at 0500 GCT on September 13, 1942 in position 10-40 N./60-15 W., while en route, alone and unarmed, from Paramaribo to Trinidad with a cargo of 2780 tons of Bauxite.
On board was a crew of 30 crew members plus one Work-away seaman. Of this number, 19 were lost including the Workaway seaman. Five Americans, including the Master, were among those who were lost.
At 0500 GCT, a torpedo slammed into the starboard side of the N1MBA at #1 hold. The explosion ripped open the deck blowing Bauxite into the air. The forward rigging crashed to the deck. About 15 seconds later a 2nd torpedo struck on the starboard side in the engine room. This explosion destroyed the starboard boat and ripped up the deck in that area. There was no chance to send a distress call. The ship sank in less than a minute after the first torpedo hit.
There was no time to launch a lifeboat. Seven survivors got on a raft. Three others clung to planking and 2 others were in the water for 12 hours. They were all rescued by the USS BARNEY (DD-149) at 1730 on September 13th. They were landed at Port of Spain the next day.

The U-515 (Henke) was sunk on April 9, 1944 about 175 miles NW of Funchal, Madeira in position 34-35 N./19-18 W. by U.S. Navy DE's. The Captain and 43 of his crew survived and were taken prisoner.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
ARRIAS, Richard (58)
HAAVIG, Hans (48)
LONG, Arthur (48)
NEWCOMB, M.L. (?)
SCULLY, Earl W. (20)

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
HENDERSON, Lin (42)
LANG, Robert (20)
RIVERA, Miguel (18)

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
BENETIS, Nick (29)
CHANG, Lloyd (20)
ELISIAR, John (24)
ESBURG, Alvin (17)
FERRERIA, Manuel (50)
FOKAS, Zaharias (37)
HARRIS, Albert (27)
HOLBAND, Alfred (?)
HUNTER, C.W. (?)
JALBERT, Arthur (24)
KAVAMALIS, Theodore (31)
MORIN, George (46)
TRIDAFOLIS, Mavrojelis (38)
WILLIAMS, Joseph (46)

Fireman
2nd Mate
Steward
Master
A.B.


Chief Engr.
A.B.
Coal Passer


Fireman
Purser
Utility
Coal Passer
Fireman
Messman
O.S.
O.S.
Workaway
3rd Mate
Cook
2nd Engr.
A.B.
1st Engr.

Puritan Mines,W, VA
Brooklyn, NY
Attleboro, MA
Baltimore, MD
Chicago, IL


Brooklyn, NY
Charlestown, MA
Fajardo, P.R.


Greece
British (Trinidad)
Dutch
Dutch
Portugal
Greece
British (Barbados)
Dutch
Scotland
Canada
Greece
Canada
Greece
Canada


SS OLANCHO
Home Port: Puerto Cortez
Company: United Fruit Co.
Master: Sigurd Pedersen
Built: Newburgh, NY
Gross Tons: 2493
Dimensions: 302' x 542' x 15'

The SS OLANCHO, a twin screw freighter, under the Honduran flag, was torpedoed by the U-183 (Heinrich Shafer) at 0158 CWT on March 11, 1943 in position 22-40 N./85-10 W. (about 30 miles west of Cape San Antonio, Cuba) while en route, alone, from Puerto Cortez, Honduras to Tampa, with a full load of bananas and a deck load of Mahogany logs.
On board was a merchant crew of 41 plus 5 U.S. Naval Armed Guards. Twelve of the merchant crew were American seamen. Three crew members were lost, 2 of them were Americans. They jumped over the stern but went under with the suction of the ship. The third one lost was a Honduran who was hit by the turning propeller and died later after being picked up by a liferaft.
The 1st torpedo hit on the starboard side amidships abaft #2 hatch ripping open the hull and demolishing the wheel-house and starboard bridge wing. The explosion stopped the starboard engine and the engine room flooded immediately. The port engine remained running as the Engineer was unable to stop it. He could not find his way around the engine room in the darkness and smoke. Therefore the ship kept going at full speed in circles until the prop was clear of the water due to the ship settling by the bow. At 0215 a 2nd torpedo struck on the port side between #3 and #4 hatch. At 0225 the ship disappeared below the water by the bow with a starboard list.
The OLANCHO was abandoned after the 2nd torpedo hit. Twenty-seven survivors ended up in one boat. Ten more were on a raft (one died) leaving 9 men on that raft. Seven more survivors clung to a hatch cover. Those in the boat and the 9 on the raft were rescued by the SS CHOLUTECA at 0655 on March 11th. Those 7 survivors clinging to the hatch cover were picked up by the USS ABSECON (AVP 23) and taken to Jacksonville. They were rescued on March 13th.
Green phosphorus flares dropped from planes were very helpful in assisting surface craft to locate the survivors.

The U-183 (Fritz Schneewind) was sunk on April 23, 1945 off Surabaja, Java by the USS BESUGO (SS 321). The only survivor was the officer of the deck who was picked up by the BESUGO.
U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
CURRIE, William W. (56)
MEJHEARDT, Bjor I. (48)

U.S. MERCHANT CREW SURVIVORS
BURNS, Thomas (41)
FALK, Bernard P. (22)
HENDERSON, John (22)
KILL, Jans (46) .
KELLY, Charles F. (19)
LORENTZEN, Max B. (33) .
LOWE, Ansel (20)
NELSON, Robert C. (22)
PEDERSEN, Sigurd (48)
ZETLER, Philip A. (21 )

FOREIGN SEAMAN LOST
SERRANO, Ruben

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
DAVIS, Charles
ENGLISH, Leonard
HUBLER, Delbert
SCEWSRY, Francis F.
WILBURN, Jesse

Chief Engr.
1st Engr.


2nd Engr.
3rd Engr.
Jr Engr.
Chief Mate
Cadet
Ch. Steward
Cadet
Purser
Master
Radio Op.


Student Cook








New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA


Fall River, MA
New Orleans, LA
Tampa, FL
New Orleans, LA
Denison, TX
New Orleans, LA
Warrenville, SC
Yonkers, NY
New Orleans, LA
Duke City, PA


Honduras







There is no further data on the above Navy men in the ship's file.


SS ONTARIO
Home Port: Puerto Cortes, Honduras
Company: United Fruit Co.
Master: Anders Weesgaard (Lost on the SS SAN BLAS)
Built: Camden, NJ 1904
Gross Tons: 3099
Dimensions: 292' x 42' x 16'

The SS ONTARIO, a Honduran flag, coal burning freighter, was shelled and sunk by the German U-507 (Harro Schacht) at 1935 CWT on May 6, 1942 in position 28-22 N./87-33 W. while en route, alone and unarmed, from Puerto Cortes to Mobile with a full cargo of bananas.
The crew was made up of 32 Americans, 11 Hondurans, one Dane, and one British, a total of 45 men. All hands survived.
At 1200 CWT on May 6, 1942, the ONTARIO received a distress message from the ALCOA PURITAN saying she was being attacked. At that time, the ONTARIO was ordered to proceed to the nearest port. The Master ordered zigzagging patterns to commence. Her speed was 12 knots and steered a general course of NNW.
At 1925 CWT, the U-507 was sighted off the port quarter.A distress call was sent at that time. At 1935 CWT, the U-507 commenced shelling the ONTARIO destroying the bridge, wheelhouse, and the mainmast. The engines were stopped at this time but resumed at 1955 blowing a hole in the port quarter. The last time the ship was seen was at 2040 CWT. At this time, the ship was burning.
A salvage crew returned later to investigate the possibility of saving the ship but she had gone down.
All hands abandoned ship safely in 3 lifeboats. They were picked up at 0130 CWT on May 7th by the USS ONYX and put ashore at Burwood, Louisiana.

The U-507 (Schacht) was sunk NW of Natal, Brazil on January 15, 1943 in position 1-38 S./39-52 W. by U.S. Navy aircraft VP-83. There were no survivors.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
SOUTAR, James (44)
COULOMBE, George (27)
SCANNELL, John F. (21)
ANDREWS, Wayne (22)
HUEBNER, Otha A. (46)
PORTER, David C. (45)
CASAL, Ramon (51)
WILLIAMS, Richard (27)
SHARP, James (56)
THOMPSON, James (44)
WILLIAMS, Victor (48)
EDWARDS, Alec E. (32)
HOWARD, Walter (24)
MITCHELL, Lawrence (47)
BOGENS, Wilbert (29)
STERLING, Alphonse (45)
PAGE, Henry (59)
MORGAN, Edward (29)
ALEXANDER, Henry (32)
HENRY, Oscar (43)
NARCISSE, Herbert (33)
CARDRICHE, James (19)
CLARK, Teddy (21)
EDWARDS, Earl (30)
WILLIAMS, Lawrence (46)
HOTARD, John M.
BROWN, Leonard E. (45)
DANIELS, Preston A. (24)
MACKEY, James (37)
JENKINS, Tom (32)
MOSELY, lsadore (30)
GREENWOOD, Joseph (20)

Chief Mate
2nd Mate
3rd Mate
Radio Op.
Chief Engr.
1st Engr.
3rd Engr.
Oiler
Oiler
Oiler
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Coal Trimmer
Coal Trimmer
Coal Trimmer
Coal Trimmer
Coal Trimmer
Coal Trimmer
Coal Trimmer
Coal Trimmer
Coal Trimmer
Coal Trimmer
Coal Trimmer
Coal Trimmer
Ch.Stew/Purser
Ch. Cook
2nd Cook
Utility
Messman
Messman
Messman

Astoria, NY
Somerville, MA
Great Neck, NY
Houston, TX
New Orleans, LA
Yonkers, NY
New York City
Natchez, MS
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
Hoboken, NJ
New York City
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA
New Orleans, LA


MS PANAM
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Marine Transport Line
Master: Jorgen Knudsen
Built: Hesse, England 1925
Gross Tons: 7277
The tanker, MS PANAM, was taken over by the U.S. Government from the government of Panama. The ship was turned over to the War Shipping Administration at 0900 on July 14, 1942 in the port of New York. At the same day and time she was assigned to the Marine Transport Lines for operation under a GAA agreement.
The Panamanian flag tanker, MS PANAM, was torpedoed by the German U-129 (Hans Witt) at 1825 EWT on May 4, 1943, off the coast of North Carolina in position 34-10 N./76-05 W., while en route from Norfolk to Lake Charles, Louisiana in ballast. The ship was in Convoy NK-538. The tanker's complement was 37 merchant crew and 14 U.S. Naval Armed Guard. Two (2) crew members were killed when the torpedo struck in the engine room. One of them was an American citizen.
At 0825, a torpedo struck on the port side in the engine room, completely wrecking it and completely demolishing the engines. Flooding in that area became almost simultaneous. About 8 to 10 minutes later another torpedo struck on the port side amidships, wrecking the pumproom. The PANAM sunk at 0855 EWT on May 4, 1943.
On May 4th at 0100 the PANAM developed engine trouble causing her to become a straggler from the convoy thereby allowing the U-129 the chance to attack.
The Master ordered abandon ship following the explosion of the 2nd torpedo. Three boats were launched. Some crew members jumped overboard and were picked up by the boats. The 49 survivors were rescued by the USS SC 664 at 1400 EWT on May 4th and landed 4 hours later at Morehead City, NC.

The U-129 was out of service in July 1944 and scuttled 8/19/44 at Lorient, France.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN LOST
MAG1LL, William H. (22)

FOREIGN SEAMAN LOST
BLOMGREN, Knut

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN SURVIVOR
KELLAR, Louis (22)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
ZINN, Arley P.
BROWN, fnu
CHERNEWAK, Michael
FAGRE, Leonard M.
GIBSON, fnu
DEPCZENSKI, Ferdinand
McKENNA, Joseph J.
MAYLE, Earl E.
MOBLEY, Robert D.
MYERS, Charles F.
LONG, Patrick J.
TRICARICO, Frank L.
VELAZQUEZ, John L.
PERANTONI, Fred B.

Wiper


3rd Engr.


A.B.


Lt. jg
RM 3c
S lc
S 3c
S lc
GM 3c
S 1 c
S lc
GM 3c
S 1 c
S 1c
S 1c
S lc
S lc

E. Fairfield, OH


Norway


Nicholson, MS
















Unfortunately, there is no crew list for the merchant seamen in this ship's files at the Coast Guard in Washington, DC. Therefore we don't know if there were any other American seamen in this crew. All there is in this file pertaining to the merchant crew is a list of names of those rescued but it does not tell their first name, position, or nationality. Good crew lists are very hard to find in the files of these Panamanian flag ships. Careful records of these ships were very scarce, not being under the U.S. flag.


SS PILLORY
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Danish Ship Operating Co.
Master: Laurid N. Sorensen (49) Danish citizen (Lost)
Built: Nakskou, Denmark 1933
Gross Tons: 1517
The SS PILLORY, ex Danish JONNA, was confiscated by the U.S. Government under Executive Privilege. She was turned over to the War Shipping Administration at the port of New York on June 11, 1941. On August 5, 1941 she was Bareboat Chartered to the U.S. War Department. On March 17, 1942, the ship was assigned to the Marine Operating Company at the port of New York under a GAA agreement. At this time she was renamed PILLORY and registered under the flag of Panama. On August 19, 1942, the Stockard SS Company took her over for operation. On Feburary 8, 1944 the Danish Ship Operating Company took over the operation at the port of Norfolk under a GAA agreement.
The SS PILLORY, a coal burning Panamanian flag freighter, was torpedoed by the German U-539 (Lauterbach-Emden) at 1430 EWT on June 5, 1944 while en route from San Juan P.R. to Guayanilla, P.R. in ballast to load sugar. She was escorted by the USCG #83310, an 83' cutter, the ship was sunk in position 18-26 N./67-17 W.
On board was a merchant crew of 37 and a U.S. Naval Armed Guard contingent of 9 enlisted men and one Officer. Twenty-one (21) crew members were lost along with four (4) of the Armed Guard. The Master was among those lost.
The PILLORY had departed San Juan about 0700 on June 5, 1942. At 1300 she made a rendezvous with the CG #83310 Which was to be her escort. The escort took station about 500 yards off the starboard beam where it had difficulty keeping up with the PILLORY. At 1430 EWT, a torpedo struck directly below the starboard wing of the bridge blowing all those in that area overboard. After the explosion the ship list to starboard. The entire superstructure and bridge were blown away.
Three of the ship's officers and the Navy signalman were blown overboard. A hole was blown in #2 hold flooding the hold rapidly. The engines continued running and the propeller continued turning as the stern lifted in the air.
Two minutes after the 1st torpedo hit, a 2nd struck amidships on the starboard side breaking the ship in two and blowing engine room machinery out through the skylight. The PILLORY went down by the bow immediately after the 2nd torpedo hit.
There was no time to launch lifeboats but some rafts were cut loose. Those who survived the two explosions all jumped overboard and proceeded to swim to the rafts. Many who had jumped over the side after the 1st explosion were killed by falling debris caused by the 2nd explosion.
Following the sinking of the PILLORY, the sea was dotted with wreckage. The #83310 began to pick up survivors rescuing a total of 21 men. The USCG CRAWFORD (WSC 134) picked up two more. All were taken to Mayaguez, arriving there at 1730 on June 5th.

The U-539 (Lauterbach-Emden) surrendered at Bergen, Norway in May 1945.

The PILLORY was the only ship the U-539 sank. However, it did damage the SS KITTANNING on July 5, 1944. The T-2 tanker was repaired and put back into service.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
FORD, Alphonso (34)
STEPHENSON, Frank C. (52)
ACEVEDOK, Pedro (29)
ROBLES, Damasco (40)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
DANIELS, Bruce B.
DEISCHER, Paul C.
TRECHE, Richard H.
WATSON, James T, ***

Messman
Fireman
Coal Passer
Coal Passer


S lc
S lc
SM 3c
GM 3c

Savannah, GA
Conneault, OH
Mayaguez, P.R.
Fajardo, P.R.







*** This man was crossing the catwalk to his forward gun station when the 2nd torpedo hit causing him severe internal injuries. He died in a hospital shortly after being brought ashore.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
CONNELL, John J. (33)
GOSSERT, Robert F. (29)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
MILLMAN, Matthew ***
CAMPBELL, Jamea, R.
DOMBECKI, Edward F.
McGINN, Patrick J.
OLINGER, Robert S.
ZINK, John S.


Radio Op.
Purser


Lt. Jg
S 1c
S 1c
S 1c
S 1c
S 1c



Stoughton, MA
Shippenburg, PA









*** This man, the Armed Guard officer, was blown overboard from the bridge wing causing seven of his vertebrae to be fractured. He was hospitalized in Mayaguez until October 12, 1944 before being evacuated to the Jacksonville Naval Hospital.


SS PLAUDIT
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: South Atlantic SS Co.
Master: Axel Pedersen (42) Danish citizen
Built: Sunderland, England 1913
Former Name: GUIDONIA ex Italian
Under an Executive Order, the SS PLAUDIT, ex Italian GUIDONIA, was taken over by the U.S. at Norfolk on August 23, 1941. The War Shipping Administration assigned the ship to the South Atlantic SS Company under a GAA agreement on September 25, 1941 at the port of Norfolk. On October 8, 1941 the ship was registered under the flag of Panama and the name changed to PLAUDIT.
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS PLAUDIT, was torpedoed and shelled by the German U-181 (Wolfgang Luth) at 2000 GCT on November 8, 1942 in position 36-00 S./26-32 W., while en route from Colombo, Ceylon to a U.S. port via Capetown loaded with 1075 tons of rubber, 1000 tons of Manganese Ore, 1000 tons of jute and gunnysack, 400 tons of tea, and 500 live monkeys as deck cargo.
At 2000 GCT, a torpedo struck on the port side in the engine room flooding that space at once. Both port boats were demolished as was the chart room, radio shack, and port bridge wing. No distress call could be sent. About 30 minutes after the torpedo struck, the U-181 commenced shelling the PLAUDIT, firing 15-20 rounds into the ship.
The ship was abandoned in the two starboard boats and 2 rafts without the abandon ship signal being sounded but the ship's officers soon gained control. The U.S. Navy Armed Guard members stationed at the after gun remained there until ordered to jump.
The ship's complement consisted of 38 merchant crew and 11 U.S. Navy Armed Guard. Seven of the merchant crew were Americans but all survived. Two crew members, the 3rd Engineer and the Chief Cook were lost. One Navy gunner was also lost.
The survivors were picked up about 40 hours later. Those in #3 boat were picked up at 0500 GCT on November 10 by the South African minesweeper T-01, approximately 5 miles from the coast near Port Elizabeth. The T-01 remained in the area after receiving a message that another boat had been spotted by a Royal Air Force plane. Those in this boat (#1) were picked up by the T-01 at 1400 GCT on the same day, November 10th. This boat was located about 75 miles from the coast. Survivors of both boats were transferred to the RAF crash boat NAVIGATOR at 1415 GCT and taken to Port Elizabeth arriving there at 1730 on the same day. Some members of the crew and Naval Armed Guard were repatriated to the U.S. aboard the SS ROBIN DONCASTER arriving at Philadelphia on December 13, 1942.

The U-181 (Freiwald) was taken over by the Japanese in May 1945 and renamed 1-501. This sub surrendered in Singapore and was scrapped.

***Unfortunately, the crew list in this ship's file does not list the positions on the ship for the merchant crew.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
JOHNSON, Ralph P.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
ALLEN, James A. (30)
BURBAGE, Frank (22)
HAWLEY, L.R. (36)
STEPHENS, James (38)
BONAVENTURE, Francis (20)
LIPSIK, Samuel J. (33)
STRALEY, Edward D. (?)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
BURR, William A.
KARR, John C.
KAREIVA, Walter B.
KINNISON, Willis L.
KNOWLDEN, Jack D.
KOTOWSKI, Joseph W.
KOZMA, Albert M.
LAMB, Delbert L.
LARSON, Leroy M.
FRANEY, lrad L.

AS


***








Ensign
AS
AS
AS
AS
AS
AS
AS
AS
AS




Williamson, W.VA
Summerville, SC
Brooklyn, NY
Vienna, GA
Pawtucket, RI
Salem, MA
Spotswood, NJ














SS POMPOON
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: United Fruit Co.
Master: Edward Condell (49) British citizen (Lost)
Built: Data not available.
Gross Tons: 1802
Former Name: ATLAS 11 ex Finnish
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS POMPOON, was taken over from the Finnish government under an Exeuctive Order at the port of Philadelphia on December 27, 1941 and turned over to the War Shipping Administration. The WSA then assigned the ship to Alcoa SS Company under a Bareboat Charter on February 9, 1942 at the port of Philadelphia. On August 7, 1942 Alcoa operated the ship under a GAA agreement. On October 5, 1942 Bulk Carriers took her over in the port of New York under a GAA agreement. On December 14, 1942 the United Fruit Company took over the operation of the POMPOON under a GAA agreement and operated her until her loss.
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS POMPOON, was torpedoed by the German U-516 (Hans-Ritger Tillessen) at 2400 GCT on November 12, 1943 in position 11-00 N,/75-00 W.(about 75 miles north of Cartegnea) while en route, unescorted, from Cristobal to Barranquilla with a load of general cargo and a deck load of 10'' steel pipes and steel reinforcing rods.
The ship's complement consisted of 23 crew members and 4 U.S. Navy Armed Guard. There were only 4 survivors, a Messman and 3 Navy men. There were no Americans in the merchant crew.
At 2400 hours on November 12, a torpedo struck the ship amidships on the port side breaking the POMPOON in two. Both ends sank with the midship part sinking first on both ends.
There was no time to launch a boat. Five men struggled to the surface and climbed aboard rafts that had floated free. Eventually they all got on one raft. Four men survived on this raft from November 12 to December 3rd. The fifth man, a Cuban Radio Operator, died on November 13 and was buried at sea. The four survivors were picked up on December 3rd by a Panamanian flag vessel at 1330 GCT in position 9-45 N./76-45 W. They were taken to Cristobal where they were hospitalized in serious condition.
On the raft were some stores plus other food they had taken from another raft. The stores consisted of 6 gallons of water, 7 bottles of malted milk tablets, 3 pounds of chocolate, and 10 pounds of hardtack. During their ordeal they were able to catch many fish.
Survivors said from the 3rd day on, they observed a steady sighting of many U.S. Navy and Army aircraft plus many tankers and freighters but none of them ever stopped to pick them up. One ship was so close that even the name could be read.

The U-516 (Petran) surrendered in May 1945.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
PROVENCAL, L.F.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
MAUK, John D.
REYNOLDS, Richard F.
WARDEN, Sylvester C.

FOREIGN SEAMAN SURVIVOR
AGUAS, Epaminondas** (24)

S lc


S lc
GM 3c
S lc


Messman




Chariton, IA
Battle Creek, MI
Kansas City, KS


Colombian


**This man hospitalized in Margarita Hospital, Canal Zone.
***The three Naval Gun Crew were taken to Coc Solo Hospital.
FOREIGN CREW LOST
CONDELL, Edward (49)
BERTRAND, Jose B. (28)
BODDEN, James (25)
PAGE, William (46)
WOOD, Cecil (20)
HURLSTON, George (45)
EBANKS, Martin (18)
BERRY, Arnold (33)
FREDERICK, Clarence (18)
PEREIRA, Manuel (35)
RODRIGUEZ, Manuel (42)
GUSTAVSEN, Hendrick (40)
VASQUEZ, Angel
RENGIFO, Segundo (32)
NAZARENO, Angel (42)
ME JlA, Adolfo (23)
RUF, Fritz
RIDDOCK, Stanley (24)
WATLER, Harris G.
ALEXANDER, Jorge (26)
BODDEN, Halkeith (21 )
CABEZAS, Moises (28)
GARCIA, Arturo J.

Master
Ch. Mate
2nd Mate
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
O.S.
O.S.
O.S.
Ch. Engr.
1st Engr.
2nd Engr.
Donkeyman
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Ch. Steward
Cook
Messman
Messman
Messman
Coal Passer
Radio Op./Purser

British
Mexican
British
Honduran
British
British
British
British
British
Spanish
Spanish
Norwegian
Colombian
Colombian
Colombian
Honduran
Swiss
Honduran
British
Costa Rican
British
Colombian
Cuban


SS RACELAND
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: South Atlantic SS Co.
Master: S. Brekke (53) Norwegian (Lost)
Built: Genoa 1921
Gross Tons: 4815
Former Names: IRCANIA (Italian)
The coal-burning, Panamanian flag freighter, SS RACELAND, ex Italian SS IRCANIA, was taken over by the U.S. under an Executive Order at the port of Jacksonville on June 24, 1941. The War Shipping Administration assigned the ship to the South Atlantic Line on December 31, 1941 at Jacksonville.
The SS RACELAND, a coal-burning freighter, was sunk by German aircraft at 1115 GCT on March 28, 1942, while en route from Boston to Murmansk in Convoy PQ-13 when about 110 miles NE of North Cape, Norway. She left Boston in February (exact day unknown) making stops at Halifax, Grenock, Scotland, and Reykjavik. Left there on March 24th. Her cargo consisted of 9000 tons of Russian Lend-Lease material consisting of tanks, trucks, and planes. At the time of the attack, the RACELAND was sailing alone having been separated from the convoy due to heavy gales on March 26th.
There was a merchant crew of 47 men aboard. The U.S.Maritime Commission War Risk Insurance files show that 35 men were lost and 12 taken prisoner. One American was lost and another taken prisoner.
The ship was armed with .30 caliber machine guns manned by the crew.
The RACELAND was attacked by two planes. Two bombs hit about 20 yards from the ship on the starboard side near #3 hatch. There were no direct hits. The concussion of the bombs caused a hole in the starboard side of the hull forward, broke deck fittings, steam pipes, and stopping the engines. The engine room flooded and the ship took a 45 list to port. The ship finally sank at 2000 GCT.
The entire crew abandoned ship in two boats at 1135 GCT. During the night they kept together. The next day, March 29, they became separated at 1200 GCT. On March 30th, in the afternoon, the wind increased to gale force. On April 2nd at 1600 one boat landed on Norwegian soil. They were rescued by Norwegian civilians after they had spent 24 hours on the beach. They were taken to a German Naval hospital at Tromso where they remained until April 20th. From there they were sent to the Merchant Marine POW camp at Bremen via Wilhelmshaven.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN LOST
BERGHAAS, Arne (40)

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN TAKEN PRISONER
MIERZECKI, Jose


3rd Mate


Fireman





185 11th Ave.,
New York, NY

This seaman was in the boat that landed in Norway. He had both legs amputated in the German hospital at Tromso after being in the boat for 6 days in freezing temperatures and snow. Fifteen other seamen died in this boat from exposure. The other boat was never heard from again. The crew list in this ship's file was not the one for this voyage. Therefore, it was impossible to determine who was on the ship. The 3rd Mate, Arne Berghaas had made the previous trip and had signed on for another trip.



SS PINK STAR
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: U.S. Lines
Master: John S. MacKenzie (55) Canadian
Built: No data
Gross Tons: 4150
Former Name: LUNDBY (ex Danish)
The SS PINK STAR, ex Danish flag freighter, LUNDBY, was taken over by the U.S. and turned over to the War Shipping Administration for operation. The WSA assigned the ship to the U.S. Lines under a GAA agreement at the port of New York on August 11, 1941. The ship was taken over under an Executive Order at the port of New York on July 12, 1941. Renamed PINK STAR and registered in Panama on 8/13/41.
The SS PINK STAR, a Panamanian flag freighter, was torpedoed by the German U-552 at 2351 GCT on September 19, 1941 while en route from New York to a United Kingdom port with a full cargo, in Convoy SC 44. The Commanding Officer of the U-552 was Erich Topp.
The crew was made up of 35 merchant seamen. Thirteen (13) were lost, one of them was an American. Another American survived.
There isn't any more data to be had in this ship's file. Nothing to describe the attack or abandonment of the ship or of how they were rescued.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN LOST
SEYMOUR, Edward (41)


U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN SURVIVOR
PARKINSON, Charles (41)


FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
COTTON, Thomas C.M. (51)
CASS1DY, James H. (22)
MILDREN, Alfred L. (56)
ARCHER, John J. (43)
SORENSEN, Ejnar (53)
PRICE, Kenneth J. (23)
DeGUILLOU, Pierre (20)
MURPHY, John L. (?)
HAMERSLAG, Isaac (21)
Van Der ZYDEN, Arnoldus
HO, Loyd (49)

Ch. Steward



Jr. Engr.



Ch. Mate
2nd Mate
3rd mate
2nd Engr
Electrician
A.B
A.B.
Radio Op.
Oiler,
Messman
Ch. Cook

245 91st ST,
Brooklyn, NY


22 20th Ave,
Irvington, NJ


Canadian
Canadian
British
Canadian
Danish
Canadian
French
Canadian
Dutch
Dutch
Chinese

Detail info about Arnoldus van der Zijden and Izaak Hamerslag can be found at the Netherlands War Graves Foundation


SS RAMAPO
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Waterman SS Co.
Master: Johan Ozn Lorentzen (Lost)
Built: Genoa 1924
Gross Tons: 3027
Former Name: SANTA ROSA (ex Italian)
The Italian freighter, SS SANTA ROSA, was taken over by the U.S. on July 25, 1941 at the port of Philadelphia under an Executive Order. The ship was turned over to the War Shipping Administration for operation at that time. On September 19, 1941 the registry of the ship was changed to Panamanian and the name changed to RAMAPO. The WSA assigned the ship to the Waterman SS Company on October 28, 1941 under a GAA agreement.
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS RAMAPO, was torpedoed by the German U-108 (Klaus Scholtz) at 1356 GCT on February 16, 1942 in position 35-06 N./65-56 W. (West of Bermuda), while en route alone and unescorted, from Bermuda to Philadelphia.
The RAMAPO signed articles on November 6, 1941 at Philadelphia for a voyage to Liverpool as the crew list is dated December 31, 1941 at Liverpool.
On board was a merchant crew of 38 men. There were no survivors. The crew was made up of 11 different nationalities.
One American was in the crew. The ship had one gun aft but no gun crew was aboard.
The following contains excerpts from the log of the U-108: Feb. 16, 1942 (Times are stated as local times)
0656 ....Steamer sighted 75 True on a course of 330 T. Comes in sight at dawn. Run ahead to get in position.
0900 .....Submerged for attack.
0956 .....Fired one torpedo from Tube Il. Ship distant 900 meters. Hit midships after 60 second run. Boiler exploded. Ship folds in middle and slowly breaks in two.
1007 .....Surfaced. Steamer sinks during surfacing. The C.O. describes the ship as follows: Freighter, loaded, about 5000 gross tons. Straight bow, old-fashioned stern. First mast located between #1 and #2 hatches. No hold between bridge and smokestack. Second mast between Hatch #4 and #5. One screw. Ship painted grey. 34 survivors.
As you can see by the last log entry all but four of the crew survived the explosion. These 34 men simply disappeared, no doubt perishing from exposure.

The U-108 (M. Brunig) was laid up in Stettin on 4/17/44. Scuttled on 4/24/45.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
McADOO, John Cornelius (37)
Signed on under the name Harvie E. BOYD

BOYD, Fred (35)
Crew list shows him Canadian but he lived with his wife Susan in Baltimore.

LORENTZEN, Johan O. (35)
Crew list shows him Norwegian but he lived with his wife in Glendale, NY.

McDONALD, Charlie (25) Crew list shows him Canadian but he lived with his wife in Boston.

NICHOLSON, William (36)
Crew list shows him British but he lived with his wife in Philadelphia.

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
HELMERS, Thorleif (42)
DELANO, Miguel (31 )
WESTERHUS, Nils (38)
LORD, lan M. (18)
JENNERUD, Jul K. (24)
LIE, Haris (20)
CHRISTIENSEN, Toralf (21)
HAGGBERG, Eric (22)
LALONDE, Germain (22)
KNICKE, Fred (39)
WILSON, Edgar (27)
SINCLAIR, Leslie (20)
MANOFF, Paul (22)
OLSEN, Andreas (50)
GREEN, William (29)
ARTAVANIS, Marios (29)
WADDELL, Wesley (23)
HANSEN, Bernard (23)
BRACKENBURY, Walter (22)
REYNOLDS, William (28)
BOYER, Clarence (41)
HUGHES, James (30)
BIRCH, John (50)
COURV1LLE, Roland (18)
GUSTAVSEN, Karl (50)
GLIMMERVEEN, Albert (37)
VITALIS, VasilioS (29)
LAWRENCE, Felix (30)
FINCH, Thomas (20)
HERNANDES, P. (26)
BAILEY, Mills (44)
HENDRY, Fred W. (51)
LEARY, Vincent (35)

Messman


Messman



Master



Fireman


Bosun




Chief Mate
2nd Mate
3rd Mate
Radio Op.
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
O.S.
O.S.
O.S.
Chief Engr.
Oiler
Oiler
Oiler
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Trimmer
Trimmer
Trimmer
Ch. Steward
Ch. Cook
2nd Cook
Messman
Messman
Fireman
3rd Engr.
1st Engr.
2nd Engr.

Baltimore, MD


















Norwegian
Chilean
Norwegian
Canadian
Norwegian
Norwegian
Norwegian
Swedish
Canadian
British
Canadian
British
Canadian
Norwegian
Canadian
Greek
Canadian
Norwegian
Canadian
Irish
Canadian
Canadian
British
Canadian
Norwegian
Dutch
Greek
French
British
Argentine
British
British
British

Detail info about Albert Glimmerveen can be found at the Netherlands War Graves Foundation


S/V REINE MARIE STEWART
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Shepard SS Co. Boston, MA
Master: Paul F. Radeboldt
Built: Thomaston, Maine 1919
Gross Tons: 1087
Dimensions: 218'x 41'x 19'
Type of Rig: 4 Masted Schooner
The Panamanian flag sailing vessel (4 Masted Schooner), REINE MARIE STEWART, was shelled and torpedoed by the Italian submarine DA VINCI (Luigi Longanesi-Cattani) at 2250 GCT on June 2, 1942, while en route from New York to an East African port with a cargo of lumber cut for fruit boxes with a deck cargo of same, piled 6'- 8' high covered with canvas. She was sailing alone and unarmed.
On board was a crew of eleven men including the Master.All were saved.
When about 40 miles SW of Freetown, Sierra Leone in position 7-16 N./13-20 W. the REINE MARIE STEWART was attacked by the Italian sub DA VINCI with shelling at first then by a torpedo sinking the ship. At the time the vessel was becalmed and showing no lights. No electricity on board, only kerosene lanterns,
The crew of ] 1 abandoned ship in the one lifeboat, a 16' long, clinker built, wooden boat with an inboard motor. They headed for the West African coast and were eventually rest cued by the British SS AFGHANISTAN and landed at Capetown around the 24th of June. The crew was repatriated to the U.S. on the SS MONTEREY. The date of rescue is unknown.

CREW MEMBER SURVIVORS
RADEBOLDT, Paul F. (58)
MASON, Charles A. (60)
STOLZ, Allan (26)
GREEN, Wilbert (40)
SAUL, Lambert (27)
PARKINEN, Veikko (22)
LILLEHEIL, Add (20)
FISHER, Aye (18)
HENNIGEN, Leif (19)
PERIER, Alfred (17)
GENTRY, Willie F. (45)

Master
Ch. Mate
Donkeyman
Bosun
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
Cook

Ozone Park, NY
Narragansett, RI
Sweden
Brunswick, GA
Estonia
Finland
Norway
Denmark
Denmark
American (no address)
Swainsboro, GA

The LEONARDO DaVINCI was sunk on May 23, 1943 off the Azores in position 42-16 N./ 15-40 W. by HMSNESS (K-219) and HMS ACTIVE (11-14). The sub wascommanded by Gianfranco Gazzana. Number of lostand survivors account is not available.

Much of the data on this ship courtesy of Capt. Harold D. Huycke.


SS SAN BLAS
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: United Fruit Co.
Master: Anders Weesgaard (Lost)
Built: Belfast, No. Ireland 1920
Gross Tons: 3601
Dimensions: 325' x 46' x 30'
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS SAN BLAS, was Time-Chartered to the War Shipping Administration from the United Fruit Company at Galveston on May 22, 1942 at 1800.
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS SAN BLAS, a freight and reefer ship, was torpedoed by the German U-158 (Erich Rostin) at 2150 CWT on June 16, 1942, in position 25-26 N./95-33 W., while en route from Galveston to Puerto Barrios, Guatemala in ballast. She was sailing alone and blacked out.
On board the SAN BLAS was a complement of 39 merchant crew and a U.S. Naval Armed Guard of five. Of this number, 27 crew members including the Master and 3 Navy gunners were lost. There were 8 Americans in the merchant crew. Three were lost.
Two torpedoes were fired by the U-158. The first barely missed the stern area but the 2nd torpedo hit at the port quarter blowing the stern to pieces, blowing open #4 hatch, carried away the mainmast, and stopped the engines. The SAN BLAS went down within 3-4 minutes, sinking by the stern with a heavy starboard list.
There was no chance to launch any boats but 4 rafts were cut away. Fourteen (14) survivors (12 crew & 2 Navy gunners) were picked up on June 29 at 1250 CWT in position 28-01 N./96-02 W. by the U.S. Navy PBY #26. They were landed at Corpus Christi a few hours later. They had survived 13 days on the rafts.

The U-158 (Rostin) was sunk west of Bermuda (32-50 N./ 67-28 W.) on June 30, 1942 by U.S. Navy aricraft VP-74. There were no survivors.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
EVANS, John (25)
GOULD, Sherman (30)
NAISMITH, Robert (56)

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
HUGHES, Thomas (18)
JACOBSEN, Milton (19)
SCAVO, Frank (28)
TREWIN, James (20)
WIMPRINS, Severin (48)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
CHRISTENSEN, Axel S.
KAY, Erin E.
KAUFFMANN, Frank L.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
KISER, Eugene P.
KOLB, Mark J.

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
WEESGAARD, Anders (52)
GARCIA, Jose (41)
RISOEN, Olaf (40)
ELVAAS, Reidar (31)
MCNAB, Elsworth (19)
ROMERO, Pablo (20)
HERNANDEZ, Carlos (24)
PAZ, Rodolfo (21)
MURILLO, Francisco (24)
DOUGLAS, Robert (50)
NIELSEN, Kaj (24)
RODRIGUEZ, Dionisio (46)
VINDEL, Francisco (21 )
MOLINA, Jose (20)
BODDEN, Albert (24)
GOMEZ, Estanislao (38)
VARELA, Jose (24)
POPLEY, Charles (49)
FRANCISCO, Woodrow (23)
MORGAN, Walter (50)
BROOKS, Cleveland (36)
ARZU, Cesareo (26)
STANLEY, Richardo (23)
GAYLE, Rupert (23)

2nd Mate
3rd Engr.
1st Engr.


Utility
Cadet
3rd Mate
Radio Op.
Steward/Purser


Coxswain
AS
AS


AS
AS


Master
Carpenter
Bosun
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
O.S.
O.S.
O.S.
Chief Engr.
2nd Engr
Reefer Chief
Oiler
Oiler
Fireman
Fireman
Wiper
Chief Cook
2nd Cook
Sallonman
Messman
Messman
Messman
Utility

Pomona, CA
New Orleans, LA
Boston, MA


Hulten Beach, NY
New Orleans, LA
Miami, FL
New Hyde Park, NY
New Orleans, LA











Danish
Spanish
Norwegian
Norwegian
Honduran
Honduran
Honduran
Honduran
Honduran
British
Danish
Spanish
Honduran
Honduran
Honduran
Honduran
Honduran
British
Honduran
British
Honduran
Honduran
Honduran
Honduran


SS SAN GIL
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: United Fruit Co.
Master: Walter W. Koch (44) American
Built: Belfast, No. Ireland 1920
Gross Tons: 3627
Dimensions: 325' x 46' x 30'
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS SAN GIL, was torpedoed by the German U-lO3 (Werner Winter) at 2350 EST on February 3, 1942 in position 38-12 N./74-42 W. while en route from Puerto Cortes, Honduras to Philadelphia with a full cargo of Bananas. She was making about 13 knots, sailing alone, and not zigzagging. The ship was completely blacked out and was unarmed.
On board was a crew of 41 men. Two men in the engine room were killed in the explosion.
A torpedo struck the SAN GIL on the port side in the engine room causing immediate flooding. The port lifeboat was destroyed as was the radio equipment. Messages of distress were sent on the emergency transmitter. The ship listed sharply to starboard.
About 20 minutes after the torpedo struck the sub surfaced and commenced shelling the ship from the starboard side. There were about 8-12 direct hits but did not sink the ship. About 0030 on February 4th a 2nd torpedo hit the ship amidships on the starboard side causing the SAN GILL to sink in 5 minutes.
The ship was abandoned in one boat about 10 minutes after the first attack. A second boat left the ship about 10 minutes later. The shelling did not commence until the second boat had cleared the ship.
The 39 survivors were rescued by the USCG NIKE (WPC-112) on the 4th of February. The file on this ship does not show where the survivors were landed but it could be assumed that it was Lewes, Delaware as it was the closest point to where the survivors were found.

The U-103 was bombed and sunk while berthed at Kiel, Germany on April 15, 1945. It was out of com- mission when sunk. There was no crew aboard.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
KOCH, Walter W. (44)
JENSEN, Jens R. (46)
SOUTAR, James (42)
ADAMS, Franklin W. (23)
PORTER, David C. (45)
VASQUES, Manuel (36)
SHARP, Thomas R. (57)
TURNER, John (20)

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
BARBE, Beaumont (26)
CASTRO, Secondino (36)

Master
Chief Mate
2nd Mate
3rd Mate
1st Engr.
Ch.Reefer Engr.
Steward/Purser
2nd Cook


3rd Engr.
3rd Reefer Engr.

Canasota,NY
Brooklyn, NY
Astoria, NY
Mt. Vernon, NY
Yonkers, NY
New York, NY
Elmhurst, NY
Cleveland, OH


Belgian
Spanish


SS SAN PABLO
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: United Fruit Co.
Master: Not known - Crew list not available.
Built: Belfast, No. Ireland 1915
Gross Tons: 4103Dimensions: 315'x 44'x 28'
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS SAN PABLO, owned by the United Fruit Company, was Bareboat Chartered to the War Shipping Administration and then Time-Chartered back to the United Fruit Company on May 16, 1942 at the port of New Orleans.
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS SAN PABLO, was torpedoed by the German U-161 (Albrecht Achilles) on July 2, 1942 at 2110 local time while the ship was berthed at the dock in Port Limon, Costa Rica discharging cargo. The dock area was fully illuminated at the time.
At 2001 local time, two torpedoes struck the ship in #1 and #2 holds. The ship flooded immediately and quickly settled to the bottom with only her superstructure above water. The ship quickly flooded due to the fact that all watertight doors between the cargo holds had been left open.
On March 6, 1943, after the ship had been raised from the bottom, the tug CRUSADER took her in tow bound for Tampa but had to stop at Puerto Castilla for fuel arriving there on March 12th. Arrived Key West on March 24th and departed on the 26th arriving Tampa on March 28th for repairs. The War Shipping Administration declared her a Total Constructive Loss on September 10, 1943. She was towed to Panama City,Florida arriving there on December 12, 1943 for scrapping.
One crew member, a Fireman on watch in the engine room, was killed in the explosion. He was an American citizen. Also 23 Longshoremen working in the holds were killed. Records show that these men were residents of Port Limon. Nine were Costa Ricans, 13 were British subjects, and one was a Panamanian. The Fireman's body was never found.
At the time of the attack all but three crew members were ashore. All the stevedores were trapped in #1 and #2 holds when the explosion occurred.

U-161 (Achillis) was sunk off Bahia, Brazil in position 1_2-30 S./35-35 W. by U.S. Navy plane VP-74. There were no survivors.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN LOST
BURNS, Clem (47)
Fireman
New Orleans, LA


SS SCAPA FLOW
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: American-West African Line
Master: Samuel Newbold Mace (Lost) American
Built: Flensburg, Germany 1914
Gross Tons: 4836
Dimensions: 412' x 55' x 65' (Coal Burner)
Former Names: (a) LUBECK (b) TRELWAN (c) AIRTHRIA (d) ANJA
The SS SCAPA FLOW, ex Finnish ANJA, was confiscated by the U.S. under an Executive Order at the Port of Baltimore on December 27, 1941 and turned over to the War Shipping Administration. The WSA then allotted the ship to the American-West African Line on January 3, 1942 for operation under a GAA agreement at Baltimore.
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS SCAPA FLOW, was torpedoed by the German U-134 (Rudolp Schendel) at 1430 ship time on November 14, 1942, while en route alone from Freetown, Sierra Leone to Philadelphia via Trinidad, with a cargo of 4500 tons of Manganese ore, 1500 tons of Latex in drums, and 500 tons of baled rubber.
The ship's complement consisted of 47 crew members and 13 U.S. Naval Armed Guard. The Master and 25 crew members and 7 Navy gunners were lost. Six of the Navy men were pinned under the after gun deck which had collapsed from the explosion and went down with the ship as they were unable to free themselves. The 7th Navy gunner died in the boat.
The SCAPA FLOW left New York on August 1, 1942 loaded with 7500 tons of general cargo, mostly war supplies for West African ports. Her Master was Samuel Newbold Mace, 44 years old, of Map[ewood, NJ. On board was a multi-national crew of which 22 were American seamen.
After stopping at Key West for orders on the 7th of August, she arrived at Trinidad on August 27th. Left Port of Spain on September 1st and arrived Takoradi on the 13th. All cargo was discharged at that port. From Takoradi, the ship proceeded to various West African ports picking up cargo. Her last port was Freetown leaving there on November 8, 1942.
At 1430 on November 14, two torpedoes struck the ship on the port side, the first hitting under the bridge and the 2nd torpedo at #3 hatch, a little forward of the fireroom. At the time of the attack she was sailing alone, making a speed of 6-1/2 knots due to one boiler being shut down for repairs. When the torpedoes hit, the bottom of the ship seemed to fall out. She settled below the water in less than a minute. Survivors said the German wasted a torpedo because one would have done the job as the ship was in such a dilapidated condition.
The ship was equipped with four wooden lifeboats plus one metal boat which had been obtained from the Liberty ship SS JOHN CARTER ROSE at some port where they had been berthed together. Also on board were 4 square rafts and a donut type raft. (The JOHN CARTER ROSE was torpedoed and sunk on October 8, 1942).
The ship was abandoned at once. The 4 wooden boats broke up as they hit the water. The metal boat from the ROSE came to the surface after the ship went down. Four of the rafts also surfaced. Survivors climbed on the rafts and later got in the boat. At 1000 the next morning all supplies were taken from the rafts. The rafts were set adrift. The number of survivors in this boat was 28 men, 21 merchant crew and 7 Navy gunners. One Navy gunner died in this lifeboat and was buried at sea.
The survivors were picked up on December 1, 1942 by HMS ARMERIA K-187 and landed at Freetown on December 7th. They were repatriated from Freetown on January 1, 1943 arriving New York on January 15th.
Survivors stated that two of the merchant crew went down with the ship attempting to launch the life rafts. They also stated that the stern of the boat was badly damaged but a life preserver was jammed into the opening which stopped the flow of water into the boat. It proved to be very seaworthy after that for it survived for 17 days including several days of very rough weather.
Survivors also stated to Naval authorities that the gun decks on this ship were very dangerous being of flimsy construction. They vibrated terribly when the ship was underway. The faulty construction of the after gun deck was the cause of the loss of the 6 Navy gunners aft.
Survivors were questioned by the U-Boat Commander and were given a tin of bandages. He asked for the Master and Chief Engineer but was told they went down with the ship.

The U-134 (H-C Brosin) was sunk on August 24, 1943 in position 42-07 N./9-30 W. by RAF Sqdr. #179. There were no survivors.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
BENNETT, Francis (19)
CARMANA, Joseph M. (26)
GEMZA, James (36)
GINNELLY, William B. (19)
HOMOLKA, Alois (23)
KENNEDY, Robert L. (25)
MACE, Samuel N. (44)
MARTIN, John (41 )
OWEN, Alfred J. (49)
SANZ, Peter 0. (47)
SPERKA, John E. (21)
McGINN, Peter J. (36)
SZCZEPANIAK, William L. (21)
WALLDORF, Theodore M. (30)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
TAYLOR, Goerge K.
BARNES, Kenneth L.
DEES, Worth O.
DOYLE, Lawrence W.
DUNN, Clyde L.
HUTCHINSON, Walter T.
WOMBLE, Curran B.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
BENSON, Robert E. (19)
BOOTH, Milton (24)
AMMAR, Aly (44)
COLON, Jose R. (18)
DOWDY, Rowland F. (27)
HACKETT, Fred (33)
McLAUGHLIN, Charles (28)
SKA'FFEBOL, Lars (26)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
DOAN, William H.
DUBE, Julian A.
COLEMAN, Ray W.
DeSARRO, Victor
SMITH, William C.
WALTERS, Ernest K.

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
CASTANEDA, Domingo (26)
COSTA, Candido (41)
DaSILVA, Alfredo A. (43)
DeSILVA, Jose F. (47)
DOYLE, Harry (?)
GERALDO, Joao R. (20)
HERDMAN, Robert (52)
MATEUS, Joquin (37)
OKASHA, Ahmed (38)
SHONUDA, Wadie I. (30)
VUKADINOVICH, Sava (47)
LEIKANGER, Odd (?)

FOREIGN SEAMEN SURVIVORS
KIIL, Niels (24)
RANNIK, Ants (22)
BAGATAIS, Arnold (20)
THOMSON, Kenneth G.
MONTEIRO, Gregorio (40)
SENA, Jose J. (26)
ElWl, Abdelkadar (23)
FADL, Ahmed M. (29)
DeMATTA, Joao (32)
SAID-HAHALA, lskander (34)
AMMAR, Aly (44)
DeSILVA, Leon (21)
LOPEZ, Rudolpho (37)
BROMMSTAAD, Albert (?)

O.S.
3rd Mate
Oiler
Eng. Cadet
Coal Passer
Oiler
Master
Ch. Cook
2nd Mate
Ch. Steward
Coal Passer
Messman
O.S.
Chief Mate


Lt. jg
S 2c
AS
S 2c
AS
Coxswain
AS


Deck Cadet
2nd Engr.
2nd Cook
A.B.
A.B.
O.S.
Messman
Utility


S 2c
S 2c
AS
S 2c
S 2c
S 2c


Radio Op.
Fireman
A.B.
Fireman
Fireman
Fireman
Chief Engr.
Fireman
Coal Passer
Fireman
Fireman
Carptenter


4th Mate
Bosun
A.B.
A.B.
A.B.
3rd Engr.
4th Engr.
Oiler
Fireman
Fireman
2nd Cook
Messman
Messman
Chief Engr.

Accord, NY
New York, NY
Throop, PA
Philadelphia, PA
Chicago, IL
Cleveland, OH
Maplewood, NJ
New York, NY
St. Louis, MO
New York, NY
Chicago, IL
New York, NY
Roselle, NJ
Richmond Hill, NY







(Died in lifeboat)



New Haven, CT
Philadelphia, PA
Brooklyn, NY
Rio Piedeas, P.R.
Helena, GA
Clementon, NY
Brooklyn, NY
Oakland, CA










Bangued, P.I.
Portugal
Brazil
Portugal
British
Portugal
British
Portugal
Egyptian
Egyptian
Yugoslavia
Norwegian


Danish
Estonian
Latvian
British
Brazilian
Portuguese
Egyptian
Egyptian
Brazilian
Egyptian
Egyptian
British
Brazilian
Norwegian


MS SHEHERAZADE
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Marine Transport Line, Inc.
Master: Trygve O.B. Wold - American
Built: Le Trait, France 1935
Gross Tons: 13,467
The MS SHEHERAZADE, a Panamanian flag tanker, was turned over to the War Shipping Administration by the French government on February 7, 1942 at Mobile, Alabama. On February 18, 1942 at 12:01 AM she was Bareboat Chartered to the Marine Transport line at Mobile. Registry was changed to the country of Panama.
The Panamanian flag tanker, MS SHEHERAZADE, was torpedoed by the German U-158 (Erich Rostin) on June 11, 1942 at 0455 EWT in position 28-41 N./91-20 W. (about 20 miles west of Ship Shoal Buoy) while en route from Newport News to Houston in ballast and unescorted.
Total complement on board was 44 merchant crew and 15 U.S. Naval Armed Guard. One crew member, the 2nd Cook, was lost. He was a Canadian citizen. All others survived.
At 0455 EWT, one torpedo struck on the starboard side amidship. Following that another torpedo struck in the starboard bunker tank destroying all power facilities and stopping the engines. As a result of these two torpedoes the ship took a 45 list to starboard. At 0505 EWT, a third torpedo hit the ship in the engine room on the starboard side. Immediately after this, the ship capsized with the bottom up. After the tanker had capsized, the U-158 fired 8 rounds from her deck gun into the hull of the ship.
The ship was abandoned at 0503. The MIDSHIPMAN, a shrimp boat, picked up 26 survivors from the ship's launch and 9 others who had jumped overboard. These 35 survivors were landed at Morgan City, Louisiana on June 1 lth at 2300 EWT. A lifeboat containing 23 survivors was picked up by the F/V 40 FATHOMS on June 11, 1942 at 0830 and landed at Morgan City at 1640 on the same day.

The U-158 (Rostin) was sunk on June 30, 1942 west of Bermuda in position 32-50 N./67-28 W. by U.S. Navy plane VP-74. There were no survivors.

FOREIGN SEAMAN LOST
CHAPMAN, Thomas (36)

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
WOLD, Trygve O.B. (50)
KATSARES, Peter (33)
LENANDER, Magnus P. (64)
TONKINS, John W. (43)
ACKERMAN, Charles E. (29)
O'CONNELL, William F. (39)
MARTINUS, Fred, Jr. (17)
FIELDS, Russell G. (17)
SUNOSK1E, Albert J. (29)
DORE, Franklin G. (22)
McLAUGHLIN, James H. (45)
LEVINSKY, Jack (36)
JACOBS, Charles (25)
CROOKER, Arthur D. (17)
WILLIAMS, Willis (24)
O'HARA, Michael (39)

2nd Cook


Master
Ch. Mate
3rd Mate
Radio Op.
A.B.
O.S.
O.S.
O.S.
Oiler
Oiler
Fireman
Wiper
Wiper
Messman
Messman
Messman

Winsor, Ontario Canada


New York, NY
New York, NY
New York, NY
Hastings, NY
Houston, TX
Bronx, NY
Shreveport, LA
Rockaway, NY
Readlyn, IA
Elizabeth, NJ
Brooklyn, NY
New York, NY
Long Island City, NY
Norway, ME
Brooklyn, NY
New York, NY


SS SIR HUON
Home Port: Panama City, R,P.Winsor, Ontario,
Company: U.S. Lines (Chartered to Isthmian Line)
Master: Azel H.B. Broner (60) Danish
Built: Nakskov, Denmark 1928
Gross Tons: 6049
Former Name: COLUMBIA
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS SIR HUON, ex Danish COLUMBIA, was taken over by the U.S. in the Port of Baltimore under Public Law 101 on July 17, 1941. The ship was turned over to the War Shipping Administration for operation. The WSA assigned the ship to the U.S. Lines under a GAA agreement on the same day, July 17, 1942 at Baltimore.
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS SIR HUON, was torpedoed by the German U-66 (Friedrich Markworth) at 0344 GCT on Augsut 30, 1942 while en route alone, from Port Elizabeth, South Africa to Baltimore via Port of Spain, Trinidad, carrying 7627 tons of cargo which included Chrome ore, Wool, Asbestos, and a deck cargo of damaged Italian and German tanks captured in Libya. They were loaded on the forward deck.
On board was a crew of 37 and a U.S. Naval Armed Guard contingent of nine (9). The crew was made up of 10 different nationalities. There were no Americans in this crew.
A torpedo struck the ship on the port side at #2 hatch. The explosion blew away the forward deck. There was immediate flooding causing the ship to list to port. The engines were stopped as it was impossible to maneuver. The SIR HUON sank at 0453 GCT, plunging bow first.
The ship was abandoned in 2 lifeboats. One boat, containing 23 survivors was picked up by the Panamanian flag freighter TAMBOUR on September 4th and landed at Paramaribo, Dutch Guiana on September 6, 1942. The other boat, containing 23 survivors, was picked up by the Argentine tanker THIRTEENTH DICEMBRE on September 3rd and landed at Curacao on September 7th. All hands were saved.

The U-66 (Gerhard Seehausen) was sunk on May 6, 1944 off Cape Verde Islands in position 17-17 N./32-29 W. by the USS BUCKLEY (DE 51) and aircraft from the USS BLOCK ISLAND (CVE-21). Twenty-four of the crew of the U-66 were lost and 36 were taken prisoner.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
BRYANT, R.J. (24)
BENTLEY, B.B. (25)
BRAY, R.L. (18)
CALLISON, W.T. (21)
LOMBARDO, A.G. (24)
STEVENS, J.C. (20)
STORCHI, W.A. (31)
ADAMS, E.T. (17)
DuPUIS, E.D. (17)

Ensign
AS
AS
AS
Coxswain
AS
AS
AS
AS

Eggertsville, NY
Villarica, GA
Thomasville, N
Chicopee, GA
Caidwell, NJ
Ada, OK
Oklahoma City, OK
Columbus, GA
Tampa, FL


SS STANVAC CALCUTTA
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Socony Vacuum Oil Co.
Master: Gustaf O. Karlsson
Built: Quincy, MA 1941
Gross Tons: 10,169
Dimensions: 501' x 68' x 37'
Capacity: 134,000 barrels
The SS STANVAC CALCUTTA was requisitioned by the War Shipping Administration for war service at Covenas, Colombia on April2.5, 1942.
The tanker, SS STANVAC CALCUTTA, was attacked and sunk by the German Armed Raider, STIER, ex German CAIRO (also known as Schiff 23), under the command of Captain Horst Gerlach, on June 6, 1942 at 1012 ship's time. The ship was en route from Montevideo, Uruguay to Caripito, Venezuela in ballast and unescorted. She had left Montevideo on May 29, 1942. The attack took place about 500 miles off the coast of Brazil.
On board was a complement of 42 merchant crew and 9 Naval Armed Guard. Of this number, 14 merchant seamen were killed in the attack plus 3 Navy gun crew. One crew member, the 1st Engineer, died in Camp Fukuoka, a Japanese POW camp. Eleven crew members were wounded.
The attack commenced at 1012 ship's time. When the Master arrived at the bridge, along with the Chief Mate, the STIER was sighted about 4 points off the port bow about 4 miles distant. The STIER raised the International Code Signal to "STOP ENGINES". The Master of the CALCUTTA then ordered the ship to slow speed until the Chief Mate spotted the German ensign flying from the mainmast. Captain Karlsson then called for full speed and hard right rudder to run away from the STIER. He then gave orders to open fire from both the forward and the after gun.
Both guns fired about 20 to 25 shells each, two of which hit the STIER at the forward mast, the other entering the crew's quarters aft of #5 hatch wounding two men.
The STIER replied with 148 rounds of 5.9 inch and a torpedo which caused terrible damage and the sinking of the ship.The ship listed rapidly and became dead in the water settling by the stern. The Chief Mate tried to correct the list with ballast but noticing the ship was dead in the water and out of commission, he returned to the bridge where he found the Master and the man at the wheel both dead and the body of the Radio Operator near the Radio Room.
All the survivors were picked up by the STIER. Martin Hyde, an Ordinary Seaman, died of his wounds on board the STIER on June 7th and was buried at sea with an American flag draped over him. The service was conducted by a shipmate.
The survivors of the CALCUTTA, wounded and unwounded, remained together until June 12th, when the German supply tanker, MS CHARLOTTE SCHLIFMANN, fueled the STIER. It was at this time that 24 of the survivors (17 merchant crew and 7 Navy men) and all unhurt, were put aboard the supply tanker. At some unknown date, they were transferred to the German freighter, DOGGERBANK (ex British SPEYBANK) which took them to Japan where they were imprisoned at Camp Fukuoka.
The remaining survivors, all wounded, were kept aboard the ST1ER until July 27th. At this time ten of them were put aboard the tanker CHARLOTTE SCHLIEMANN, which had returned to fuel the STIER. An A.B. from the CALCUTTA, was kept aboard the STIER, too badly wounded to be moved.
This tanker took these ten from the CALCUTTA to Japan landing them at Yokohama in October 1942. They were imprisoned at Camp Osaka where they were kept until the end of hostilities.
Sixteen of the crew members survived for the duration of the war. The 1st Engineer, Arthur R. Mont, died in this camp in March 1944. The A.B., Sahadi Hassan, left on the STIER-was yet to experience another sinking.
On September 27, 1942, the STIER became embroiled in a gun fight with the American Liberty Ship SS STEPHEN HOPKINS. The STIER was so badly damaged the ship had to be abandoned and eventually sunk, All survivors of the STIER, iincluding Hassan, were taken aboard the German blockade runner TANNENFELS. The TANNENFELS landed at Bordeaux where Hassan was placed in Val de Grace hospital. When he had recovered from his wounds he was sent to a German POW camp for merchant seamen at Milag und Milag. He was liberated on April 28, 1945 by the advancing Allied armies.
When the CALCUTTA failed to arrive at Caripito on the due date, which was June 19th, concern for her safety was felt. As the days and weeks passed, it had to be assumed the ship and its crew had disappeared.
On November 20, 1942, death certificates were issued for all the crew members by the War Shipping Administration and War Risk insurance benefits were paid to the next of kin.
Ten months later, on March 19, 1943, a letter to Socony Vacuum from Sahidi Hassan, who was in a hospital in France, suffering from wounds, and asking for shoes and cigarettes and anything else that was convenient to send through the Red Cross. These things were sent to him with a letter asking how he had become wounded. The Company checked the crew list of the CALCUTTA and discovered he was on the ship when she left Montevideo.
On May 17, 1943, the company was informed by Washington that 27 crew members of the CALCUTTA were prisoners of war in Japan. When this became known the WSA revoked the death benefits and attempts were made to get the War risk insurance money paid back to the government.
The "STANVAC CALCUTTA" was awarded the Gallant Ship Citation. (See Page 552)

U.S. MERCHANT CREW LOST
KARLSSON, Gustaf O.
DEWHURST, Charles E.
DEFAULT, Louis E.
HEATH, Philip A.
LARSEN, Kenneth J.
OKANDER, Nelden W.
CHAMPAGNE, John W.
HYDE, Martin W.
HILLS, Aloysius W.
DOCKENS, Lewis V.
ARRANTk, Selmon J.
KNOWLES, Harold F.
MAVIS, lnnocente
DANIEL, James M.
MONT, Arthur R.

MERCHANT CREW SURVIVED
IN POW CAMP FUKUOKA, JAPAN
WALKER, Richard J.
WILLIAMS, Hoyt
ELLIOT, Philip C.
POLK, Paul L.
JOHNSON, Albert E.
HARRIS, Dick
KILLOUGH, Morris G.
LANGSTON, Herschel
SIEJAK, Frank T.
MANLEY, John W.
INGE, Edress E.
BERNSTEIN, Joseph
DeLaHOUSSAYE, J.N.
CLARK, Wilmer J.
FREDERICK, Jean
STILLWELL, Fred G.

MERCHANT CREW SURVIVED
IN POW CAMP OSAKA, JAPAN
KNUDSEN, Aage
MAYNARD, G. Robert
SMITH, Wescott
REED, James C.
SMALL, Robert J.
GRIMM, George H.
SARRAZIN, Hatswol E.
DeLONG, Alvin E.
BROWN, Macon St. Paul
LASTRA, Jose

MARLAG und MILAG, GERMANY
HASSAN, Sahidi

Master
2nd Mate
4th Mate
Radio Oper.
A.B
A.B.
A.B
O.S.
Oiler
Wiper
Wiper
Chief Cook
Messman
Messman
1st Asst Engr.



2nd Engr.
4th Engr.
A.B.
A.B.
O.S.
O.S.
Oiler
Oiler
Fireman
Fireman
Wiper
Wiper
2nd Cook
Messman
Messman
Messman



Chief Mate
3rd Mate
Bosun
A.B.
Chief Eng.
3rd As. Eng.
Pumpman
Fireman
Steward
Messman


A.B.

(killed on the bridge)




(killed on the bridge, Helmsman)

(Died from wounds on the STIER)






(Died in POW camp Mar 1944)





































SS STANVAC MANILA
Home Port: Panama, R.P.
Company: Socony Vacuum Oil Co.
Master: Gustav Benton
Built: Quincy, MA 1941
Gross Tons: 10,138
Dimensions: 501' x 68' x 37'
Capacity: 134,000 barrels
The Panamanian flag tanker, SS STANVAC MANILA, was torpedoed by the Japanese submarine 1-17 (Hakue Harada) at 0410 ship's time on May 23, 1943 in position 23-44 S./166-30 E. (about 75 miles from Noumea) while en route from New York to Noumea, New Caledonia with a full load of Navy fuel, 150 tons of machinery for the Navy, and 6 Motor Torpedo boats on deck. She left New York on April 2nd and Balboa, C.Z. on May 3rd.
On board was a complement of 165 men consisting of 50 merchant crew, 27 U.S. Naval Armed Guard, and 88 U.S. Navy personnel of different ratings who were crew members of the 6 PT boats on deck. Eight (8) of the merchant crew, 3 of the Navy gunners, and one crew member of the PT Squadron were lost. Eleven crew members were hospitalized at Noumea.
The torpedo struck the ship at 0410 on the port side in the engine room and crew quarters, destroying the engine room and crew quarters directly above. The vessel carried its way for another 3 miles before stopping.
Three boats and 2 rafts were launched. The 6 PT boats floated free as the ship settled. Two of them were so badly damaged they had to be sunk by Navy personnel. One lifeboat, with 20-25 men in it, was overturned on top of these men when a huge wave hit the boat while it was alongside the ship. All of these men were forced to swim away from the ship as it setfied. They were picked up by the PT boats. Later in the day the Mine Layer USS PREBLE (DM 20) came on the scene and towed all 4 PT boats into Noumea.

The 1-17 (Harada) was sunk August 19, 1943 by the New Zealand Armed Trawler TU1 and U.S. Navy Squadron VS-57 in position 23-26 S./16-50 E. or about 40 miles SE of Noumea Bay. Six survivors were taken prisoner.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN LOST
TILLEY, Leroy

FILIPINO SEAMEN LOST
ARMASO, Victor
MASA, Catalino
CACITOIT, Apalonio
SALLADER, Gervasio
de VEGA, EIpidio M.
PALASPAS, Nicolas
FLORES, Santiago

Jr. 3rd Engr.


O.S.
Fireman
Fireman
Ch. Cook
2nd Cook
Messman
Galleyman


SS STANVAC MELBOURNE
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Socony Vacuum Oil Co.
Master: Andrew T. Lagan (Lost on the SS BRILLIANT)
Built: Chester, PA 1941
Gross Tons: 10,103
Dimensions: 520' x 68' x 37'
Capacity: 138,523 barrels
The Panamanian flag tanker, SS STANVAC MELBOURNE, was torpedoed and damaged by the German U-203 (Rolf Mutzelburg) at 0030 and O113 EWTon April 12, 1942 while en route from New York to ,a, ruba in ballast and unescorted, while in position 33-42 N./ 77-35 W. (About 15 miles from Frying Pan Shoal Inside Buoy).
On board was a complement of 40 merchant crew and 8 U.S. Naval Armed Guard. Three crew members were lost abandoning ship.
At 0030 EWT, an explosion was heard from under the after part of the ship which jarred the ship and tripped the automatic alarm. The engines were stopped and the ship was examined for damage. None was found so the ship resumed her headway at 0037 on the same course but not zigzagging. At 0113, a torpedo struck on the port side at #7 tank causing the ship to list to port and opening a hole 30' x 30' in the hull and also several small holes on the starboard side. A distress call was sent and it was answered.
At 0120, the ship was abandoned by all hands except the Master, an Oiler, and a Navy gunner. Lifeboats #1-2-4 were launched without difficulty but #3 boat had some difficulty when the securing strap fouled the hand grabs while the boat was being lowered. The boat was on its beam ends for a minute. At that time a sea lifted the boat and ripped off the grabs from the boat. The boat then righted and became waterborne and the releasing gear let go. Only one man was in this boat. Three other crew members were on rafts and then taken aboard #2 boat.
The Chief Mate, who was in charge of #2 boat, related how he observed 2 submarines on the surface after #2 boat had drifted to a point about 500 feet off the port quarter of the MELBOURNE. About 0130, one of the subs surfaced under #2 boat, completely capsizing it with all the occupants underneath. As a result of this action, two men later perished in the boat after it was righted. Both were buried at sea from the boat. This boat, (#2 boat) and its occupants, were rescued about 1320 on April 12, by the USS PC 472. They were later transferred to CG 186 which landed them at Southport, NC at 0153 on April 14th.
The 14 survivors in #4 boat were picked up by the MV WILLIAM PENN and were put ashore at Morehead City, NC.
The Master, an Oiler, and the Navy gunner in charge of the Armed Guard had remained aboard. At 0130, the Master let go the port anchor hoping the boats might be able to get back aboard. However, rough seas prevented this from happening. The three men still onboard stayed there all night.
Later on in the afternoon of April 12th, two tugs and the Armed Trawler HMS NORTHERN DUKE came alongside and assisted in the raising of the anchor and rigging the towing hawser. Towing commenced that night and continued through the next day (13th) arriving at a safe anchorage in Southport, NC that night. The next day the tow proceeded to Wilmington, NC arriving on the same day, the 14th. The crew returned aboard on the 16th. The ship was fully repaired at Charleston, SC and returned to service on July 2, 1942.

The U-203 (Hermann Kottmann) was sunk April 25, 1943 south of Greenland in position 55-05 N./42-25 W. by HMS PATHFINDER (G-10) and aircraft from HMS BITER. Eleven were lost and 38 taken prisoner.

U.S. MERCHANT CREW LOST
BAYA, Salah
PARKS, Robert
REVOLI, Paul

A.B.
Steward
A.B.

Disappeared after abandoning ship
Died in #2 boat
Died in #2 boat

The Panamanian flag tanker, SS STANVAC MELBOURNE, was torpedoed and sunk by the German U-515 (Werner Henke) at 0405 ship's time on Septmber 12, 1942, while en route from Para, Brazil to Aruba via Trinidad in ballast, in position 10-30 N./60-20 W. (About 15 miles SE of Emerald Shoals off Trinidad). The ship was sailing unescorted.
Her complement consisted of 40 merchant crew and 9 U.S. Naval Armed Guard. One crew member, an A.B., was lost after the 2nd torpedo hit.
At 0405 ship's time, a torpedo struck on the port side just forward of the bridge followed immediately by a second which struck just aft of the bridge. The ship listed 25 to port but still kept some headway until the Jr. 3rd Engineer, on watch in the engine room, stopped the engine. About 0425, a 3rd torpedo struck the stern, exploding in the engine room blowing holes in both sides of the ship. She finally sank at 0515 turning over and sinking by the stern with her bow straight up.
After the 2nd torpedo struck, the Master ordered abandon ship. All hands left the ship except the Master, 2nd Mate, Radio Operator, and an Able Seaman. After the 3rd torpedo hit, the Master, knowing the ship could not be saved, ordered them to get off the ship. The 2nd Mate jumped overboard but the other three climbed down the boat ladder into the water. They were picked up by #1 boat which was in charge of the Chief Mate.
At daybreak, the 3 boats together headed for Trinidad. About 2200 that night they landed near Toco Pt. where they were met by natives who took them to a house, They were then taken to the survivor's camp at Port of Spain remaining there until September 16th when they were put aboard a USAT ship for repatriation to the U.S.

The U-515 (Henke) was sunk April 9, 1944 north of Madeira (35-35 N./19-18 W. by 4 U.S. Destroyer Escorts. There were 44 survivors including the C.O. who was later killed in an escape attempt from a U.S. POW camp.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN LOST
SIDORO, Gallindo

A.B.

Philippine


SS STANVAC PALEMBANG
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Socony Vacuum Oil Co.
Master: Reider Oftedahl
Built: Chester, PA 1941
Gross Tons: 10,013
Dimensions: 520' x 68' x 37'
Capacity: 138,523 barrels
The Panamanian tanker, SS STANVAC PALEMBANG, was torpedoed by the German U-203 (Rolf Mutzelburg) at 2155 ship's time on July 11, 1942 in position 11-28 N/60-23 W. (About 15 miles off Tobago Island while en route alone, from Santos, Brazil to Port of Spain, Trinidad in ballast.
On board was a complement of 43 merchant crew and 7 U.S. Naval Armed Guard. Two crew members and 3 Navy gunners were lost. One crew member who survived this sinking was lost on the SS ROBERT E. LEE, the ship on which he was being repatriated to the U.S.
The 1st torpedo struck on the starboard quarter wrecking the engine room and stopping the engines. The Master ordered abandon ship. He and a few crew members plus the entire Navy crew remained aboard. In the meantime, the sub had surfaced and inquired among the two boats for the Master. Then another torpedo was fired striking the ship on the port quarter. He followed that with 36 rounds from the deck gun of the sub. Every shell was a hit on the ship. The ship sank at 2325 on July 11,1942.
The 2nd torpedo killed an Ordinary Seaman in his quarters directly above the blast and killed an Oiler in the Engine Room. The explosion from this torpedo blew up through the steering engine room and reduced the gun platform to a mass of twisted steel killing 3 of the 7 Navy gunners who were manning the aft gun. Three of the surviving Navy gunners then followed the Master to #2 boat in which they abandoned ship. While getting the boat away from the ship, the Master heard a faint cry. It was the fourth Navy gunner. He was told to go to the stern and jump. He did this and was picked up by that boat. He was badly injured.
The 45 survivors were picked up from 3 boats by the USS PC 8 at 1600 local time on July 12th and landed them at Port of Spain on the same day. They were being repatriated to New Orleans aboard the SS ROBERT E. LEE when that ship was torpedoed on July 30 near the entrance to the Mississippi River. The survivors were picked up by various rescue craft and taken to Venice, Louisiana. The survivors from the PALEMBANG were taken to New York by train.

The U-203 (Kermann Kottmann) was sunk April 25, 1943 south of Greenland in position 55-05 N/42-25 W. by HMS PATHFINDER (G 10) and aircraft from HMS BITER. Eleven were lost and 38 taken prisoner.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
FAJARDO, Miguel L.
LOPEZ, Manuel
MORENO, Alexander
The three merchant seamen lost were from the Philippines.

Oiler
O.S.
Oiler

(Killed in Engine Room)
(Killed in his quarters)
(Lost on ROBERT E. LEE)


SS STONE STREET
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Waterman SS Co.
Master: Harald Anderson (Taken prisoner)
Built: Monfalcone, Italy 1922
Gross Tons: 6131
Former Name: CLARA ex Italian
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS STONE STREET, was turned over to the War Shipping Administration by the Italian Societa Anonima Di Navigazione at 1000 on June 18, 1941 in the port of Savannah, Georgia. At 1200 noon of the same day, the WSA assigned the ship to the Waterman SS Company under a GAA agreement.
The SS STONE STREET was torpedoed by the German U-594 (Friedrich Mumm) at 1135 ship's time on September 13, 1942 in position 48-18 N./39-43 W. while en route from Liverpool to New York in ballast. This ship was a part of Convoy ON 127(s) #13 but had been ordered out of the convoy due to its continual smoking and straggling.
About 0100 on September 13th, while steaming in an area outside the convoy, explosions were heard and snowflakes were seen in the direction of the convoy. Upon seeing this, the Master changed course more to starboard to get further away from the convoy, a distance of about 12 miles.
At 1135 ship's time, a torpedo struck the ship in the engine room on the port side. Another torpedo barely missed the bow. No distress signal was sent due to the destruction of the antennas. The ship listed 45 to port with the engines still running and the screw still turning. Abandon ship was ordered immediately by the Master. One lifeboat and one raft was launched.
After the attack and the ship abandoned, a small sub surfaced followed by a large one. The smaller sub capsized the boat throwing the occupants into the water. They were taken aboard the U-594 and asked many questions and then put aboard the raft. The Master was kept aboard as a prisoner of war.
Survivors righted the lifeboat. Some got in the boat. The others stayed on the raft. The 40 survivors were picked up 6 days later on September 19th by the SS IRISH LARCH. They were landed at Saint John, New Brunswick on September 22nd. After spending the night there, they proceeded to New York via train arriving there at 1530 on the 25th.
There was a complement of 40 crew members and 12 U.S. Naval Armed Guard on board. Eleven crew members and two Navy man were lost. Six of those lost were American seamen. Norbert Amborski, U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Engine Cadet, was lost when the life line on which he was lowering himself into the boat broke. He was thrown into the rough seas and pulled under by the still turning propeller. John Watt, a 47-year-old Messman was lost trying to save Amborski. The Bosun, Tony Hendrickson, was killed by the explosion of the torpedo. The others either went down with the ship or drowned while trying to abandon the ship.
The STONE STREET was under the command of Harald Anderson, 57 years old, who lived in Floral Park, NY. He was a native of Denmark but had been an American citizen since 1922. He was taken prisoner by the Commander of the U-594 and spent the rest of the war in a German POW camp for merchant seamen. He continued to sail for Waterman after the war until 1949.
Articles were signed in New York about July 2, 1942. She left New York on July 6th, stopping at Woods Hole and departing there on July 9th in Convoy BX 28. Arrived Halifax on July 11 and departed July 19 in Convoy HX 199.
On July 22, engine and telemotor trouble forced the STONE STREET to leave the convoy at 2130 local time. She was ordered into St. John's Newfoundland arriving there at 1630 on July 23rd. After completing repairs, the ship left St. John's on August 11th arriving Belfast, No. Ireland on August 21 at 0750. Left Belfast on August 27 and arrived at Stalbridge Pier, Garsten, England on August 28th. Left there on September 5 - Convoy ON 127 (s).
The following information was taken from an excellent report submitted to the Vice Chief of Naval Operations concerning the loss of the SS STONE STREET. The report was made by Granville C. Geisert, Lt.(jg) Armed Guard officer of the ship.
The forward starboard boat (#1) was the only boat launched. The after starboard boat was lowered but the forward motion of the ship swamped it and crushed it against the side of the ship. The forward port boat (#2) was destroyed by the explosion. The aft port boat was thrown up on the boat deck and got tangled up in such a position that it could not be lowered. The after port raft was launched but the after starboard raft was jammed. Lifeboat #1, with Captain Anderson in charge, picked up the men floating in the water. There were 11 men on the raft that was safely launched.
Two of the Naval Armed Guard were lost while abandoning ship. One of them drowned when he could not swim any longer. He did not have a life jacket because he had stayed at the boat station helping to lower the boat wbich he was unable to reach after it was in the water. The other was blown overboard and struck by the screw mangling his legs. Although he had on a lifejacket, he drowned before he could be picked up.
At 1200, the periscope of a submarine passed within 20 feet of the raft holding the Armed Guard Officer and 10 men. At 1215 the STONE STREET sank and a submarine surfaced by another raft which held some survivors. Evidently this raft floated free as the ship sank. The sub approached the raft and asked for the Master and Chief Engineer. They were told to ask the lifeboat.
At 1225, a larger submarine surfaced and began signalling to the smaller one already surfaced. The smaller sub (U-594) approached the lifeboat and asked for the two officers. The 3rd Mate and the Master were taken aboard the sub and it pulled away from the boat. After a few minutes the sub returned to the boat and in the process capsized the lifeboat throwing all its occupants in the water. These men were taken aboard the U-594 while the sub commander tried to determine who was the Master plus asking many questions about the ship. Upon request the men were given whiskey, food, cigarettes, and matches.
After attempting to right the capsized boat, the 17 survivors were placed on 2 rafts. The U-594 then left with Captain Anderson. Before leaving, the Master placed the 3rd Mate and the Navy Coxswain in charge of the 2 rafts. The two were tied together by a line and drifted away together. The Armed Guard Officer was on the other pair of rafts with 11 men on each raft with Chief Mate Pedersen in charge. Also in the area was a swamped lifeboat with 7 survivors aboard but the rafts could not maneuver enough to go to their assistance.
On September 15 at 1000, the two rafts in charge of the Chief Mate and on which the Armed Guard officer was aboard, a capsized lifeboat was sighted. After two hours of propelling the two rafts toward the boat they finally reached it. The boat was righted and bailed out. It was found to be in useable condition with almost all the provisions and supplies intact. This was #1 boat, the one the Germans had capsized. All the provisions on the rafts were put aboard the boat. One raft was cast adrift but the other was secured to the boat. They commenced rowing in a SW direction.
On September 16 at 0500, a mast and flag was sighted about 4 miles to the westward. The boat altered course and came upon the swamped boat they had seen 3 days ago with the 7 men in it. They arrived alongside the boat at 1350. In the boat was one man still alive and the bodies of the 4th Engineer, Chief Steward, 2nd Engineer, an Oiler, Fireman, and Deck Engineer. They had died of exposure and some went overboard. The lone survivor in this boat was Walter Atkins, an A.B., an American. He was put on the raft tied to the boat along with the provisions from his boat.

On September 17 at 0600 these two rafts were picked up by the SS IRISH LARCH in position 48-50 N./40-00 W. The 17 men on the other rafts were picked up at 0130 that same morning. They had told the Master of the IRISH LARCH there were other survivors so the Master searched until the other 2 rafts were found.
U.S.MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
AMBORSKI, Norbert (20)
BOOKWALTER, Robt. (27)
CLOWER, Clyde (31)
EVANS, Robert (22)
HENDRICKSON, Anthony (43)
WATT, John (47)

U.S.NAV. ARMED GUARD LOST
MAKIN, Robert Calvin
McDONALD, Frank Bryan

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
DAVIES, Gordon (31)
JAKOBSEN, Kristian (42)
JOEL, Percy (?)
KAHN, Mohamed (?)
WILLIAMSON,Ernest (49)

U.S.MERCHANT SEAMEN SURV.
ATKINS, Walter (20)
BLACK, William (23)
BOLIVET, Marcel (58)
CURRIE, Robert (25)
GARDOCKI, Bernard (22)
HAYNE, A. Roger (20)
JOY, Stephen (24)
KELLY, Robert (42)
LEWIS, Roger (21)
MALONFY, James (37)
MORGAN, Andrew (42)
PASTER, J. (30)
ROSENTHAL, Harold (21)
SEE, Kenneth (21)
SANDOWSKI, Stanley (20)
SMITH, John (19)
VETTER, Robert (20)
WATT, Joseph (41)

U.S.NAV.ARMED GUARD SURV.
GEIBERT, Granville C.
CHATTERTON, Joseph J.
HEMLEY, Allen H.
MAHAR, John P.
McDONALD, Hugh L.
QUINN, Edward J.
SMITH Ruben L.
SPHON, Floyd E.
STANSFIELD, Charles R.
STARR, Jerome C.

Eng.Cadet
Utility
Oiler
Fireman
Bosun
Messman


As      (Drowned
S2c      (Washed


2nd Engr.
A.B.
4th Engr.
Deck Engr.
Ch. Steward


A.B.
O.S.
A.B.
Messman
Fireman
Oiler
Ch. Cook
1st Engr.
Wiper
A.B.
Messman
Wiper
O.S.
O.S.
Messman
Fireman
Deck Cadet
Messman


Lt. (jg)
Coxswain-BM2c
AS - SM
AS
S 2c
AS
S 2c
AS
AS
AS

Buffelo,NY
Clayton, MI
New York, NY (died in #3 boat)
Southbridge,MA (died in #3 boat)
Sea Cliff, NY
New York, NY


after abandoning ship)
overboard.Struck by propeller)


English (died in #3 boat)
Iceland
English (died in #3 boat)
India (died in #3 boat)
New Zealand (Died in #3 boat)


St. Louis, MO
Columbia, TN
Teaneck, NJ
Kearney, NJ
Chicago, IL
Plaquemine, LA
West Haven, CT
New York, NY (inj.)
Richmond Hills, NY
St. Louis, MO
West New York, NJ
Woodbridge, NJ
Monicello, NY
Brooklyn, NY
New Haven, CT
Salem, MA
Northfield, NY
New York, NY














The U-594 (Mumm) was sunk west of Gibraltar in position 35-55 N./9-24 W. by Hudson aircraft "F" of RAF Sqdr. #43. The U-599 was caught on the surface and sunk by 3 rockets. There were no survivors among her 50 man crew. The U-594 left St. Nazaire May 23, 1992 with orders to break through into the Mediterranean and join the 29th U-Boat Flotilla. She was sunk at 1503 on June 9,1943.

NOTE: Many thanks to Leonard Amborski for his donation of much of the data concerning the loss of the "STONE STREET". His brother, Norbert Amborski, was lost on this ship.


SS SYLVAN ARROW
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Socony Vacuum Oil Co.
Master: Arthur J. Beck
Built: Camden, NJ 1917
Gross Tons: 7797
Dimensions: 485' x 62' x 39'
Capacity: 99,742 barrels
The Panamanian flag tanker, SS SYLVAN ARROW, was torpedoed by the German U-155 (Adolph Piening) on May 20, 1942 at 0721 ship's time while en route from Curacao to Cape Town, South Africa with a full cargo of Bunker C oil, in Convoy OT-1 in position 11-22 N./62-14 W. This vessel left Curacao on May l8th in convoy with the British tanker BETHANCURIA and the Norwegian freighter RAPANA escorted by HMS HAVELOCK (H-88) and HMS LAVENDER (K-60).
The ship's complement was made up of 38 crew members and 6 U.S. Naval Armed Guard. One Navy gunner was lost.
The explosion of the torpedo blew fuel oil all over the tanker.In addition, the main deck was blown upward and outward. The entire midship section of the ship abaft the bridge was aflame with thick smoke. The ship continued speeding full ahead.
Boats #2 and #4 were launched. Boat #2 was safely launched even though burning fuel oil had set the falls on fire. This boat, in charge of the Chief Mate, rowed around the port bow to take off 22 men who were trapped on the bow by the flames. Boat #4 was safely launched with 12 men aboard in charge of the Chief Engineer. The forward starboard boat (#1) was destroyed by fire.
The entire Naval Armed Guard remained aboard ship to right the sub in case it surfaced but later were forced to aban don ship. They tried to launch #3 boat but could not so they were forced to jump overboard. They were later picked up by the USS BARNEY (DD-149) and not a moment too soon as they were coated with oil and exhausted. The other two boats were picked up by the BARNEY also. All were taken to Port of Spain, Trinidad.
The merchant crew became separated in two groups. The 26 men In #2 boat which was in charge of the Chief Mate, were at Port of Spain awaiting repatriation. The remaining 12 crew members including the Master were engaged in at tempting to salvage the help. The 26 men In Port of Spain were repatriated aboard the SS ROBERT E. LEE, arriving in New Orleans safely.
After 3 days of searching for the damaged ship, towing procedures were put into effect on May 26th. When the salvage tug began to tow the ship she began to rip apart and break up. The towing attempt was abandoned. The SYLVAN ARROW settled deeper into the sea, folding in the middle and sinking about 1700 on May 28th in position 12-50 N./67-32 W.
Captain Beck and his 11 men were taken to Curacao where they were cut off from the main body of the crew which was in Port of Spain. They left Curacao aboard the Dutch freighter, SS CRIJNSSEN on June 7, 1942. On June 10th, the CRIJNSSEN was torpedoed. Captain Beck and 6 of his fellow crew members of the SYLVAN ARROW found themselves in a lifeboat holding 31 persons including themselves. He assumed command of the boat and set a course for the Yucatan coast of Mexico. Eventually the boat reached the Mexican coast after being passed by several ships. Captain Beck and his 6 crew members were finally repatriated from Chetumal, Mexico by air to Brownsville, Texas and by train from there to New York.
The remaining 5 crew members of the SYLVAN ARROW were in another lifeboat from the CRIJNSSEN. They were picked up by the SS LEBORE carrying a full load of coal to Chile. On June 14th this ship was also torpedoed and they had to take to the boats again. This time they were in a crowded boat for 3 days before being picked up by the USS TATTNALL (DD 125) and landed at Cristobal. The boats were first sighted by a Patrol plane.

The U-155 (Altmeier) surrendered at Wilhelmshaven on June 10, 1945.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
WEATHERFORD, Charles


USNR



(Fell overboard from oil slicked gun platform and drowned.)


SS TAMBOUR
Home Port: Panama City, R.P.
Company: Alcoa SS Co.
Master: Halfdan Morland (30) Norwegian (Lost)
Built: Frederikstad, Norway 1917
Gross Tons: 1827
Former Name: FIDRA ex Finnish
The SS TAMBOUR, ex Finnish FIDRA, was taken over by the U.S. under Public Law #101 and turned over to the War Shipping Administration at St. Thomas, V.I, on December 27, 1941. The WSA in turn assigned the ship to the Alcoa SS Company on a Bareboat Charter on January 9, 1942. On May 2, 1942, Alcoa took over operation of the ship on a GAA agreement. The registry of the ship was changed to the Republic of Panama. On May 2nd, Alcoa signed the GAA agreement in Claymont, Delaware at 1400 EWT.
The Panamanian flag freighter, SS TAMBOUR, was torpedoed by the German U-174 (Heinrich Bruns) at 0640 ship's time on September 26, 1942 in position 8-50 N./59-50 W., while en route from Paramaribo, D.G. to Trinidad with a cargo of 2585 tons of Bauxite. The TAMBOUR left New York on June 16, 1942 bound for Trinidad. At no time during the entire trip from New York was there an escort for this ship.
On board was a complement of 29 merchant crew and 3 U.S. Naval Armed Guard. Eight (8) crew members were lost including one American citizen. The crew was made up of 12 nationalities.
At 0605 local time, a torpedo struck the ship on the starboard side between #3 and #4 hatches well below the water line. The explosion caused the deck to blow up, blew down the main mast, and cargo was blown high in the air. The TAMBOUR sank within one minute.
There was no time to launch boats. Survivors were either blown overboard or jumped overboard and climbed on rafts which had floated free. The 24 survivors were picked up on September 27th by the Norwegian SS THALATTA and landed at Port of Spain, Trinidad on September 28th.

The U-175 (Bruns) was sunk April 17, 1943 in position 48-50 N./21-20 W. by the USCGC SPENCER (WPG-36). There were 41 survivors. Thirteen were lost including the Commanding Officer Bruns.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMAN LOST
MARTIN, Arthur C. (29)

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
DONALD, Eugene V. (40)
MANFY, Thomas D. (20)
FANSHAWE, Albert G. (29)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
FLOYD, Donnie B. (18)
HAAS, Lester W. (27)
LAND, William M. (18)

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
MORLAND, Halfdan (30)
GRANT, John R. (18)
ANDERSON, Robert (27)
MACKIN, Edward M. (32)
BERNADINO, Jose (50)
LORENSEN, Hylje E. (30)
ABSOVEN, A. van (41 )

A.S.


Chief Mate
A.B.
Utility


S2c
S1c
S2c


master
Radio Op
3rd Engr
Donkeyman
Coal Passer
Ch Steward
Cook

St. Petersburg, FL








(In charge)



Norwegian
Canadian
British (Trinidad)
British (Scotland)
Portuguese
Norwegian
Dutch

Detail info about A. van Absoven can be found at the Netherlands War Graves Foundation


SS TELA
Home Port: Puerto Cortes, Honduras
Company: United Fruit Co.
Master: John Shiell (American)
Built: Belfast, No. Ireland 1927
Gross Tons: 3901
Dimensions: 357'x 31'
The SS TELA, a Honduran flag freighter, was Time Chartered to the War Shipping Administration on May 31, 1942 at the Port of New Orleans.
The Honduran flag freighter, SS TELA, was torpedoed by the German U-504 (Fritz Poske) at 0001 EST on June 8, 1942 while en route alone from New Orleans to Puerto Limon, Costa Rica via Panama City, Florida, with a full load of general cargo, in position 18-15 N./85-20 W. She left Panama City on June 4th.
On board was a complement of 50 merchant crew, 3 U.S. Naval Armed Guard, and one Costa Rican passenger. Of this number, 11 crew members were lost. Two more crew members died when the rescue ship MV PORT MONTREAL was herself torpedoed. Two of the 13 crew members lost were Americans. None of the Navy gunners were lost.
The TELA was hit by two torpedoes. The 1st hit on the port side in the engine room demolishing the entire area. The 2nd hit on e same side at #3 hatch setting the ship on fire. The TELA sunk at 0006 EST listing to port and then plunging by the stern.
The TELA was abandoned in two boats and 2 rafts. Eventually, all the survivors were placed in the two boats. They were picked up at 1230 EST on June 8th by the British MV PORT MONTREAL. On June 10, 1942 at 0505 EST, the PORT MONTREAL was torpedoed by the U-88 (Mertens) in position 12-17 N./80-21 W. All the survivors of the TELA abandoned safely in the two boats that got away from the PORT MONTREAL. These boats were picked up at 1715 EST on June 16 by the Colombian schooner HILDA and landed at Cristobal at 0700 EST on June 16th. Two crew members of the TELA died in the boats and were buried at sea.

The U-504 (Luis) was sunk on July 30, 1943 NW of Cape Ortegal, Spain in position 45-33 N./10-47 W. by British destroyers. There were no survivors.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
McAULIFFE, Kenneth (18)
NELSON, William Clark (47)

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
HANSEN, Josepth (42)
GALLAGHER, John J. (18)
JORGENSEN, Arne (46)
LUND, Christian (41 )
PAYNE, Wilbur V. (37)
NELSON, Francis W. (27)
SHIELL, John (50)

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD
POWELL, Richard B.
SCHUSTER, George E.
SPENCE, Curtis A.

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
BODDEN, Cyril (42)
CARRANZA, Ruben (23)
DAHLIN, Herbert (42)
ESCOTI, Jose (21)
ESPINOSA, Lazarus (20)
JERICHOW, Torben (23)
KNEAL, William B. (49)
MARTINEZ, Matri (27)
PALENCIA, Jose (30)
SIMONS, Alfred (23)
ZUNIGA, Heriberto

Eng. Cadet
Chief Engr.


1st Engr
Deck Cadet
Chief Mate
Radio Op
Jr Engr.
Purser
Master


Coxswain
AS
S2c


Carpenter
Oiler
3rd Engr.
Wiper
Fireman
2nd Engr
Ch Steward
Messman
Fireman
Oiler
Oiler

New Orleans, LA
Allston, MA


New Orleans, LA
Shamokin, PA
Boston, MA
New Orleans,LA
Boyce,LA
New Orleans,LA
Mandeville, LA


Baltimore,MD
Martinville,VA
Martinville, VA


Honduran
Honduran (Died in boat)
Danish
Honduran (Died in boat)
Honduran
Danish
British
Honduran
Honduran
Honduran
Oiler


MS WlNKLER
Home Port: Panama City,
Company: Atlantic Refining Co.
Master: Arthur Gasso (Norwegian)
Built: Glasgow 1930
Gross Tons: 6907
Dimensions: 421' x 58' x 35'
The Panamanian flag tanker, MS WINKLER, was Time Chartered to the War Shipping Administration at Aruba on April 20, 1942.
The Panamanian flag tanker, MS WINKLER, was torpedoed by the German U-223 (Karl Wachter) on February 23, 1943 at 0710 while en route from Avonmouth to New York via Belfast, No. Ireland in ballast, in Convoy ON 166 (#63).
The WINKLER left Belfast on February 11th. Extremely rough weather was encountered and on the 19th of February the convoy was only 600 miles from Ireland. On February 22nd at 2310 ship's time, one of the 4 diesel engines broke down causing the speed to be reduced to 8 knots while repairs were made. This caused the ship to fall astern of its original position (#63). At 0410 on February 23rd she had become the last ship in the convoy. At this time a torpedo hit the ship on its port side between #2 and #3 tanks. This torpedo was fired by the U-628 (Heinrich Hasenschar) in position 46-48 N./36-18 W. The ship was only damaged.
A survey showed the ship to be in good condition except for a slight list to port. At 0445, a sub surfaced about 500 yards directly ahead. The forward gun crew fired 5 shells at the conning tower scoring one possible hit as an explosion was seen. The crash dived at once.
At this time, survivors in lifeboats from another ship (SS GLITTRE, a Norwegian tanker, torpedoed by the U-628) signaled with a light to pick them up. The Master decided to pick them up and spent about 2 hours maneuvering to rescue them. About 0630, a corvette, HMS DIANTHUS, came upon the scene and ordered the Master to rejoin the convoy and to zigzag. The DIANTHUS followed the WINKLER after pick-up of the survivors in the boats.
At 0710 on February 23rd, with the gun crew still at battle stations and the crew at general quarters, two torpedos struck the ship on the port quarter, blowing out the bottom of the ship and causing her to sink within 45 seconds. The ship was not zigzagging at the time of this attack. These torpedoes were fired by the U-223.
It was impossible to launch any boats. Therefore all hands jumped overboard and clung to a raft which had been let go. The U-223 dove under the survivors so the DIANTHUS was unable to drop any depth charges.
The DIANTHUS picked up all the survivors at 0755 and headed for St. John's, Newfoundland arriving there about 0800 on February 26th. All the survivors were taken to Argentia on February 28 where they boarded the SS PONTIAC for Boston.
The ship's complement was made up of 33 merchant crew and 18 U.S. Naval Armed Guard. Of this number, 14 crew members and 5 Navy gunners were lost. Three of the crew members were Americans.

The U-628 (Hasenschar) was sunk July 3, 1943 in position 44-11 N./08-45 W. by RAF Sqdr. #224. There were no survivors. The U-223 (Peter Gerlach) was sunk north of Palermo, Sicily on March 30, 1944 by several British escort vessels. There were 27 survivors who were taken prisoner.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST
FONTENOT, Lee Joseph
FRIELING, Charles (45)
VALDEZ, Francisco

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST
ALSTON, William J.
BURDEN, Nick
DIAS, Mark A.
FORTUNA, Edward
WALKER, Ovay O.

U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN SURVIVORS
CHAPMAN, Edwin J.
LAGEMANN, Robert
NEWTON, Hubert
PRETTYMAN, Clifford
SANTIAGO, Felix
SKINNER, James

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD SURVIVORS
CHARLTON, Randolph
BELANGER, Francis P.
BURDETTE, Melvin
CLOUSE, William C.
DEWITT, Charles L.
DRISCOLL, John A.
FREY, Samuel A.
HUDYMA, Arthur N.
IMHOFF, George H.
LAVOIE, Joseph R.
PARSONS, Frank E.
PETERSON, Cecil W.
TICKER, Harold B.

FOREIGN SEAMEN LOST
BURG, Hendrich
BYBERG, Gustav
DRESSLER, Evald
EID, Hans (29)
JOHANNESSEN, Erling
JOHANSSON, Simon
McRAE, John
OLSSON, Svante
SJOBERG, Axel
SMITH, Hugh J.
VAN GANSEAN, Frans

A.B.
Messman
2nd Cook


S lc
GM 3c
S 2c
S 1c
S 1 c


A.B.
Wiper
Radio Op.
2nd Radio Op.
Messman
Oiler


S. Lt. (jg)
BM 2c
GM 3c
S lc
S 2c
S lc
S 1c
S 2c
S 1c
S 2c
S 1c
S 1 c
S 1c


Messman
Oiler
Wiper
Ch. Mate
2nd Mate
O.S.
A.B.
2nd Engr.
Oiler
O.S.
A.B.

Mamou, LA
Philadelphia, PA
Philadelphia, PA









Elton, LA
Oshkosh, WI
Marble, NC
Philadelphia, PA
New York, NY
Gilmer, TX

















Dutch
Norwegian
Danish
Norwegian
Norwegian
Iceland
Scotch
Swedish
Swedish
Scotch
Belgian


MS ZAANDAM
Home Port: Rotterdam
Company: Holland-American Line (Chartered to the War Shipping Administration)
Master: J.P. Wepster (Lost) Dutch citizen
Built: Rotterdam 1939
Gross Tons: 10,909
Dimensions: 480' x 64' - Twin screw - Speed 18 knots
The MS ZAANDAM, a Dutch cargo-passenger ship, was torpedoed by the German U-174 (Ulrich Thilo) on November 2, 1942 at 1627 local time, while en route from Capetown to New York with a cargo of 7000 tons of Copper and Chrome ore plus 600 tons of general cargo. The ship was in a zigzag pattern at the time. The attack took place in 01-25 N./36-22 W. (About 400 miles north of Receife, Brazil).
On board was a total of 299 persons consisting of 130 crew members and U.S. Naval Armed Guard. The remaining 169 persons were passengers being repatriated back to the U.S. Most of them were crew members and Armed Guard personnel, survivors from 5 Allied ships that had been previously torpedoed. Of this number 134 men were lost and 165 survived.
The torpedoed Atlied ships were the U.S. flag freighers COLORADAN, EXAMELIA, CHICKASAW CITY, SWIFTSURE, and the Panamanian flag freighter FIRETHORN.
At 1627 local time, a torpedo slammed into the port side in the area of the engine room. The tremendous explosion demolished the decks above and the crew's quarters. The main engines were wiped out and the entire engine room flooded.
The steering gear was also put out of action. The ship continued to flood rapidly on an even keel as the way was lost.
About 10 minutes after the 1st torpedo hit, another one struck on the port side between #2 and #3 hatches. The ZAANDAM immediately plunged by the bow and was out of sight in less than two minutes.
After the first torpedo hit, the crew prepared to abandon ship but the Master ordered the men out of the boats saying it was only a minor explosion in the engine room. He determined that a cylinder head had blown on one of the diesel engines.
Ensign dames Maddox, the Gunnery Officer in charge of the U.S. Naval Armed Guard unit on the ZAANDAM, ordered his men to man their Battle Stations but the Master told him it was just an internal explosion. Ensign Maddox argued with the Master saying the ship had been torpedoed. Those precious few minutes between the 1st and 2nd torpedo resulted in the loss of many more lives.
After the 2nd torpedo hit, #1-2-4 boats were launched along with 2 or 3 rafts. All the other boats were destroyed by the explosions. #2 boat capsized but was turned upright in the water. A number of men were forced to jump overboard and swim to the boats and rafts. Sharks, attracted by the blood of the wounded, caused much confusion and some casualties.
At 1645 the U-174 surfaced near Boats #2 and #4. After surfacing a young officer and 5 others climbed out on the conning tower. The officer, speaking poor English, ordered the nearest boat to row around to the starboard side. When the boat arrived alongside, the officer asked the following questions which were answered by the 2nd Mate of the ZAANDAM, K. Karssen.

Q. What ship?
A. ZAANDAM!

Q. Where from?
A. Capetown!

Q. Where to?
A. New York!

Q. Any injured?
A. Yes!

Q. We have no doctor on board. Are You a Raider?
A. No!

Q. Why such a large number of passengers?
A. They are survivors from other torpedoed ships!

Q. What ships?
A. SWIFTSURE, CHICKASAW CITY, COLORADAN, EXAMELIA, FIRETHORN.
    All sunk off Capetown!

Boats #1 and #4 containing 72 and 34 survivors respectively were picked up at 0900 GCT on November 7th by the U.S. tanker SS GULFSTATE. Two of the survivors died on that ship. Four other survivors, who were badly wounded, were transferred to the USS WINSLOW (DD-359) on November 8th and were landed at Belem, Brazil where they were hospitalized. All four recovered from their wounds. Their names are as follows:

BYNES, Anthony
LANDMAN, Charles J.
HOEN, Henrich
BELTMAN, R. Johannes
A.B.
--
--
--
SS MALAY
SS CHICKASAW CITY
MS ZAANDAM
MS ZAANDAM

Lifeboat #2 which had overturned upon launching was righted by several survivors in the water. When it was righted they found the bodies of the Chief Engineer of the ZAANDAM (Ebbeler) and a Javanese crew member of the ZAANDAM.
The men climbed into the boat and proceeded to pick up survivors in the water and from rafts in the vicinity until there were 60 persons aboard. They continued to search until no more could be found. Supplies of water and other items were transferred from the rafts to the boats.
The boat itself had been damaged and leaked in several places. There were many attempts to secure the leaks but it was necessary to bail the boat continuously.
The boat, under the command of W. Broekhof, a 2nd Mate on the ZAANDAM, made a landfall on November 10th after many days of bad weather and other ships passing them by without stopping. They landed in the area of Rio Preguigas near the town of Barreirinhas, Brazil. Shortly after landing two men died. They were Laurence Olsen, an A.B. from the SWIFTSURE and Seitze Stenekes, an A.B. from ZAANDAM. They were later buried in Barreirinhas.
With the help of a lcoal fisherman, Broekhof and Captain Matthews of the SW1FTSURE sailed a boat to the village of Pharo. Finding no one there to help, Captain Matthews went back to the beach and Broekhof borrowed a horse and rode to the nearest police station. From there he informed the British Consul in the town of Paranaiba, Brazil of the situation. The British Consul notified the American Consul in Belem. He made arrangements to have the survivors picked up from the beach and taken to Sao Luis, Brazil where they were hospitalized. After leaving the hospital they were transported to Belem aboard the Norwegian freighter BANADEROS. From Belem they were flown to New York via Miami.

The 60 survivors who were in this boat are as follows:
SS CHICKASAW CITY (3)
DIAZ, Camillo
MAGKAKIAN, Levon
DAZZO, Joseph A.

SS COLORADAN (5)
FRANK, Speed T.
FLANAGAN, E.C.
GROSSMAN, Max
MARTINIS, Walter
RORPTON, Cyril W.

SS EXAMELIA (5)
ADAMS, Daniel F.
LEJDER, Edward
MILLS, Frederick J.
ROBINSON, Stanley
WASSONG, John R.

SS SWlFTSURE (8)
ERLAND, Edward
MATTHEWS, Marion J.
MERCER, Belmont
NIEGOS, Guilherme
OLSEN, Laurence
STROAT, Hollis E.
PERHO, Harry C.
WINSLOW, Charles A.

MS FIRETHORN (11 )
BODINELLI, Harry E.
BURTON, Ferris H.
BYRD, Harwood B.
FISHER, Alfred
LUCAS, James R.
PHIPPS, Henry J.
ROLLINS, Leonard T.
SEAWELL, Ernest N.
STANDISH, Chester A.
RUITENBERG, G.
VANTOL, Gerrit

MS ZAANDAM (28)
AUSTIN, Wallace J.
BARRON, William L.
CRADDOCK, Joseph S.
CRUM, John W.
KARLIN, Louis
WIEDEMAN, Gaylord H.
ADRIAANOR, William J.
BROEKHOF, W.
EMHOF, FNU
KRENK, W.
PAHNQUIST, L.J.
ROOS, J.R.
STENEKES, Seitze
VAN BLEIT, J.
BRIIONES, Teoderico
REID, Joseph L.
TOMSON, Edward
CALLAHAN, Austin L.

Messman
OS
2 2c USN


AB
Messman
Messman
Bosun
2nd Mate


Messman
2nd Cook
Ch engr
S 2c USN
Fireman


Fireman
Master
Ch. Engr
Cook
AB (Died after landing on the beach)
OS
AB
Fireman


S 2c USN
S 2c USN
S 2c USN
S 2c USN
S 2c USN
S 2c
S 2c
S 1c
S 1c
AB (Dutch)
AB (Dutch)


SM 3c USN
S 2c USN
S2c USN
BM 1c USN
AS USN
SM 3c USN
Bosun
2nd Mate (In charge of boat)
Deck Officer
AB
--
--
AB (Died on the Beach)
Deck Officer
Repatriated seaman from SS WILSOX
Repatriated seaman from SS WEST KEANE
Repatriated seaman from SS MALAY
Civilian passenger

plus 10 members of the Steward's Dept. from Java.
U.S. MERCHANT SEAMEN LOST ON THE MS ZAANDAM
To find the names of those lost, see Pages 522, 581, and 582.
See lists for ZAANDAM, COLORADAN, EXAMELIA,and SWIFTSURE.

U.S. NAVAL ARMED GUARD LOST ON THE MS ZAANDAM
From the SS EXAMELIA
BEEZLEY, George F.
ERNER, Vernon E.
LEOVY, Thomas M., Jr.
SCHLEGELMILCH, Edison F.
SHARBOB, Sylvester L.

From the SS CHICKASAW CITY
CROW, Marvin E.
DEARWESTER, Kenneth W.
DECKER, Pete
DEFINA, Joseph P.
FAWKS, Arnold G.

From the MS ZAANDAM
(Assigned to this ship)
ARTRIP, Denver T.
FUDALA, Stanley A.
JANKOWSKI, Matthew M.
JENSEN, Donald E.
JOHNSON, Everett W.
JOWDY, Emil J.
KACEVICH, Vincent S.
LABBE, Normand L.
MADDOX, James S.
SATTERWHITE, Jos J.

AS
AS
Ensign
AS
AS


S 1c
AS
AS
AS
Ensign



AS
S 2c
AS
AS
AS
AS
AS
AS
Ensign
S 2c

NOTE: The lifeboat with 72 survivors on board was in charge of K. Karssen, 2nd Officer of the ZAANDAM. The boat with 34 aboard was in charge of J. DeLange, a deck officer on the ZAANDAM. Unfortunately, there are no records in the National Archives showing the number of U.S.N. Armed Guard lost from the SS SWIFTSURE.

83 DAYS ON A RAFT FROM THE MS ZAANDAM
A raft with 16 survivors aboard, unseen by the 3 lifeboats, was still floatin in the area of the sinking. One of the 16 men, Cornelius Van Der Sloat, a 40-year-old Oiler from the ZAANDAM, sighted another raft empty of people. As the raft he was on was overcrowded, he jumped overboard and swam to the empty raft. Within the next two hours he was joined by three other survivors. They were Ensign James Maddox, the 30-year-old Officer in charge of the ZAANDAM Armed Guard contingent.; George Beezely, a U.S. Navy Armed Guard from the SS EXAMELIA; and Nicko Hoogendam, a 17-year-old A.B. from the MS FIRETHORN.
Basil Izzi, a 20-year-old U.S. Navy Armed Guard stationed aboard the ZAANDAM, had jumped overboard after the 2nd torpedo struck. He had been clinging to various pieces of wreckage for nearly two days. Near the end of the 2nd day he spotted a raft with 4 men aboard. He swam to the raft and was pulled aboard. This made a total of five men on the raft. On the 60th day, Beezley became ill. In spite of the good care of the others he died on the 66th day. He was buried at sea with Ensign Maddox conducting the service. On the 73rd day, Maddox became ill and died. As the days passed, the situation became critical for the three survivors.
On the 83rd day they heard the noise of an airplane engine. The plane was seen but it disappeared later. At this time they lost hope that they had been seen. But on the next day, the 83rd, smoke was seen on the horizon. Soon a convoy was seen escorted by Navy ships.
On board of one of the escorts, the PC 576, the raft was spotted by a lookout, Seaman 3c B. DeWitte. Soon the PC 576 was alongside the raft and took the 3 survivors aboard. Van Der Sloat was the only one who could still stand and walk. They were fed liquid food for 2 days. They were landed at Pernambuco, Brazil where they spent 6 weeks in a hospital. They were then flown to Miami and then to the U.S. Navy hospital in Bethesda where they fully recovered.
For having spotted the raft, Seaman DeWitte was promoted to S1c.

**** End ****
Page 625 - 667 of "A Careless Word...a Needles Sinking by Captain Arthur R. Moore.